Description: Martin Luther King, Jr. received his doctorate of theology from Boston University in 1955, and he donated more than 80,000 personal papers to the university before he died. Coretta Scott King has filed suit against the university to get the papers returned to her. Interviews with students on campus about whether BU should return the papers to Scott King. The law firm of Melvin Miller, a BU Trustee, is handling the case for the university. Miller has accused Scott King of trying to profit from her husbands' materials. Scott King does not believe that King's agreement with the university is binding. Interview with BU Vice President Greg Felker and Black Student Union President Kiphanie Radford about the case. Shots of the papers and footage of Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King. This tape includes additional footage of King's papers on display at BU.
1:00:10: Visual: Black and white footage of Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) delivering the "I Have a Dream" speech. Marcus Jones reports that King was one of Boston University's most distinguished graduates; that King received his doctorate of theology from the university in 1955; that a statue in honor of King was placed on the campus after his assassination in 1968. V: Shots of students on the BU campus near the statue honoring King; of the statue honoring King. Jones reports that King donated more than 80,000 personal papers to the university before he died; that Coretta Scott King (widow of King) wants the papers returned to her. V: Black and white shots of King. Shots of the King papers on display; of Coretta Scott King. Jones reports that Coretta Scott King has filed suit against BU. V: Shot of Coretta Scott King standing near the Martin Luther King's grave. Footage of a white male student saying that the university should give the papers back; of an Asian American female student saying that BU is within its rights to keep the papers. Footage of a white female student saying that BU should return the papers if they are not being cared for properly. Footage of a male student saying that Coretta Scott King should have the papers. Jones reports that the law firm of Melvin Miller (BU Trustee) is handling the case for the university; that Miller accuses Coretta Scott King of trying to make a profit from her husband's written material. V: Footage of Miller addressing an audience. Shot of a newspaper article in The Daily Free Press with a headline reading, "Miller: Mrs. King not telling the truth." Footage of King delivering the "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington in 1963. Shot of Coretta Scott King. Jones reports that Coretta Scott King claims that Martin Luther King had changed his mind about keeping his papers at BU before his death. Jones notes that Miller disputes the claim by Coretta Scott King. V: Footage of Greg Felker (Vice President, BU Student Union) saying that BU should return the papers. Felker adds that there is evidence to support Coretta Scott King's claim that Martin Luther King changed his mind about housing the papers at BU. Footage of Kiphanie Radford (President, BU Black Student Union) saying that there may be merit in BU's refusal to return the papers. Shot of King's papers on display. Text of a quote from King is displayed on screen. Jones quotes a letter written by King to BU: "In the event of my death, all such materials deposited with the University shall become from that date the absolute property of Boston University." Jones says that Coretta Scott King claims that King's letter is not binding. V: Shots of Coretta Scott King at the grave of Martin Luther King; of a sign for the Martin Luther King Jr. reading room at Boston University. Jones stands on the BU campus. Jones reports that the public outcry surrounding the issue has not convinced BU to return the papers. Jones adds that BU is scheduled to respond to Coretta Scott King's charges on Monday, which is the anniversary of King's death.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/01/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that James Farmer (civil rights leader) spoke at Faneuil Hall during a ceremony to commemorate the death of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Jones notes that Farmer was the head of the Congress for Racial Equality in the 1950s. Jones' report includes footage of Farmer addressing the audience at Faneuil Hall. Jones interviews Farmer about progress on civil rights issues in the US. Jones reports that Charles Yancey read a proclamation honoring King during the ceremony at Faneuil Hall. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of Yancey reading a proclamation at the ceremony and by footage of schoolchildren performing at the ceremony. Jones' report also includes footage of King during the civil rights movement. This tape includes additional footage from the ceremony at Faneuil Hall. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Jesse Jackson (Democratic candidate for US President) has released position papers, detailing his stance on domestic issues
1:00:04: Visual: Black and white footage of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader) delivering a speech. Black and white footage of a white man announcing the death of King to a group of students. Marcus Jones reports that today is the twentieth anniversary of King's death. Jones reports that James Farmer (civil rights leader) talked to an audience at a ceremony commemorating King's death at Faneuil Hall. V: Footage of Farmer addressing an audience at Fanueil Hall. Farmer talks about King's vision for the nation. Shots of the audience. Jones reports that Farmer was the head of the Congress for Racial Equality in the 1950s; that Farmer is now a visiting professor at Mary Washington College in Virginia. Jones says that Farmer believes that minorities have made great strides in the past twenty years. V: Footage of Farmer being interviewed by Jones at Faneuil Hall. Farmer says that there are plenty of things that need to change in the US; that some progress has been made by minorities. Jones reports that Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) read a city proclamation honoring King at the ceremony at Faneuil Hall. V: Footage of Yancey addressing the audience. Yancey says that King was once refused admittance to the Patrick T. Campbell Junior High School in Boston; that the school is now named for King. Jones reports that students from the Martin Luther King Middle School performed a song in honor of King. V: Footage of students from the King Middle School performing at Faneuil Hall. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/04/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports on Northeastern University's observation of the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. Jones notes that a ceremony commemorating King's life was held at the university. Jones' report includes footage from the ceremony. Sonia Sanchez (poet and teacher) talks about King. Jones' report also includes footage of King. Susan Sullivan (Northeastern Law student) makes the announcement that the university is awarding an honorary law degree to Nelson Mandela. Interviews with Daniel Givelber (Dean, Northeastern University School of Law) and Sullivan about the decision to award a degree to Mandela. Jones notes that the university trustees overturned a policy which required recipients of degrees to pick them up in person. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: David Scondras, Charles Yancey and Ray Flynn: Boston City Council makes fair housing policy
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of an African American man performing a song at a ceremony commemorating the life of Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) at Northeastern University. Shots of the audience. Marcus Jones reports that hundreds of people gathered at Northeastern to commemorate the life of King; that King's 59th birthday is Friday. V: Shots of King addressing a crowd; of King marching at the head of a group of civil rights demonstrators. Footage of Sonia Sanchez (poet and teacher) talks about King's struggle to advance the cause of civil rights. Sanchez says that King's work is not finished. Shots of audience members applauding. Jones reports that Sanchez was the featured speaker at the ceremony; that the remarks of Susan Sullivan (Northeastern Law student) were the highlight of the event. V: Footage of Sullivan announcing that the Board of Trustees at Northeastern University has decided to award an honorary law degree to Nelson Mandela (jailed South African leader). The crowd applauds. Jones reports that Northeastern law students have petitioned the university for three years to grant a degree to Mandela. V: Shot of the entrance to the library at Northeastern Law School. Shot of a paper taped to the door of the library. A handwritten note on the paper reads, "Trustees grant Mandela Honorary Degree." Jones reports that the request had been previously denied due to a policy which required recipients of degrees to pick them up in person. Jones notes that Mandela has been jailed by the South African government because of his opposition to apartheid. V: Black and white footage of Mandela speaking; of a sign for Pollsmoor Prison, where Mandela is held. Jones notes that the university's decision to accede to the demands of students and faculty is unprecedented. V: Footage of Jones interviewing Daniel Givelber (Dean, Northeastern University School of Law). Givelbar says that Northeastern has an unusually diverse group of Trustees; that the Trustees felt like they were doing the right thing. Givelbar notes that the Board of Trustees made the decision to divest two years ago. Footage of Susan Sullivan saying that the degree should have been granted when the students first petitioned for it; that the law students should not have had to fight so hard for it. Sullivan says that international recognition could hasten Mandela's release from jail. Jones notes that the scheduled protest by the students turned into a celebration. Jones says that Northeastern students hope that other universities will follow Northeastern's example.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on controversy over a new student assignment plan for the Boston Public Schools, which minority members of the Boston School Committee spoke out against at a breakfast commemorating the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.. School Committee members John O'Bryant, Juanita Wade, Jean McGuire, and Gerald Anderson speak to the media. They do not believe that the plan will provide equitable education for all. The plan was proposed by mayor Ray Flynn. It will allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend. Interview with Flynn, who defends the proposal, saying that it's supported by parents. He adds that School Committee members have been asked for input on the plan. Vaillancourt also reports that Flynn has proposed the decentralization of the Boston School Department and selling off the headquarters of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt reports that minority members of the School Committee may rescind their support for superintendent Laval Wilson if he supports Flynn's school choice proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Elma Lewis in Marsh Chapel at Boston University on Martin Luther King Day and Carmen Fields interviews Robert Nemiroff about the playwright Lorraine Hansberry
1:00:26: Visual: Footage of city and state leaders including Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), Bernard Cardinal Law (Archidiocese of Boston), and Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) singing together at celebration in honor of the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Meg Vaillancourt reports that local leaders gathered over breakfast today to celebrate Martin Luther King's birthday. Vaillancourt notes that there was controversy at the breakfast over a new assignment plan for students in Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of Juanita Wade (Boston School Committee) speaking to the media. School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire sit beside Wade. Wade calls the new plan "segregation redux." Wade says that the Boston Public Schools need to provide choice, equity, and a quality education right now. Footage of Flynn speaking to the media. Flynn says that the plan has the support of the citizens of Boston; that parents are looking for this kind of reform. Vaillancourt reports that the new plan would allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend; that parents have not been able to choose schools since school desegregation began in 1974. V: Shots of buses pulling up to the front of South Boston High School in 1974; of South Boston residents jeering at the buses. Shots of buses parked in front of South Boston High School; of African American students walking among the buses. Vaillancourt notes that the population of white students in Boston Public Schools has declined since 1974; that non-white students make up 70% of the student population in Boston Public Schools. Vaillancourt adds that the School System has been criticized for not providing students with a quality education. V: Shots of non-white students in a classroom; of an African American male student sitting in a classroom. Shot of Flynn. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and two consultants have proposed a plan to improve the schools and to increase parental choice. V: Footage of School Committee members O'Bryant, Wade, McGuire, and Gerald Anderson sitting on a couch. African American community leaders, including Charles Yancey (Boston City Council), Eugene Rivers (African Peoples Pentecostal Church) and Louis Elisa (Boston chapter of the NAACP), stand behind them. Anderson addresses the media. Anderson says that the Boston School System needs to provide a quality education to all before it can claim to be equitable. Anderson says that the mayor needs to provide more funding to the schools. Shots of O'Bryant and other community leaders. Footage of Flynn being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Flynn if he is surprised by the attitude of the African American community leaders. Flynn says that he has been working on the proposal for several months; that community leaders have had many opportunities to review and give input on the proposal. Footage of Anderson saying that he is offended by Flynn's attitude. Anderson notes that Flynn has said that the statements of the African American leaders are "bogus." Anderson says that the community leaders are standing up for their constituents; that Flynn's statements are "bogus." Footage of Flynn saying that the members of the School Committee have had input on the proposal; that the members of the School Committee voted twelve-to-one in favor of the plan. Flynn says that the School Committee members were told that they would have further opportunities to give input on the proposal. Footage of McGuire saying that Flynn's proposal will cost more money. McGuire says that the School Committee has not been given additional money to fund Flynn's proposal. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Public School System spends more money per student than any other public school system in the nation. V: Shot of an African American teacher and student at the front of a classroom; of a white male student seated in a classroom; of an African American female student seated in a classroom. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn has come up with another controversial proposal to fund neighborhood schools; that Flynn has suggested the decentralization of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt adds that the proposal would sell off the downtown headquarters of the Boston School Department on Court Street. V: Shots of the exterior of the Boston School Department headquarters. Footage of Flynn saying that the downtown headquarters of the School Department should be sold; that the money should be put into neighborhood schools. Footage of O'Bryant saying that the School System is going to end up back in court if it does not receive support from the city. Vaillancourt reports that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has supported Flynn's school choice plan; that Wilson's contract ends in June. V: Shots of a meeting in the chambers of the Boston School Committee; of Wilson speaking at a School Committee meeting. Vaillancourt reports that the African American members have voted to extend Wilson's contract in the past. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson's future support among the Committee's African American members may depend on his position on Flynn's school choice plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/16/1989
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Princess Zenani Dlamini, daughter of Nelson and Winnie Mandela, and her husband Prince Thumbumuzi Dlamini, son of the late King of Swaziland, will attend Boston University. The couple has expressed a desire to abstain from politics while attending the university. Press conference where Zenani Dlamini answers questions about her parents. Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of events in South Africa and by footage of Nelson Mandela. BU President John Silber stirred up controversy when he awarded an honorary degree to Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi, the South African Zulu Chief, instead of Nelson Mandela. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) must improve the reading skills of its students
0:59:58: Visual: Footage of Princess Zenani Dlamini saying that she has come to Boston to be a student. Footage of Princess Zenani and Prince Thumbumuzi Dlamini exiting a building and walking on the campus of Boston University. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Princess Zenani is the daughter of Nelson Mandela (black South African leader ); that Prince Thumbumuzi is the son of the late king of Swaziland; that the couple will be attending Boston University on full scholarship. V: Shot of Princess Zenani at a statue commemorating Martin Luther King (American civil rights leader) on the campus of Boston University. Footage of Zenani at a press conference, saying that she has come here to fulfill her dream and her parents' dream. Zenani quotes Martin Luther King, saying that people should not be judged by the color of their skin. Shots of the press at Princess Zenani's press conference; of Prince Thumbumuzi and Princess Zenani speaking. Vaillancourt reports that neither Prince Thumbumuzi nor Princess Zenani discussed US policy in South Africa; that Princess Zenani answered questions about her mother and father. V: Shot of Winnie Mandela (wife of Nelson Mandela). Black and white footage of Nelson Mandela speaking. Footage of Princess Zenani saying that she first met her father when she visited him in prison at age 16. Princess Zenani describes the experience of visiting her father in prison. Princess Zenani says that she first hugged her father in December, 1977. Shots of Prince Thumbumuzi and Princess Zenani at the press conference. Footage of Princess Zenani saying that she will focus on her education. Prince Thumbumuzi says that they will react to important events in their homeland, but will try to focus on their schoolwork. Vaillancourt says that Prince Thumbumuzi and Princess Zenani will try to abstain from political discussions; that Boston University is associated with the politics of John Silber (President, Boston University). V: Footage of Silber conferring an honorary degree on Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi (South African Zulu Chief) in November, 1986. Student protesters carrying signs walk out of the auditorium. Vaillancourt reports that protesters believe that Silber honored Buthelezi because he is a more conservative leader than Nelson Mandela. V: Footage of Princess Zenani at the press conference, saying that her father has no objections to her attending Boston University. Vaillancourt reports that there is controversy surrounding a "mansion" being built by Winnie Mandela in Soweto. V: Shot of a newspaper headline reading that the Mandela house is "fit for a queen." Footage of Winnie Mandela with black South African children. Footage of Prince Thumbumuzi at the press conference, saying that the controversy surrounding the house has been blown out of proportion; that Winnie Mandela has adopted many children who will live in the house with Winnie and her relatives. Princess Zenani talks about Winnie Mandela's strength and courage. Shots of soldiers in armored vehicles and gunfire in the streets of South Africa. Shots of Prince Thumbumuzi and Princess Zenani walking on the campus of Boston University. Shots of young black children in South Africa; of a shantytown in South Africa; of children on the street in South Africa. Vaillancourt reports that it will not be easy for Prince Thumbumuzi and Princess Zenani to separate themselves from the struggle against apartheid in South Africa.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/13/1987
Description: Fritz Wetherbee reports that Annie Johnson, a Boston resident, will receive the Living Legacy Award in Washington DC. Johnson grew up in Boston and organized domestic workers through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston in the 1960s. She led the workers on a campaign for benefits. Interview with Johnson in her home. She talks about the importance of helping others. Johnson discusses her aunt, Eleanor Graves Chandler, who was an early community activist. Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen and visiting a senior citizen meal program at the Grace Baptist Church.
1:00:12: Visual: Footage of Annie Johnson (Living Legacy Award winner) saying that a person can be poor and "colored" and still help everybody. Fritz Wetherbee reports that Johnson is 83 years old; that Johnson will fly to Washington DC to receive her Living Legacy Award. V: Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen at home. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is preparing the food for Project Soup; that Project Soup is a senior citizen meal program at Grace Baptist Church. V: Footage of Johnson saying that people have called her for help when she is sick in bed; that she will get up to try to help them, before going back to bed to lie down. Wetherbee reports that Johnson grew up in Boston; that she has lived in the same house on Elmwood Street for 46 years; that she raised seven children in the house. V: Shots of Elmwood Street in Boston; of the exterior of Johnson's house on Elmwood Street. Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen. Wetherbee reports that Johnson organized domestic workers in the 1960s, through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston. Wetherbee notes that Johnson succeeded in winning minimum wage, worker's compensation, social security, and regular days off for the workers. Wetherbee adds that Johnson organized a job training program for the workers. V: Shot of the prepared chicken in a foil dish. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is the niece of Eleanor Graves Chandler. V: Shot of an African American woman serving chicken to elderly women at Project Soup. Footage of Johnson saying that Chandler was a politician; that Chandler believed that African American women should be active in politics and civic life. Johnson says that she can remember taking people to register to vote when she was younger. Johnson talks about another one of her relatives who was "an advocate for her race." Shot of Johnson leaving the Grace Baptist Church, carrying some flowers. Wetherbee reports that Martin Luther King Sr., Jesse Owens, Rosa Parks, A. Philip Randolph, and Roy Wilkins have all been awarded the Living Legacy Award; that Johnson will receive the award this evening. V: Footage of Johnson saying that many other racial groups have followed the lead of African Americans in their struggle for civil rights.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/20/1987
Description: Jan von Mehren reports on Henry Hampton's address to students at Boston University. Von Mehren notes that Hampton talked about the importance of campus activism and civil rights. Von Mehren's report includes footage of Hampton speaking to the student audience. Hampton encourage students to make demands on the university administration. Pearl Shelton (community activist) addresses the students from the audience. She encourages them to become involved in the struggle for change in society. Von Mehren's report also includes footage of Rosa Moreno (Boston University law student) and Derek Davis (Boston University law student) talking about the lack of activism on college campuses. Von Mehren discusses the role of campus activism in the civil rights movement in the 1960s. Von Mehren's report includes footage from Eyes on the Prize of Diane Nash (civil rights activist). This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: K.C. Jones of the Boston Celtics reacts to racist remarks made by Jimmy "the Greek" Snyder on national television Reactions to comments by Jimmy "the Greek"
1:00:06: Visual: Black and white footage of the Civil Rights Movement from Eyes on the Prize. African American students face off with white police officers during the civil rights movement. African American student demonstrators are marching on a street. Shot of an FBI poster seeking information on the murder of three civil rights activists. Shots of students being escorted into police vehicles; of police using fire hoses on civil rights activists in Birmingham, Alabama. Shots of civil rights activists at city hall in Nashville, Tennessee; of Diane Nash (civil rights activist) standing with Ben West (Mayor of Nashville). Footage of Nash saying that she asked West if he believed that discrimination was wrong. Footage of West saying that he told Nash that discrimination was morally wrong. Shot of Nash applauding as she faces West. Jan von Mehren talks about how students were on the front lines of the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Von Mehren notes that some civil rights activists lost their lives; that some were jailed. Von Mehren talks about the participation of college student Diane Nash in the civil rights movement. Von Mehren says that today's college students have only vague memories of the civil rights movement. Von Mehren reports that Henry Hampton (civil rights activist and filmmaker) addressed a group of high school and college students today at Boston University. V: Shots of students listening to Hampton speak; of Hampton addressing the students. Footage of a white female student asking Hampton how Boston University can increase the enrollment of minority students. Hampton says that students need to be persistent in making demands on the administration. Von Mehren stands at the back of the auditorium where Hampton is speaking. Von Mehren says that the civil rights activists from the 1960s are trying to convince the younger generation to become active. V: Footage of Pearl Shelton (community activist) standing in the audience. She asks how many students are members of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) or the Urban League. Shelton says that students need to give something back to society. Footage of Shelton being interviewed by von Mehren. Shelton says that Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) would be disappointed in the lack of activity in the current movement for civil rights. Footage of Rosa Moreno (Boston University law student) saying that there is apathy among students today; that some students do not know how to become involved; that civil rights organizations need to distribute information to students. Footage of Derek Davis (Boston University law student) saying that students have not mobilized behind one cause or political candidate; that many students are disillusioned or skeptical; that some students are interested in fighting for change. Shots of Hampton addressing the crowd; of students in the crowd listening to Hampton. Von Mehren says that today's students have not united behind one cause; that many are trying to make a difference. V: Footage of Hampton saying that today's students need to dream like King did. Shot of the audience applauding.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/18/1988