Description: Press conference at Boston Schools Information Center to sum up week one of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister introduces the Boston School Report with a summary of the day's events. Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator, Mayor's Office) introduces the participants. Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) comments on a successful opening of schools. Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) gives a report on school suspensions and comments that the atmosphere in the schools is good. William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) comments on the opening week at South Boston High School. Pat Brady (Detective, Boston Police Department) reads a police report detailing arrests and injuries. Brady reports that there were no major incidents today and that extra police will continue to be deployed. Dr. Louis Perullo (Boston School Department) analyzes school attendance statistics. Perullo compares attendance statistics from the 1975-76 school year to attendance statistics from the 1974-1975 school year. Reporters ask Reid about an altercation at South Boston High School and the effect of community demonstrations on the atmosphere in the schools. Reid says that outside disturbances have a negative effect on the atmosphere inside the schools. Fahey says that she has no control over demonstrations outside of the school. Fahey reports on increased attendance at the city's magnet schools. Reporters ask Fahey and Perullo about school attendance and the possibility of a non-white majority in the Boston school population. Fahey says that she is not yet ready to predict a non-white majority. Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department) reports on the activity of federal marshals in Boston and the ongoing federal investigations into violations of the federal court order. Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey) announces a change in operating hours for the Boston Schools Information Center. This tape has audible time code on track 2 and visible time code burned in at the top of the picture.
17:00:00: Visual: Opening credits read Boston School Report. Press conference at Boston Schools Information Center sums up events during week one of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister gives a summary of the day's events: school attendance dropped to 68.4% from 69.1% on the previous day; six African American students were sent home after a scuffle with white students at South Boston High School; no suspensions at South Boston High School; three peaceful protest marches were held. Reporters at the press conference include Baumeister and Walt Sanders. 17:00:51: V: Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator, Mayor's Office) opens the press conference, reminding all that it is day five of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. He introduces the panel: Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School), Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey), Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department), Peter Meade (Mayor's Office). 17:01:52: V: Meade says that the school personnel deserve a lot of credit for their efforts; that students and parents deserve credit for behaving responsibly during the first week of Phase II desegregation. Meade says that the opening of schools was a success; that many doubted it would go as well as it did; that the city's problems are not over. 17:03:08: V: Fahey says that she is pleased with the progress made in the schools; that she would like to thank the staff of the school system; that ten African American males, 16 white males, five African American females and three white females were suspended over the past week. She introduces Dr. Louis Perullo (Boston School Department), who analyzes attendance statistics for the school system. She says that there were no arrests in the schools all week; that the atmosphere in the schools is good. 17:05:13: V: Brinn introduces Reid. Reid says that he prefers not to compare Phase I desegregation to Phase II; that they are more prepared this year; that he would like to see higher attendance figures; that the past week at South Boston High School was adequate. 17:06:38: V: Brinn stalls as he waits for Pat Brady (Detective, Boston Police Department). Brady reads a statement from Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). The statement reads that there were no major incidents today; that no students were injured in incidents related to school desegregation during the week; that the peaceful opening of schools was due to increased police presence and effective leadership by community leaders; that 112 arrests were made during the week; that 16 police officers were injured; that DiGrazia is pleased with the events of the past week; that extra police will continue to be deployed. 17:09:00: V: Perullo talks about statistics he has compiled. He compares attendance statistics from a Thursday and Friday during the first week of Phase I busing with statistics from a Thursday and Friday during the first week of Phase II. Attendance was down significantly on Friday at all levels during Phase I. Attendance was down slightly on Friday at the high schools and middle schools during Phase II; the elementary schools experienced a slight increase. Perullo says that school attendance usually drops on Fridays. Perullo introduces a table with total attendance by area and level of schooling. He finds that attendance did not change significantly from yesterday to today in any of the areas except high schools; that attendance at Jamaica Plain High School decreased 5.5%; that attendance at Hyde Park High School decreased 6.9%; that attendance at Dorchester High School decreased 5.0%; that attendance at South Boston High School and East Boston High School decreased 4.4% and 5.3% respectively; that attendance at the magnet high schools declined only slightly; that elementary schools in Roslindale saw an increase in attendance of 3.5%. Perullo says that high school attendance increased from 60.3% on Monday to 68% on Thursday; that high school attendance today was down 2.6% from Thursday; that middle schools increased from 60% on Monday to 70.3% on Wednesday; that middle school attendance was down ).7% from Wednesday; that elementary school attendance increased from 58.1% on Monday to 69.8% today. Perullo says that white attendance increased from 56.9% on Monday to 64% on Wednesday; that white attendance was down 1.8% from Wednesday; that African American attendance increased from 62.5% to a high of 75% on Thursday; that today's African American attendance was down 0.6%; that the attendance of other minorities increased from 55% on Monday to 75.9% on Friday. 17:14:52: V: Brinn invites questions from the media. Reporter asks Perullo if he can verify that white students comprise 46% of the school system while African Americans and other minorities comprise 54%. Perullo says he has not yet analyzed those numbers and cannot verify the statistic. Baumeister asks Fahey if she has investigated claims by Frank Power (Headmaster, Charlestown High School), that the projected enrollment numbers are high. Fahey says that she has no answer. Reid says that it is normal to plan for the attendance of every student who might attend, even those whose attendance is doubtful; that students drop out or move away over the summer; that it is difficult to compare actual enrollment to projected enrollment during the first week of school; that actual enrollment is usually less than projected enrollment. 17:17:41: V: A reporter asks Reid about the atmosphere at South Boston High School, as compared to the previous year. Reid says that he does not remember the climate last year; that he has had a good first week of school; that the students were restless today due to a prayer march and rumors of a walkout. A reporter asks Reid about a disturbance resulting in a request for state troopers at South Boston High School today. Reid says that he works closely with Major Gilligan (Massachusetts State Police Department); that Gilligan places troopers where he thinks they will be effective; that decisions concerning the number of troopers are made by him, Gilligan, and the officer in charge of the building; that an altercation at South Boston High School began with an African American student who said he was punched; that three African American students were brought to the office to file reports; that another altercation involving one of these three students occurred after lunch; that he is investigating the situation. 17:20:39: V: A reporter asks Reid if he finds prayer marches and demonstrations outside of the building disruptive. Reid says that any actions taken by the outside community create tension in the school. A reporter reminds Fahey that she had told him that demonstrations outside Charlestown High School had no negative effects on the African American students inside the building. Fahey says that she does not dispute Reid's analysis of the atmosphere in his school; that normal school activity is taking place despite marches in South Boston, Charlestown and Hyde Park; that it is not up to her to restrict parade permits for these marches. A reporter says that Headmaster Power had complained that the number of non-school personnel present at Charlestown High School made it difficult to operate the school. Reid says that he shares Power's concern; that the court order allows 12 community persons to be in the school; that two persons are sufficient to monitor activity and report on the atmosphere. 17:22:54: V: A reporter asks Fahey for observations on the performance of the magnet schools so far. Fahey says that attendance has increased at the magnet schools; that programs in conjunction with area universities will be implemented; that programs are currently under review include a program between English High School and University of Massachusetts as well as an open education program involving the Martin Luther King School and Antioch University. Baumeister asks Murphy if any charges have been filed in cases involving Molotov cocktails. Murphy says that no charges have been filed; that charges may be filed at the end of next week. Baumeister reminds Murphy that the local US attorney has already filed civil charges in one case. Murphy says his office is working together with the local US attorney. Baumeister asks if federal marshals have made any arrests on their own in the past week. Murphy says that they have made no arrests. Baumeister asks if they have been instructed to use restraint. Murphy says that they have been instructed to be professional. 17:24:38: V: A reporter asks Meade if he can share any Police Department intelligence. Meade replies that he does not attend the police intelligence briefings and if he did, he would not share the information. A reporter asks Meade if the mayor will continue to request that two battalions of the National Guard be on call for the city at the expense of $37,000 per day. Meade responds that the decision will be made jointly by the mayor and the governor; that the expense had not been discussed; that a reduction of troops in the public safety plan must be submitted to the court. A reporter asks Fahey if she knows the racial breakdown of the kindergarten population. Fahey says that the school department is making efforts to gather that data. A reporter asks Fahey about the possibility of white students becoming the minority in Boston schools. Fahey says that she is not yet ready to predict a non-white majority; that the school system is engaged in a recruitment program for students of all races; that white attendance has gone up in Roslindale elementary schools; that recruitment is going on in West Roxbury, Jamaica Plain and Brighton; that it is too soon to make predictions. 17:29:26: V: A reporter comments on the fact that white students are staying away from schools in African American communities. Fahey says that this is true; that white parents may be keeping children out until they are sure the schools are safe; that the safety of the schools has been demonstrated over the past week. A reporter asks Fahey how long she thinks parents will wait before sending their children. Fahey says that the decision is up to individual parents. Baumeister asks if Fahey has seen results from the campaign to attract students back to the schools. Fahey says she has not had feedback from teachers; that over the past week teachers have been calling the parents of absentee students; that over the next two weeks teachers will write letters to the parents; that teachers will make personal visits to parents if they get no response from the letters or phone calls. A reporter comments that many classes will be racially imbalanced if white students do not return to schools in the next few weeks. Fahey says that she will refer the matter to the court. A reporter asks if it will be easier for parents to transfer students to a new school if classes are deemed to be racially imbalanced. Fahey reviews the transfer procedure and says that a transfer might be accepted if it does not upset the racial balance in either school. 17:35:01: V: Brinn invites other questions. Brady says that two arrests have been reported since his last report. An African American juvenile male was arrested at the Barton Rogers School for disorderly conduct and an African American juvenile female was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon relating to an incident on September 9th at the temporary Madison Park High School. Brady confirms 112 arrests for the week. Reporter asks if the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) will be pulled out of South Boston. Brady responds that the TPF is stationed where it is needed. 17:36:46: V: Brinn invites Murphy to make a statement about the past week's events. Murphy says that he is happy that the federal marshals have made no arrests; that few arrests indicate that the situation is not so bad; that the marshals will continue to be stationed at the schools; that his office is investigating a dozen cases; that he does not expect a dozen indictments; that he is working on these cases with the state district attorney's office, the US attorney's office, the FBI, and the Bureau of Tobacco and Firearms. 17:38:28: V: Foley announces a change in operating hours for the Boston Schools Information Center. Foley says that the phone lines will be open until 5:30pm; that the center has received very few calls during the evenings. Fahey thanks the media and mentions that she will no longer attend press conferences on a regular basis; that she will be working hard to improve programs in the schools; that Boston is dealing with the same problems that many urban schools are facing. Fahey excuses herself. Brinn thanks the participants and the media, then closes the press conference. Baumeister gives a summary of the press conference.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/12/1975
Description: Press conference at the Boston Schools Information Center on day two of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Footage is silent until 00:01:37. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) takes questions about the arrests of 74 members of the Committee Against Racism, and how the police and judiciary process mass arrests in South Boston. DiGrazia also answers questions about police restraint and police response to violence in the streets. Ed Baumeister (WGBH reporter) notes that there are many arrests for minor infractions and few arrests for major incidents. Greg Pilkington (WGBH reporter) questions the police policy of restraint. DiGrazia says that there is a difference between low visibility and restraint; that police are making arrests. J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General) discusses the presence of federal marshals in Boston and the ongoing federal investigations into violations of the federal court order. Pottinger says that antibusing activity at night can be considered a violation of the court order. DiGrazia says that police are making great efforts to crack down on violence and vandalism during the evening hours. Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) reports on public safety teams in Charlestown. Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reports on school attendance and atmosphere. She gives information on registration for students without school assignments. Reporters ask Pottinger questions about the federal investigations of antibusing activity. Reporters ask Fahey questions about school attendance and low attendance among white students. Fahey says that attendance will improve as parents and students realize that the schools are running smoothly. This tape has visible time code burned in at the bottom of the screen.
0:01:27: Visual: Press conference at the Boston Schools Information Center. Panelists assemble at a table with microphones. Reporters include Ed Baumeister (WGBH), John Henning, Greg Pilkington (WGBH), and Walt Sanders. Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator for Mayor Kevin White) begins to speak. Audio cuts in and out. 0:03:04: V: A reporter asks about the arrests of 74 members of the Committee Against Racism in South Boston, and a related confrontation with a hostile crowd at the South Boston courthouse. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) says he has spoken to the parties involved and that the problems at the South Boston courthouse were due to a lack of communication; that Chief Justice Flaschner will work with police and local courts to expedite the booking of arrestees; that he had previously met with Flaschner and others to discuss the expeditious booking of mass arrests; that there was confusion in South Boston on the day in question. A reporter asks if there was a firm agreement with all involved in the meeting to hold court in a venue other than the courthouse if necessary. DiGrazia says there was discussion and plans to implement action if necessary. 0:06:34: V: Baumeister points out that many arrests are made for minor infractions and few arrests are made for more serious acts of violence. DiGrazia responds that there have been quite a few arrests for acts of violence; that members of the Committee Against Racism needed to be moved in order to avoid a major confrontation along a bus route; that the police are trying to neutralize a dangerous situation; that police are showing great restraint. Pilkington points out that restraint by police was not effective during the previous year. DiGrazia interrupts him by saying that there is a difference between low visibility and restraint; that police are actively making arrests this year, but are showing restraint. Reporter asks if there is discussion of calling in the National Guard to aid police at night. DiGrazia says that police are working long hours but performing well; that there are no plans at present to call in the National Guard. 0:09:38: V: A reporter asks about the possibility of federal charges being brought against some arrestees. J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant U.S. Attorney General) responds that charges are being investigated; that federal and state charges may be lodged; that he is personally involved with five investigations. A reporter asks how federal marshals can aid police in the evening if their mandate is to enforce the federal court order. Pottinger says that certain actions outside of school hours could be handled by the federal marshals as violations of the federal court order; that federal marshals are there to assist police; that federal marshals are working long hours. Pottinger confirms that the Justice Department is investigating an incident at the JFK Home and a Molotov cocktail incident; that they are investigating reports of direct intimidation of individuals trying to comply with the court order; that they are investigating some arrests for the assault of police officers. 0:12:38: V: Pilkington asks if the violence committed by youth gangs in Charlestown constitutes a violation of federal law. Pottinger says that the violence may be a violation, especially if the violence involves an assault on a police officer or a fire official. Reporter asks what will be done about nighttime violence and vandalism. DiGrazia says that he will increase police numbers in Charlestown and South Boston; that police will be assisted by federal marshals; that federal marshals will investigate assaults on police officers. A reporter asks Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) to clarify a statement indicating that he has complaints against the media. Meade says that it was a humorous statement directed at a reporter whom he knows well; that he would like to clarify a his answer to a question from yesterday about police presence in Charlestown. 0:15:31: V: A reporter asks Meade what public safety teams are doing to prevent violence and vandalism in Charlestown. Meade says that several people are on the streets trying to calm the situation; that Roberta Delaney (Manager, Charlestown Little City Hall) will hold a meeting that afternoon with a public safety team; that antibusing leaders in Charlestown have made it clear that they do not support violence. A reporter asks DiGrazia to compare today's violence in Charlestown to that of the previous day. DiGrazia says that police did a good job in defusing a difficult situation today. A reporter asks if federal marshals will be on duty for the evening. Pottinger says that the federal marshals will not be on patrol; that they will be available upon request from police. 0:18:09: V: Brinn introduces Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Fahey thanks the public safety officials. Fahey says that attendance is up for both African Americans and whites; that there has been one suspension and no arrests; that the climate in the schools is good; that extracurricular activities are proceeding. Commissioner DiGrazia excuses himself and leaves. A reporter asks Fahey about low white attendance in West Roxbury. Fahey responds that they are watching the situation and will contact students who are absent. Reporter comments that attendance in elementary schools is primarily African American. Fahey says that some white parents may be waiting to assess the climate at the schools before sending their children; that she is confident that white attendance will go up. 0:21:37: V: A reporter asks Pottinger if there are some individuals under investigation who have not been arrested. Pottinger says yes, but that he will not give details. A reporter asks Fahey about students who have not yet been assigned to school. Fahey gives information on two sites where student registration will be held on the following day. Fahey asks the media to disseminate the information. Fahey says that 800 students were processed in last week's preregistration; that 400 students were processed today; that she has no way of knowing how many students still need school assignments. Fahey tells a reporter that she has no information on the suspension of an African American male student today. A reporter asks Fahey about plans to assess student achievement in the desegregated schools. Fahey says that she is working with consultants on assessing math and reading; that attendance is another indication of school performance. 0:25:21: V: Brinn interrupts to clarify Pottinger's title as he prepares to make a statement. Pottinger explains that he will be absent for a few days for personal reasons; that Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department) will be in charge in his absence. Brinn checks with Meade to see if he has a statement, then invites more questions. A reporter asks Pottinger for more detail on investigations of people who have not been arrested. Pottinger says that the investigations are centered on intimidations and threats to those trying to comply with the court order; that the FBI is investigating allegations; that it is possible to move quickly toward indictment if the evidence is sufficient; that he cannot predict when or if an indictment will occur. A reporter asks Pottinger about the five investigations he is involved with personally, and whether they concern people who have not been arrested. Pottinger says that he is familiar with five investigations concerning threats and intimidation as well as arrests made by the state; that there may be other investigations; that there are sitting grand juries available to hear these cases; that he does not think it will be necessary to empanel a grand jury. 0:28:49: V: A reporter asks Fahey where the 25,000 absentee students are. Fahey responds that she does not know. A reporter asks for a summary of the attendance figures. Robert Donahue (Boston School Department) says that the attendance has increased; that some parents have kept children out of school; that attendance will increase as it becomes clear to parents that schools are functioning normally. Fahey gives a rundown of attendance figures for the first and second days of school: that attendance was 60.3% and 64.1% at the high schools; that attendance was 60.1% and 65.8% at the middle schools; that attendance was 58.1% and 64.9% at the elementary schools. 0:30:44: V: Brinn thanks the panelists and closes the press conference. Baumeister gives a summary of the conference. Reporters mill around the room.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/09/1975
Description: Boston Police Department press conference with Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Morris Allen, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. The speakers are seated at a table featuring an array of street weapons used against police in a riot in South Boston on the previous day. Press conference includes police department videotapes of a riot in South Boston on the previous day and of an unruly crowd at a Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) meeting at English High School. DiGrazia announces that violence and disruptions of public order will no longer be tolerated by police.
0:00:16: Visual: Shot of bottles, baseball bats, pipes, bricks and other weapons lying on table. Some have exhibit tags attached to them. Microphones are also set up on the table for a press conference. Shot of a police map of the city of Boston. 0:03:31: V: Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) and others sit down at the table displaying the weapons. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) introduces the police officials on the panel: Captain Morris Allen, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, DiGrazia, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Fred Conley. Dunleavy announces that a short videotape will be shown. 0:05:02: V: A videotape plays on a television screen. The videotape shows a large crowd on a city street. Police officers in riot gear are stationed on the street. Dunleavy points out the weapons used by the crowd, and that the crowd has thrown tear gas at the police. The videotape shows a cloud of tear gas in the police ranks. Rioting crowd charges police, throwing bricks and other objects. Dunleavy says that the street on the videotape is East 6th Street in South Boston. V: The videotape shows crowd throwing rocks and other objects. The crowd retreats, still throwing objects, as police advance. Dunleavy announces that the next videotape was shot at English High School last Thursday at a meeting of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC). V: The videotape shows a noisy crowd seated in an auditorium. Members of the CCC are seated on stage. The crowd chants and claps its hands, disrupting the meeting. Arthur Gartland (CCC) threatens to call in the police to establish order. Shot of members of press watching videotape on the television. 0:14:03: V: Shot of DiGrazia. Dunleavy shows photos of the aftermath of violence yesterday in South Boston, including photo of a police cruiser with rear window missing. He says that the weapons on the table were used against police in South Boston yesterday. DiGrazia says that a demonstration in South Boston turned violent yesterday; that citizens of Boston have a legitimate right to stage demonstrations against busing; that the actions of some are denying the rights of others; that the governor's wife was denied her right to speak at Faneuil Hall; that a US Senator has been harassed and threatened; that a presidential candidate was denied the right to speak out last week; that parents are prevented from holding meetings. DiGrazia says that there is a conspiracy against public order in Boston; that the police will no longer be tolerant of those disrupting the rights of others. DiGrazia says that the police will protect the rights of anti-busers and pro-busers alike; that arrests will be made and violators of the law will be prosecuted. 0:18:44: V: Reporters ask questions to DiGrazia and other police officers. DiGrazia says that a small number of people in the city are using the busing issue as an excuse to pursue vandalism and mayhem. DiGrazia says that the police department took a low visibility approach to busing in 1974; that they acted more forcefully in 1975; that they have been attempting to let people demonstrate against the law; that they will be more forceful from now on. A reporter asks if there is evidence of a conspiracy against the police. DiGrazia replies that the weapons on the table are evidence of a conspiracy; that police were letting the demonstration proceed until they were attacked by the crowd.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/16/1976
Description: Boston Police Department press conference with Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Morris Allen, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. The speakers are seated at a table featuring an array of street weapons used against police in a riot in South Boston on the previous day. DiGrazia says that violence and disruptions of public order will no longer be tolerated. He says that the police department is actively investigating participants in the violence at the previous day's demonstration in South Boston. DiGrazia says that the police are gathering evidence against the South Boston Marshals and others for engaging in violent actions. DiGrazia notes that the demonstrators in South Boston knowingly violated the restrictions of their parade permit. Some drop out in the middle of the video. Reel 2 of 2.
1:00:03: Visual: Press conference with Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston), Captain Morris Allen, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. DiGrazia and the police officers sit at a table displaying bottles, rocks, pipes and bricks which were used against police in a demonstration in South Boston the day before. DiGrazia takes questions from reporters. A reporter comments that one anti-busing organization has decided to take to the streets. DiGrazia replied that statements like that will be considered conspiratorial and could be used against the organization in court. DiGrazia says that the police will use whatever force is necessary to keep order. DiGrazia says that the police department has been working with the state police and the MDC police since 1974; that the Boston police will continue to rely on those police forces for support. DiGrazia says that he is compiling facts and evidence to be presented before a grand jury; that the police will arrest those who participate in violence or who violate the civil rights of others. DiGrazia says that a parade permit was granted to demonstrators in South Boston yesterday; that the demonstrators knowingly violated the permit when they marched up to the high school to confront police. 1:02:52: V: A reporter asks DiGrazia if the police department has the support of the mayor. DiGrazia says that the mayor supports police efforts to enforce the law and protect the community. DiGrazia says that he is concerned with the lack of prosecutions of those violating the court order; that he was pleased when the US Justice Department began investigating cases in 1975; that he is particularly dismayed at the lack of prosecutions in the South Boston District Court. DiGrazia says that he does not know where the demonstrators in South Boston procured tear gas. DiGrazia says that the police is now taking a more forceful approach against disruptors of public order. A reporter asks if past policies of tolerance were a mistake. DiGrazia says that they began with a low visibility policy in September of 1974; that the policy worked in all areas of the city except South Boston; that in 1975, they changed tactics and were more forceful; that the police have been tolerant of demonstrations up until now; that they will no longer tolerate violence during demonstrations. DiGrazia says that expenses are not an issue when city residents are injured and property is damaged; that the money will be made available to the police to deal with these problems. 1:06:02: V: A reporter asks DiGrazia about how the police handled demonstrators at the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) meeting. Shot of weapons on table. DiGrazia says that police tried to take their cues from Arthur Gartland (CCC), who ran the meeting; that from now on, police will act when they think it is necessary. DiGrazia says that he has not been in contact with Judge Garrity about the change in police deparment tactics. Dunleavy adds that a list will be made available of the 80 police officers injured in yesterday's demonstration in South Boston; that 13 arrests were made at the demonstration. DiGrazia says that the police department's new policy on demonstrations will not affect the way police handle their duties in and around the schools. DiGrazia says that he will not station more police in South Boston permanently; that he will send more officers there if it is necessary. A reporter comments that demonstrators were using radios to monitor police activity. A reporter asks if police department will change radio frequencies to avoid being monitored. DiGrazia says that police department may explore other means of communications in order to avoid radios altogether. 1:09:24: V: DiGrazia invites the reporters to question the other officers who were all present at the demonstration in South Boston on the previous day. A reporter asks if it is a small group of people who are actively participating in violence. DiGrazia replies that he has seen demonstrations with as few as 150 people; that 1,000 people were present at yesterday's demonstration; that there is a group of 300-400 "hoods" who are leading the violence; that the police department is gathering evidence on the participation of the South Boston Marshals in violent acts. DiGrazia says that the police department is actively investigating actions connected to yesterday's demonstration; that he will not put a time limit on the investigation. DiGrazia thanks the media and leaves. 1:10:41: V: DiGrazia exits. Members of the media talk among themselves. Jordan talks to members of the press informally. 1:12:07: V: Judy Stoia stands next to map of South Boston. Allen refers to the map as he charts out the course of the previous day's demonstration. Allen says that one group of marchers began at the Broadway MBTA station and proceeded up West Broadway to Perkins square; that the other group of marchers began at the Andrews MBTA station and marched up Dorchester Avenue to Perkins Square;that the marchers were supposed to proceed to the Dorchester Heights Monument. Allen says that the marchers chose to march up East Broadway to G Street, heading toward the front of the high school; that there were over 2,000 marchers gathered in Perkins Square. Stoia and crew prepare to leave.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/16/1976
Description: Evening Compass late edition newscast on the first day of school during Phase II integration of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister and Paul deGive introduce the show and report that 80 arrests were made on the opening day of school. Baumeister reports that 77 members of the Committee Against Racism (CAR) were arrested for demonstrating along a bus route in South Boston. The introduction includes footage of Arthur Gartland (Citywide Coordinating Council) saying that the opening of schools was a success. Gary Griffith reports on street unrest and molotov cocktail incidents from police headquarters. DeGive reports on the opening of Charlestown High School, and on confrontations between Charlestown residents and police. DeGive reports that police motorcycles bore down with little warning on demonstrators sitting down in the middle of Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown; that a gang of youth overturned two cars in Charlestown and assaulted an African American student at Bunker Hill Community College. Baumeister reports on a peaceful opening day at South Boston High School. DeGive introduces footage of Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reporting on a successful opening day across the city. South Boston High School students in the WGBH studio Judy Stoia is in the studio with a group of South Boston High School students. Several students read prepared pieces about their experiences on the opening day of school, while one describes his experience of being an African American student bused into South Boston High School. Pam Bullard interviews Joyce Grant (Harvard University) and James Mullan (Assistant Headmaster, Roxbury High School) about the link between Harvard University and Roxbury High School. Bullard talks about the court-ordered program which pairs public schools with universities and cultural institutions. Mullan and Grant talk about opportunities for Roxbury High School students at Harvard. Bullard also interviews Dr. Herman Goldberg (US Department of Health, Education and Welfare) about his presence in Boston to oversee the opening of schools. Goldberg explains that the Boston Public School System has received the largest grant in the nation to aid in the school desegregation process. This tape has audible time code on track 2.
3:02:25: Three South Boston High School seniors sit in the studio. Ed Baumeister reports that buses from Charlestown to Roxbury High School were empty. Baumeister and Paul deGive introduce show. Credits roll. Baumeister reports that all schools will be open again tomorrow; that crews are standing by to cover any breaking news during the broadcast. DeGive reports that a number of buses (between 11% - 23%) failed to show or were late for pickups; that the school department says that transportation problems will be resolved by tomorrow. Baumeister reports that there were no injuries, suspensions or arrests in schools; that 80 people were arrested on the streets; that 77 members of the Committee Against Racism were arrested for disorderly conduct on a bus route in South Boston. DeGive reports that officials are calling the opening day a success. Visual: Footage of Arthur Gartland (Citywide Coordinating Council) saying that the schools opened successfully; that attendance was lower than projected; that police patrols assured the safety of students in schools; that he hopes attendance figures will rise. 3:04:48: Gary Griffith reports from police headquarters. Griffith reports that two white males were arrested for possession of Molotov cocktails in Roslindale; that two Molotov cocktails were thrown at the Prescott School in Charlestown; that firefighters at the Prescott School were stoned by youths who fled the scene; that a group of 60 youth were heading toward Cleary Square in Charlestown with antibusing signs; that two motorcades of 100 cars each were reported in South Boston and Charlestown; that a crowd in South Boston was throwing objects at police motorcycle units; that there is a fire at 83 Beal Street in Brookline, the birthplace of John F. Kennedy; that the fire on Beal Street may have been started by a Molotov cocktail. 3:06:52: Paul deGive reports that opening day at Charlestown High School was uneventful; that helicopters circled overhead and a sharpshooter was posted on the roof; that US Marshals were present. DeGive reports that some white students broke the boycott and attended school; that 66 African American students arrived without incident. V: Footage of media crews at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument; of a sharpshooter on the roof of Charlestown High School; of US Marshals headed toward the school; of white students entering the school; of African American students exiting buses and entering the school. DeGive reports that there were frequent confrontations between Charlestown residents and police on Bunker Hill Street; that 400 police were present; that they were kept busy dispersing crowds of residents. DeGive reports that 8 police officers on motorcycles bore down with little warning on a group of 30 demonstrators sitting down on Bunker Hill Street; that the demonstrators took refuge in the Bunker Hill Housing Project; that police and media followed the demonstrators into the housing project where angry crowds had gathered. DeGive reports that Mrs. Frank VanGorder (local resident) verbally attacked Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) for using dangerous means to break up a nonviolent demonstration. V: Footage of police officers marching down Bunker Hill Street; of officials in civilian clothes with riot helmets and nightsticks. Shots of photographs of police officers on motorcycles; of crowds gathered in front of the Bunker Hill Housing Project; of police breaking up crowds in the housing project; of police lining the streets outside of the housing project; of Charlestown teenagers sitting on wall with racist graffiti. DeGive reports that the gathered crowds were chanting Charlestown football cheers; that the demonstration was peaceful; that the police were effective on the whole, but perhaps rough during the sit-down demonstration. DeGive reports that police were taken by surprise in the afternoon, when a gang of 100 youth overturned two cars, vandalized cars at Bunker Hill Community College and beat up an African American student at the college. DeGive reports that the incident occurred as police were overseeing the end of the school day at the high school; that many residents objected to the police presence on Bunker Hill Street; that Charlestown community leaders met with Captain MacDonald to discuss the community's grievances; that Dennis Kearney (State Representative) told MacDonald that the community resented the intrusion of helicopters, the Tactical Patrol Force and hundreds of other police officers into their community; that Kearney told MacDonald that demonstrators were given no warning before police motorcycles charged them . V: Still photos of Kearney; of police motorcycles. DeGive reports that Kearney said that the media acted irresponsibly; that there were too many media crews in Charlestown. DeGive reports that African American attendance at Charlestown High School was off by 170 students; that less than half of the white students attended school. 3:10:48: Baumeister reports that the opening of South Boston High School was different this year than it was the previous year; that police and US Marshals were present; that police dispersed crowds around the school which numbered more than three people; that police scrutinized the press credentials of the media. Baumeister reports that the buses arrived late; that students were not allowed to exit the buses for several minutes; that a crowd gathered on G Street, but was kept away from the school by police. V: Footage of police and US Marshals stationed outside of the high school; of the street outside of the high school; of buses pulling up to the school; of a crowd gathered in the distance; of African American students entering the school. Baumeister reports that 78 African American students out of 432 attended South Boston High School; that 216 out of 785 white students attended. V: Footage of three white female students passing by police to enter the school; of police cars and motorcycles escorting buses out of South Boston. Baumeister reports that the school day ended peacefully; that no buses were stoned; that there were 77 arrests in South Boston; that most of the arrests were for disorderly conduct; that those arrested were arraigned in South Boston. V: Footage of African American students being interviewed after school. One student says that it was better this year than last year. 3:12:57: DeGive reports that school officials were very pleased with the opening of schools. V: Footage of Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) at a press conference at the Boston Schools Information Center. Fahey says that 162 schools opened; that the schools were prepared with learning programs for every child; that there were no arrests or suspensions; that she is optimistic about the coming school year. 3:14:16: Judy Stoia is in the studio with Eileen Sweeney (student, South Boston High School), Joan McDonough (student, South Boston High School) and Kevin Davis (student, South Boston High School). Sweeney reads a prepared piece about the opening day of school. She says that there was a heavy police and media presence; that she had to pass through metal detectors at the entrance of the school; that police and aids inside the school were friendly; that it is difficult to go anywhere in the school without a pass; that white students must wait to be dismissed from school until African American students have boarded the buses and left. Sweeney says that many white students have jobs after school; that white students should not have to wait until African American students are gone, especially if the buses are late. 3:16:37: McDonough reads a prepared piece about her day at school. She comments on police and media presence at the school, the metal detector at the entrance, and the low attendance. McDonough says that she spent the morning in the cafeteria while a counselor prepared her class schedule; that twenty students were without class assignments; that she felt some tension between white students and African American students as they waited for their class schedules; that there was little interaction between white students and African American students; that she does not think that there will ever be interaction between the two groups, "because you can't force people to be friends." 3:18:38: Judy Stoia interviews Davis about the experience of being bused into South Boston High School. Davis says that he was relieved that the police presence was not made up only of Boston police; that today was the first time he has ever been in South Boston; that he was more worried about Boston police officers than demonstrators; that some Boston police officers are not protecting the African American students; that African American students on the buses into South Boston were nervous; that there is a lot of tension in the school; that it won't take much to ignite the tension. Sweeney says that the level of tension is lower this year than during the previous year; that tension will build if the attendance numbers rise. Davis says that he got along with the white students today in South Boston. McDonough says that she believes that whites and African Americans can get along, but not in a situation where they are forced to be together. McDonough says that she went to a private school last year and got along with the "colored" people there; that the situation in South Boston is different because the two groups are forced on each other. Davis compares forced busing to an imaginary situation in which Stoia would be forced to leave WGBH and go to another station. Davis says that he feels like a pawn in a chess game; that he has no ability to make his own decisions. Sweeney says that people do not react well when they are forced to do something. Stoia points out that Sweeney and McDonough are not being bused; that nothing has been forced on them. Sweeney points out that it is difficult for students to interact normally with police present at all times; that the heavy media coverage puts pressure on the school; that it is not a normal situation at South Boston High School. Davis says that he cannot comment on whether white students and African American students at South Boston High School will get along; that each individual person is different in how they interact with others. 3:25:19: DeGive reports that only 14 white students out of 241 attended Roxbury High School today; that 165 African American students out of 322 attended; that Roxbury High School is participating in a court-ordered pairing of public schools with universities and cultural institutions; that Roxbury High School is paired with Harvard University under this program. 3:26:19: Pam Bullard interviews Joyce Grant (Harvard University) and James Mullan (Assistant Headmaster, Roxbury High School) in the studio. Bullard mentions that the idea of pairing public schools with universities and businesses is not a new one. Mullan says that a planning team of students, parents, aides, and teachers worked with members of the Harvard staff to develop programs and workshops in reading, math and computing. Grant says that Harvard provides additional resources to the schools; that the reading program focuses on communication; that students need to be able to read, analyze and communicate to excel in any subject. Grant says that she works with an assistant and a secretary on the Roxbury High School project; that she is trying to draw upon the resources at Harvard; that the staff at Harvard can learn from the project. Mullan says that the ninth grade students are clustered in order to identify their needs more quickly; that teachers work with students within the clusters; that the flexible campus program will be tied in with the Harvard programs. Grant says that Harvard would like to encourage internships and apprenticeships among the seniors; that Harvard would like to help them with training and summer jobs; that they would like to give individual attention to each senior. Grant uses the example of a student interested in the medical field. She says that the student could gain exposure to many different aspects of the medical field through an internship with the Harvard School of Medicine. Grant says that Harvard has started working on opportunities for Roxbury students through the School of Medicine. Mullan says that the teachers at the high school are enthusiastic about the program. 3:35:10: Baumeister reports that the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) has sent an official to oversee the opening of schools under Phase II desegregation. Baumeister reviews the credentials of Dr. Herman Goldberg (US Office of Education), who is in the studio with Bullard. 3:36:27: Bullard interviews Goldberg about his presence in Boston. Bullard says that the regional office of HEW has been working with the schools on desegregation; that he is in Boston to oversee the spending of federal money granted to the Boston public schools for desegregation; that he is here to give advice and support to Superintendent Fahey and her staff. Bullard explains that he was superintendent of schools in Rochester, NY, when that school system underwent desegregation; that school desegregation in Rochester was accomplished through open enrollment in schools and a resolution by the school board; that a large urban school system is never desegregated voluntarily. Bullard mentions that David Matthews (head, US Department of Health, Education and Welfare) is an outspoken opponent of busing. Goldberg says that personal opinions should not get in the way of federal law; that HEW aids school desegregation however it can. Bullard says that Boston has received the largest grant in the nation to aid in school desegregation; that the school system has received 3.9 million dollars; that Goldberg can recommend that the Boston schools receive more money if needed; that the school system needs to show that the programs are working. Bullard says that the Boston school system has had a slow start in administering programs due to changes in staff and safety concerns; that programs with the universities are moving ahead; that planning for these programs is happening behind the scenes. Bullard says that HEW evaluates programs it sponsors; that HEW does not test students; that schools often administer tests to evaluate student progress; that HEW sponsors evaluation of programs by outside organizations. Bullard says that the school system is making progress in desegregation; that he has been having discussions with Superintendent Fahey and her staff; that students arrived on opening day and began their studies; that the focus should be on educating the students. 3:45:12: Baumeister reviews the Evening Compass broadcasts for the following day. DeGive previews the stories to be covered in tomorrow's late edition. Credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/08/1975
Description: Evening Compass newscast on the first day of Phase II desegregation of Boston Schools. Ed Baumeister reports optimism on the part of city and school officials about the opening of schools. Report includes footage of Arthur Gartland (Citywide Coordinating Council) at a press conference, talking about the successful opening of the schools. Paul deGive reports on the opening day at Charlestown High School, which was peaceful despite confrontations between police and Charlestown residents on Bunker Hill Street. DeGive reports that police motorcycles bore down with little warning on demonstrators sitting down in the middle of Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown; that a gang of youth overturned two cars in Charlestown and assaulted an African American student at Bunker Hill Community College. DeGive's report includes footage of Peggy King (Charlestown resident) and Gertrude Harris (Charlestown resident). King and Harris resent the police presence in Charlestown. Judy Stoia reports on reactions to busing and police presence in the Charlestown community. Her report includes footage from an interview with a white teenager who is boycotting school. Stoia notes that Charlestown residents are frustrated at the police presence in the neighborhood. Baumeister reports on the peaceful opening of school at South Boston High School. Donovan Moore reports on opening day at Madison Park High School. Moore's report includes footage of Tom Hennessey (Acting Headmaster, Madison Park High School), talking about the first day of school in a new building. Pam Bullard reports on the successful opening day at the Solomon Lewenberg School in Mattapan. Bullard's report includes footage of Jim Pardy (Assistant Principal, Lewenberg School) talking about the successful opening of the Lewenberg School. Gary Griffith reports from the Police Department Information Center on police activities throughout the city, including the arrest of 77 members of the Committee Against Racism (CAR). Griffith notes that the CAR members were demonstrating along a bus route in South Boston. Bullard reports on the first day of school at the Condon Elementary School in South Boston. Bullard's report includes footage of interviews with Marjorie O'Brien (South Boston parent) and Katherine Ellis (South Boston parent) concerning their views on busing and school desegregation. Greg Pilkington reports on opening day at the Dearborn School in Roxbury Greg Pilkington reports on the African American community's reaction to the beginning of Phase II school desegration, and on opening day at the Dearborn School. Pilkington reports that parents complained about the poor state of the facilities at the Dearborn School. Bullard reports that opening day at Hyde Park High School was peaceful. She notes that there were complaints from local residents about the heavy police presence. Bullard's report includes a still photo of racist graffiti on a mailbox in front of the school. Baumeister reports on transportation problems involving school buses. Baumeister's report includes footage of Baumeister questioning Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) about busing problems at a press conference.
0:59:53: Baumeister introduces the show. Opening credits roll. Baumeister reports that city and school officials are very optimistic about the opening day of schools in Boston under the first year of court-ordered desegregation; that 59.2% of the projected student population attended school. Baumeister notes that Arthur Gartland (Citywide Coordinating Council) was the most objective of the officials present at a press conference today. Visual: Footage of Gartland saying that the schools opened successfully despite disruptions in some neighborhoods; that police assured the safety of the students; that he expects school attendance numbers to grow. Gartland thanks the organizations involved in the successful opening of schools, including antibusing leaders who cautioned against violence. Baumeister reports that 80 people were arrested on school-related charges; that 77 members of the Committee Against Racism were arrested in South Boston. 1:02:13: Paul deGive reports on the opening day at Charlestown High School. DeGive reports that the school opened peacefully; that there was a heavy media presence. DeGive notes that there was a police sharpshooter on the roof of the school; that helicopters circled overhead; that US Marshals were present; that African American and white students arrived at the school without incident. DeGive reports that there were frequent confrontations between Charlestown residents and police on Bunker Hill Street; that 400 police were stationed in Charlestown today; that the police were busy dispersing crowds throughout the day. DeGive reports that eight police officers on motorcycles bore down with little warning on a group of 30 demonstrators sitting down on Bunker Hill Street; that the demonstrators took refuge in the Bunker Hill Housing Project; that police and media followed the demonstrators into the housing project where angry crowds had gathered. DeGive reports that Mrs. Frank VanGorder (local resident) verbally attacked Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) for using dangerous means to break up a nonviolent demonstration. DeGive reports that the crowds quieted down after noon; that African American students boarded buses and departed from the high school without incident; that police barred residents from getting closer than 100 yards to the school. DeGive reports that while police oversaw the boarding of buses at the school, a gang of 100 youth circled around the other side of Monument Square and overturned two cars as they descended Monument Street. DeGive reports that Frank Power (headmaster, Charlestown High School) said that the atmosphere was calm inside the high school. V: Footage of buses pulling up in front of Charlestown High School; of police officers stationing themselves on the street in front of the school; of African American students boarding the buses. Footage of Power saying that today "was a normal opening at Charlestown High School." Power denies any racial tension in the school, saying defensively, "How many times do you want me to say no?". DeGive reports that Charlestown residents resented the actions of police in dispersing crowds. V: Footage of deGive interviewing Peggy King (Charlestown resident) and Gertrude Harris (Charlestown resident). King says that she thinks the police are out to hurt Charlestown residents. Hayes says that she resents police entering the housing project and telling residents to vacate the streets on which they live. DeGive reports that Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) met with Captain MacDonald to discuss the community's grievances; that Kearney told MacDonald that the community resented the intrusion of helicopters, the Tactical Patrol Force and hundreds of other police officers into their community; that Kearney told MacDonald that demonstrators were given no warning before police motorcycles charged them . DeGive reports that Kearney said that the media acted irresponsibly; that there were too many media crews in Charlestown. 1:07:05: Judy Stoia reports on reactions to busing and police presence in the Charlestown community. Stoia reports that crowds gathered early along Bunker Hill Street; that there were many students who had boycotted school. V: Shots of crowds along Bunker Hill Street; of teenagers among the crowd. Footage of a white male teenager from Charlestown saying that he will boycott school all year because of busing. Stoia reports that Charlestown residents resented the heavy police presence in the neighborhood as much as busing. V: Shots of police officers lined up in formation on Bunker Hill Street; of police motorcycles lining the street; of police officers putting an arrestee into a police van. Stoia reports that many Charlestown residents were frustrated and bitter about the police presence; that many residents predicted that crowds will gather in protest as long as the police remain in the neighborhood. 1:08:33: Baumeister reports on the opening of school in South Boston. He reminds viewers of the massive resistance to busing in South Boston during the previous year. Baumeister reports that the opening day of school this year was peaceful; that US Marshals were stationed in front of the school; that police officers kept crowds away from the street in front of the school. V: Shots of police officers stationed in front of South Boston High School; of US Marshals standing in a small group in front of the school; of a white woman entering the school yard; of two police officers descending East 6th Street in front of the school. Baumeister reports that the police dispersed groups of more than three people; that they checked the credentials of all members of the press. V: Shot of a police officer checking identification of a member of the press. Baumeister reports that the buses arrived 30 minutes late; that students were kept on the buses for several minutes. V: Footage of buses pulling up in front of the school with a police motorcycle escort; of crowds further down the street, gathered behind a police line. Baumeister reports that a crowd had gathered on G Street; that they were kept away from the school by police. Baumeister reports that 78 of 432 African American students attended South Boston High School today; 216 of 785 white students attended school. Baumeister reports that the closing of school was very orderly; that the buses left South Boston with no problems. V: Shots of African American and white students entering the school. Footage of police officers lining G street; of school buses descending G Street with a police motorcycle escort; of police escort and buses traveling along Columbia Road. Baumeister reports that 77 members of the Committee Against Racism (CAR) were arrested for disorderly conduct; that they had intended to act as a welcoming committee for African American students at the high school. Baumeister reports that the arrestees were arraigned at South Boston District Court; that the chief justice of the court insisted that the arrestees be arraigned in South Boston to show that the court was functioning. Baumeister reports that he spoke to some African American students who said that the opening day at South Boston High School was better this year than last year. V: Footage of an African American female student being interviewed. 1:10:58: Baumeister reports that many believe that school integration would work better if schools were located at neutral sites. Baumeister introduces Donovan Moore's report on Madison Park High School, located at a neutral site in downtown Boston. Moore reports that students at Madison Park High School are housed in three temporary buildings; that school began slightly late; that navigation among the three buildings can prove confusing for students. Moore reports that the opening day went smoothly; that school monitors directed students to the registration tables. V: Footage of students at the entrance of Madison Park High School; of a white male student and an African American male student waiting to receive their schedules at a registration table. Moore reports that he talked to Tom Hennessey (Acting Headmaster, Madison Park High School) about the difficulties in opening a new school at a temporary site. V: Footage of Hennessy saying that most of the school's basic furniture has arrived; that students and most of the teachers have seats and desks; that the school is lacking some other equipment. Hennessey says that the school is fully staffed; that seven or eight teachers were notified of their assignment only a few days ago; that those teachers have not had time to orient themselves to the school's program. Moore reports that the projected enrollment at Madison Park High School is 1750 students; that 640 students of 1750 chose the school as a magnet school; that about 1100 were assigned to the school. Moore reports that 600 African American students and 200 white students registered for classes at the school a few weeks ago; that 675 students attended school today; that the racial breakdown of the school population today was 152 whites, 475 African Americans and 48 other minorities. V: Footage of Hennessey saying that Madison Park High School is a magnet school; that it is located in the heart of Boston's academic and commercial communities; that the school will concentrate on career opportunities for its students. Moore asks if there is potential for trouble among students being bused in from all areas of the city. Hennessey says that there may be potential for trouble; that careful preparation by staff and a strong academic program can help to minimize any trouble. 1:13:46: Baumeister introduces Pam Bullard's report on the Solomon Lewenberg School in Mattapan. Baumeister says that the previous year at the Lewenberg school was successful; that the school staff had worked hard to recruit white students for the school; that there were several hundred white students in attendance at the end of the year. Bullard reports that opening day at the Lewenberg School was a success; that the students seemed at ease; that the school faculty had been working very hard to prepare for opening day. V: Shots of the exterior of the Lewenberg School; of two African American students gathered in the school yard. Footage of white students exiting the school and boarding buses. Bullard reports that the faculty held open houses for incoming students over the summer; that over 500 students attended the school today; that over 200 white students attended the school. Bullard reports that the school had successfully recruited white students from Hyde Park during the previous school year; that white students are being bused in from West Roxbury this year; that school official are looking forward to a successful school year. V: Shots of white students boarding buses; of white students exiting the school; of a white female student hurrying toward a bus. Footage of Bullard interviewing Jim Pardy (Assistant Principal, Lewenberg School). Pardy stands in front of a group of African American students. Pardy says that attendance at the school is good; that the first day of school is usually a bit confusing; that they had more white students on opening day this year than they had on opening day last year. Pardy says that he expects white attendance to grow; that more white parents will send their children to school when they realize that the opening day was peaceful and orderly. Pardy says that the atmosphere within the school was friendly and calm; that many students were familiar with the school after attending open houses over the summer; that many students had already met their teachers over the summer. Pardy says that this year's white students seemed much more relaxed than the white students last year; that white students may be more familiar with the school because of their visits to the open houses held at the school. Pardy says that the faculty is probably "overjoyed" that the first day was a success; that he thinks white attendance will grow. 1:16:14: Baumeister introduces Gary Griffith's report from police headquarters. Gary Griffith reports from the Police Department Information Center on Berkeley Street. Griffith sits behind a desk, flanked by a map of Boston and an American flag. Griffith reports that the Police Department Information Center was supposed to have been the best source for information on police department activity and arrests. Griffith reports that members of the media have called the center "useless" and "a waste." Griffith reports that no police officials gave briefings from the center; that Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) has not appeared at the Police Department Information Center, although he did speak at the School Department Information Center. The camera pans the the empty room. A microphone from WCVB (Channel 5) is set up on the table beside Griffith. Police communications equipment is arranged neatly on a table. Empty chairs are arranged in front of Griffith's table. Griffith reports that there were 80 school-related arrests; that 77 members of the Committee Against Racism were arrested in South Boston; that no school children were injured; that there were no mass arrests of antibusing demonstrators in South Boston or Charlestown. Griffith reports that police presence was visible across the city today; that the police were stationed outside of the South Boston District Court building on East Broadway; that South Boston Police and the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) broke up a crowd gathered at the court for the arraignment of the CAR members; that 100 members of the Massachusetts State Police Department were called in to clear a two block area around the courthouse. Griffith reports that no rocks or bottles were thrown; that police dispersed the crowd. Griffith reports that residents of South Boston and Charlestown complained of their neighborhoods looking like an "armed camp." Griffith reports that the arraignments of the CAR members were completed by the end of the day; that most of the members were released on personal recognizance and escorted out of the area. 1:18:07: Baumeister comments that Griffith looks like a "lonely man" in the empty room at the Police Department Information Center. Baumeister introduces Bullard's report on the first year of school desegregation at South Boston's elementary schools. Bullard reports that the Condon Elementary School is located near the all-white D Street Housing Project in South Boston. V: Shot of a photograph of the Condon Elementary School as seen from the D Street Housing Project. Still photos of the Condon School on D Street. A few police officers are stationed in front of the school. Bullard reports that area residents fought for 12 years to get a new school. Bullard reports that most elementary school students in the area were assigned to the Condon School attended; that those students were present at school today. Bullard reports that area students assigned to elementary schools in Roxbury were kept home by parents. V: Shots of the D Street Housing Project and the Condon School. Bullard reports that most white students were escorted to the school by parents; that parents were apprehensive about the opening day, but were happy to have their children attend a neighborhood school. V: Footage of school buses approaching the Condon School on D Street, escorted by a police motorcycles and a cruiser. White parents and students watch the buses approach. Police officers are stationed on D Street. Bullard reports that buses carrying African American students were late; that only 44 out of 230 African American students attended the Condon School today. Bullard reports that the African American students seemed wary, but interested in the presence of the police and residents; that only Massachusetts State Police officers were present at the school; that officers were posted on the roof of the school. Bullard reports that there were no shouts or heckling from residents as the African American students entered the school. Bullard reports that school officials were concerned about the safety of the students arriving at the school. V: Footage of Massachusetts State Police Department officers directing the buses as they pull up in front of the school. Footage of young African American and white students entering the school. Footage of African American students exiting a bus and entering the school. White parents stand by quietly. Bullard reports that she spoke to two white mothers with children enrolled in the school. V: Shots of Mrs. Marjorie O'Brien (South Boston parent) and Mrs. Katherine Ellis (South Boston parent). Footage of O'Brien saying that she likes having her children at the Condon School because they are close to home. O'Brien says that she has one child assigned to the Dearborn School in Roxbury; that she doubts her child will be safe at the Dearborn. O'Brien says that there were reports of children being raped in Roxbury schools last year; that her son Walter will be tutored privately at home; that she will keep her son at home unless there is an end to forced busing. O'Brien says that she believes that children should attend schools in their own neighborhoods. O'Brien's son Walter stands quietly with his mother as she is interviewed by Bullard. O'Brien says that she feels safe having her other children at the Condon School; that she feels more confident now that she has witnessed the peaceful opening of the school. Bullard asks O'Brien is she is bothered by the number of African American children attending the Condon School. O'Brien responds that she is "not really" upset by the number of African American students; that she does not mind African American students coming to South Boston, but she does not like the idea of students from South Boston being sent to Roxbury. Footage of Ellis saying that she does not like the heavy police presence in South Boston; that the police presence creates bad feelings among residents. Ellis says that residents are angry about school desegregation; that she does not know what residents will do about the busing situation. Ellis says that she is does not think there will be trouble at the Condon School; that "no one would hurt babies, black or white." 1:22:07: Baumeister reports that this year marks the beginning of Phase II school desegregation; that Phase II desegregation effects schools city-wide. Baumeister introduces Greg Pilkington's report on reactions of the African American community to the second year of desegregation. Pilkington reports that he spoke to African American parents and students outside of Roxbury's Dearborn School, near the Orchard Park Housing Project. Pilkington reports that parents were more concerned with the state of the Dearborn School facilities than with school desegregation. Pilkington says that the courtyard of the school was covered with broken glass, and that the parents talked about complaining to school officials. Pilkington reports that the parents were aware of the arrival of white students from South Boston. Pilkington notes that the African American community has been largely indifferent to the busing of white students into their neighborhoods; that white attendance in schools located in African American neighborhoods continues to be low this year. Pilkington reports that 13 out of 250 whites attended the Dearborn School today; that the white students seemed apprehensive about attending the Dearborn; that one student said that she came "because her mother made her." Pilkington reports that another white student said that she had had a good experience at the Martin Luther King School during the previous school year. Pilkington reports that African American students being bused into South Boston waited at the Bayside Mall in Dorchester; that the buses departed the mall twenty-five minutes late because police needed to assure the safety of bus routes. Pilkington reports that three police officers were stationed outside of the Dearborn; that there was no sign of any trouble. Pilkington reports that the late arrival of buses delayed the start of school at the Dearborn. Pilkington says that he spoke to a teacher who only recently learned of her assignment to the Dearborn School; that she was anxious to spend some time painting and preparing her classroom. Pilkington reports on a debriefing held by the Freedom House in Roxbury; that all were invited to help contribute to a statement to be released the following day. Pilkington says that the gathering at the Freedom House focused on how to make school desegregation work. 1:24:38: Baumeister introduces Bullard's report on the opening day at Hyde Park High School. Bullard reports that opening day was peaceful; that seven US Marshals and almost 100 police officers were present at the school this morning. V: Shot of a photograph of racist graffiti on a mailbox in front of Hyde Park High School; of a police officer and a US Marshal in front of the school. Bullard reports that there were few residents gathered outside of the school; that white students arrived without incident around 7:15am. V: Shot of a photograph of white students entering the school yard of Hyde Park High School; of the arrival of African American students on buses; of white and African American students entering the school. Bullard reports that the buses carrying African American students arrived at 7:45; that white and African American students entered the school peacefully; that metal detectors were set up at the entrance to the school. Bullard reports that the atmosphere was calm at the close of school; that neighborhood residents did not heckle the African American students as they boarded the buses. V: Shot of photographs of African American and white students exiting Hyde Park High School; of white residents standing on the street outside of the school; of African American students boarding buses. Bullard reports that Hyde Park residents complained about the heavy police presence and the number of buses in the neighborhood; that residents were glad that the atmosphere at the school was calm. Bullard reports that a group of teachers and students told her that the atmosphere inside the school was very peaceful. V: Shots of photographs of a group of three white females and one African American female outside of the school; of three white females outside of the school. Bullard reports that 539 white students and 477 African American students attended Hyde Park High School out of a projected enrollment of 1600 students. 1:25:59: Baumeister reports that 11% to 23% of buses were late or did not show up at all; that 150 students at English High School did not have any transportation to the school's Occupational Resource Center; that only 2 of 12 buses picked up students at the Martin Luther King School; that buses arrived too late for some students at the Lewenberg School; that 2 buses did not arrive to pick up students at the Lewenberg School after school. Baumeister reports that each school bus is used for three routes; that if a bus is late on the first run, it will be late on subsequent runs. V: Footage of Baumeister asking Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) about transportation problems at a press conference at the Boston Schools Information Center. Leftwich says that he expects problems with bus routes to be resolved; that School Department staff is examining the bus routes in order to identify and eliminate problems; that he expects the buses to be running smoothly tomorrow morning. Baumeister closes the show. End credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/08/1975
Description: Evening Compass newscast on the second day of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister reports on the increased presence of federal law enforcement officials in the Boston. Report includes footage of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) saying that violations of the law committed in the evening will be prosecuted as federal offenses. Baumeister also reports on school attendance. Footage of Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) expressing optimism about the climate in the schools. Greg Pilkington reports on police commitment to stricter law enforcement relating to school desegregation. Report includes footage of a press conference with Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) and J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant U.S. Attorney General). Pilkington notes that police have made few arrests relating to violence Charlestown. Footage of Pilkington interviewing Scott Harshbarger (Assistant State Attorney General), about enforcement of the school desegregation order. Paul deGive reports on a confrontation between anti-busing mothers and police in Charlestown Paul deGive reports on confrontations between Charlestown residents, and police throughout the day. The report includes still photos and coverage of a standoff between police and Charlestown mothers during a prayer march. DeGive reports that Charlestown mothers charged police officers who were blocking the path of their march. DeGive reports on a confrontation between police, members of the media and Charlestown residents outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project in Charlestown. DeGive notes that the police left the area because their presence seemed to provoke the residents. DeGive's reports includes footage of Charlestown resident chasing the media from the neighborhood. Pam Bullard reports on the atmosphere at Roxbury High School. Her report includes footage of interviews with Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) and a student who says that there is "no trouble" at Roxbury High School. Gary Griffith reports on police reaction to the increase in anti-busing violence and vandalism in the evenings. The report includes a photo of vandalism at the John F. Kennedy birthplace in Brookline. Graffiti in front of the house reads, "Bus Teddy." Judy Stoia reports on the atmosphere and programs at English High School. The report includes footage of interviews with English High School students, Chris Lane (Flexible Campus Coordinator, English High School) and Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School). Lane says that attendance has increased since yesterday. Peterkin talks about the tough academic standards at the school.
0:59:33: Audio of WGBH promotions and station identification. Baumeister introduces the Evening Compass newscast. Opening credits roll. Baumeister reports that the atmosphere in Boston schools was orderly; that nearly 2,000 law enforcement officials oversaw activities at the schools today. Bullard reports that there will be an increased federal presence in the city during the evenings. Visual: Footage of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) saying that federal rules and regulations will now apply to evenings; that violators of the law during the evening hours will be subject to prosecution under federal law. Baumeister reports that US Marshals will not patrol the streets in the evenings; that they will be on call to assist local police. Baumeister speculates as to whether the authority of the US Marshals will be able to quell disruptions on the street, which have been more frequent than disruptions in schools. Baumeister reports that attendance in schools rose today; that 49,400 students of 76,127 were present in schools. Baumeister says that police and federal officials had grim reports about confrontations with local residents in Charlestown; that Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) was optimistic. V: Footage of Fahey saying that there have been no arrests in the schools; that the climate in the schools is "excellent." Fahey goes on to give a lighthearted report of the conditions in the schools. Baumeister reports that many members of the pro-busing Committee Against Racism (CAR) were arrested in South Boston yesterday. 1:02:54: Greg Pilkington reports that police officials had promised stricter law enforcement concerning the school situation this year; that police officials had threatened to make more arrests and to prosecute arrestees more quickly this year. Pilkington notes that the safety of schoolchildren has been assured this year, even when there has been unrest on the streets. Pilkington reports that there was only one arrest in Charlestown yesterday, where a gang of youth overturned cars and beat up an African American student at Bunker Hill Community College. Pilkington adds that Charlestown residents skirmished with police throughout the day today; that there were a handful of arrests made. Pilkington reports that Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) was asked about police action in Charlestown. V: Footage of press conference at Boston Schools Information Center. Baumeister asks why there have been many arrests for minor offenses and fewer arrests for violent offenses. DiGrazia says that there have been quite a few arrests for acts of violence; that the arrests of the members of the Committee Against Racism were unfortunate; that the CAR members needed to be moved in order to avoid confrontation along a bus route; that the CAR incident was the only one in which demonstrators tried to approach a bus route or school. DiGrazia says that there were several arrests for violent incidents today; that police are more concerned with neutralizing the situation than making arrests. Baumeister asks if police restraint is the reason for the low number of arrests. DiGrazia responds that police did show restraint in attempting to control a volatile situation today. Pilkington notes that police had promised less restraint and more arrests this year. DiGrazia says that there is a difference between "low visibility" and "restraint"; that police were using low visibility tactics last year; that police continue to use restraint this year, but are making more arrests. V: Pilkington says that the police presence is definitely more visible this year. Pilkington quotes Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) as saying two weeks before that police intended to stop violence and make more arrests this year. Pilkington notes that police have not made many arrests in Charlestown, nor have they stopped the violence. Pilkington reports that federal officials have also said that they intend to enforce the law more vigorously this year. Pilkington reports that J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General) said at the press conference today that he expects the presence of FBI agents and 100 US Marshals to lead to more prosecutions under federal law. Pilkington notes that no federal charges have been filed in any of the cases being investigated by the Justice Department. V: Footage of Pilkington asking Pottinger if the youth violence in Charlestown constitutes a violation of federal law. Pottinger says that the violent activity of youth in Charlestown may constitute a violation of federal law; that attacks on police officers and fire officials are most definitely violations of federal law. Pilkington says that it is too early to predict the number of federal investigations which will result in federal charges. He notes that only 4 federal convictions resulted from 400 to 500 federal investigations last year. Pilkington reports that Scott Harshbarger (Assistant State Attorney General) will supervise the enforcement of the school desegregation order. V: Footage of Pilkington interviewing Harshbarger. Harshbarger says that the primary concern for law enforcement has been the safety of students in schools; that law enforcement has been concentrating on keeping violent demonstrators away from the schools. Pilkington notes that no arrests were made in Charlestown yesterday. He asks Harshbarger if the youth in Charlestown will feel as if they are immune from prosecution. Harshbarge says that youth in Charlestown are not immune from prosecution; that violence will not be tolerated; that the main priority right now is safety in and around the schools. Harshbarger adds that he is concerned about the youth violence. 1:09:38: DeGive reports that the morning was peaceful in Charlestown; that buses arrived at Charlestown High School without incident; that the media covering the story were fewer in number than yesterday; that there were no helicopters circling overhead. V: Shot of photographs of a female African American student looking out of the window of a bus; of Dennis Kearney (State Representative). DeGive reports that Kearney was optimistic about the atmosphere outside of the high school today; that Kearney had complained yesterday about the helicopters, the heavy police presence, and the large numbers of media. DeGive reports that DiGrazia held a brief press conference outside of Charlestown High School after the opening of the school; that DiGrazia said that police presence in Charlestown would be just as heavy today as yesterday. DeGive reports that 300 local police officers and Metropolitan District Commission police officers were stationed in Charlestown; that the Tactical Patrol Force and mounted police were on standby. V: Shot of photographs of DiGrazia speaking to reporters in front of the high school. Shot of photographs of police officers on a sidewalk in Charlestown; of officers stationed in Monument Square as a school bus passes by; of DiGrazia. DeGive reports that DiGrazia said that large groups would not be allowed to gather today in Charlestown. DeGive says that 200 antibusing mothers gathered to march on the street; that the women were stopped by a line of police; that the situation soon turned tense and ugly. DeGive reports that reporters and police were heckled by residents; that rocks and bottles were thrown occasionally at police officers and the media. V: Shot of photographs of a large group of white women sitting down in the street; of the women and police officers facing off on the street; of the media covering the confrontation. Shot of photographs of women sitting down in the street. DeGive reports that the trouble began when the group of mothers marched from Bunker Hill Street up to High Street, along the west side of the Bunker Hill Monument; that the group had grown to over 200 people when police cordoned off High Street and stopped the women from going further. DeGive reports that police ordered the marchers to walk along the sidewalk; that fathers and children complied with police while mothers sat down in High Street as a gesture of protest. DeGive reports that more police were added to the cordon in order to separate protesters from the media; that the mothers rose and demanded to be let through; that the mothers sang "God Bless America" and chanted the Lord's prayer and the "Here we go, Charlestown" refrain. V: Shot of photographs of the women gathered in the street; of street signs for Cordis Street and High Street; of the police cordon blocking the marchers' progress along High Street; of the women sitting down in the street. Shots of photographs of marchers in front of the cordon of police; of the women standing up in the street to face police; of marchers waving American flags. DeGive reports that the mothers charged the police line; that the police were ordered not to let them through, but not to hurt them. DeGive reports that the situation became rough; that males in the crowd were subject to the use of force; that two young men with the group of mothers were arrested quickly and roughly. DeGive reports that one man was dragged from the crowd with his neck locked between the body of a police officer and his nightstick; that another man was slammed against a car and subdued by five members of the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF). DeGive reports that the crowd finally chose to use the sidewalk; that the crowd moved down to the Revolutionary War-era training ground on Winthrop Street; that mothers dispersed while a group of youths challenged mounted police on the training ground. V: Shots of photographs of mothers facing off with police; of mothers pushing against the police cordon. Shots of photographs of police and officials on the street; of police officers walking in formation away from Monument Square. DeGive reports that the youths fired skyrockets at the mounted police; that one of the horses reared back and fell on a curb; that the police officer mounted on the horse was unhurt. DeGive reports that there was a lull in the action at lunchtime; that crowds gathered again near the Bunker Hill Housing Project on Bunker Hill Street around 1:30pm. DeGive reports that bus routes were changed to avoid the crowds; that the buses left Charlestown High School without incident. DeGive reports that there was a confrontation between police officers, the media, and bottle-throwing residents of the Bunker Hill Housing Project around 3:00pm; that a police lieutenant said that it was impossible to arrest those throwing bottles because they hide in the housing project. DeGive reports that the police lieutenant ordered his men away from the housing project because he felt that the police presence only provoked the residents. V: Footage of helmeted police officers crossing Bunker Hill Street and walking toward a police bus parked on Concord Street. White housing project residents yell and jeer at the departing police officers. White kids and teenagers move across the street toward the police officers and media. A station wagon passes by with "NEVER" written on the side window. DeGive reports that kids from the project crossed the street because they were attracted by members of the media; that the police departed the scene, warning the media that they would be unprotected. V: Footage of members of the press photographing the children from the projects; of the police bus departing down Bunker Hill Street. DeGive reports that the crowd grew in size after the departure of the police; that the crowd became hostile toward the media; that the media departed soon after. V: Footage of the crowd jeering at the media. Members of the media retreat up Concord Street. Audio of a man from the media saying, "C'mon, we're getting out of here." The crowd surges toward some members of the media, throwing objects. Members of the media get into their cars and pull away. The crowd throws objects at the departing members of the media. 1:15:13: Baumeister reports that white attendance at Roxbury High School has been extremely low; that 231 of 322 African American students attended school today; that 20 out of 241 whites attended school today; that 62 out of 116 other minorities attended school today. Baumeister introduces a report by Pam Bullard. Bullard reports that she spoke to white and Asian students at a bus stop in the South End; that they were not concerned about attending Roxbury High School. V: Shots of photographs of white and Asian students at a South End bus stop; of two white female freshmen. Bullard reports that two white female freshmen reported having no problems yesterday at Roxbury High School; that they were not pleased when they first heard that they had been assigned to Roxbury High School; that they had no problems yesterday and do not mind their assignment. Bullard reports that 44 Chinese American students attended Roxbury High School today; that a female Asian student said that she was happy at Roxbury High School. V: Shots of photographs of Asian students boarding the bus; of a female Asian student. Shots of photographs of Roxbury High School on Greenville Street; of a sign inside the building reading, "Welcome to Roxbury High. Have a Happy Day..."; of a freshly painted hallway inside the school; of the lunchroom; of a painted murals inside the school. Bullard reports that the busloads of students were met at the school entrance by faculty and staff; that the interior of the school has been recently painted; that the lunchroom and hallways are bright and immaculate; that some walls are decorated with artwork by the students. Bullard reports that Roxbury High School has set up innovative reading, math, and career programs in conjunction with Harvard University; that the school is collaborating with State Street Bank. V: Shots of photographs of Asian students exiting a bus in front of the school; of African American students approaching the school on Greenville Street. Bullard reports that Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) has said that this year's opening was very smooth; that Ray is optimistic about the school year. V: Footage of Bullard interviewing Ray outside of Roxbury High School. Ray says that the students this year are highly motivated; that many want to attend college; that the high school's programs can help the students develop their future plans. Ray says that most of the students are conscientious and sincere. Bullard asks Ray about how to improve the reputation of Roxbury High School. Ray says that he has invited parents to visit the school and experience how it is run; that he hopes the students from from the North End and Charlestown will take advantage of the excellent faculty and programs at Roxbury High School. Footage of Bullard interviewing Caroline Correia (student, Roxbury High School). Correia says that the school year has been good so far; that there is "no trouble" at Roxbury High School; that white students should not stay away because the school is located in an African American community. Correia says that she would like to see more white students at Roxbury High School; that more white students would probably be better for the school. 1:20:00: Baumeister reports that nighttime disturbances related to the busing crisis began the evening before schools opened this year. Baumeister introduces Gary Griffith's report from police headquarters. Griffith reports from the Police Department Information Center on Berkeley Street. Griffith sits at a desk, in front of a flag and a map of Boston. Griffith reports that US Marshals will now be available in the evenings to enforce the court order. Griffith reports that four US Marshals were present at South Boston High School two evenings ago, after a disturbance by South Boston youth. Griffith reports that there were no disturbances in South Boston during the day yesterday. He notes that there were motorcades in Charlestown and South Boston yesterday evening; that two Molotov cocktails were thrown at a school in Charlestown; that two youths were arrested for the possession of 17 Molotov cocktails in Roslindale; that an incendiary device was thrown through the back window of the John F. Kennedy birthplace in Brookline; that graffiti reading "Bus Teddy" was written on the sidewalk in front of the house. V: Shots of photographs of the JFK birthplace in Brookline; of graffiti reading "Bus Teddy," written on the sidewalk in front of the house. Griffith reports that a number of police officers were injured yesterday evening in South Boston; that the officers were punched, kicked, or hit by rocks. Griffith reports that a police officer was struck by a dart; that darts were hurled from a slingshot at police officers in South Boston yesterday evening; that windows at the South Boston District Courthouse were broken yesterday evening. Griffith reports that South Boston was very calm this morning; that only a small crowd was gathered near the high school in the morning; that there was no crowd gathered after school. V: Shots of photographs of Norman Halladay (Boston Police Department) holding a dart; of a broken window at the South Boston District Court. Shots of photographs of police and media in front of South Boston High School as buses pull up; of African American students boarding buses after school. Griffith reports that William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) reported a minor incident involving two white females and one African American female at the high school today; that Reid says that the atmosphere in the school is less tense than last year. V: Shots of photographs of Reid speaking to reporters; of African American students on the steps of South Boston High School at the end of the school day. Griffith reports Reid's remarks that adult opposition to busing is expressed in the evenings. Griffith reports that the atmosphere in the city changes during the evening hours; that city officials announced this evening that US Marshals would be standing by; that the police have prohibited motorcades. Griffith notes that the Tactical Patrol Force and the Mobile Operations Patrol are on duty tonight; that police presence will now be as heavy in the evening as it is during the day. 1:23:17: Baumeister reports that desegregation has benefitted English High School; that English High School is a city-wide magnet school with the largest fine arts department of any school; that the school is developing a drama department; that the school has a flexible campus program and is developing its partnership with the John Hancock Mutual Insurance Company. Baumeister introduces Judy Stoia's report on the school. V: Footage of buses pulling up outside of English High School; of white students exiting buses; of African American students gathered in the courtyard of the school. Audio of Robert Peterkin (Headmaster, English High School) talking about the racial tension at the school last year. Peterkin says that a white female student was looking for the gymnasium; that she began screaming when an African American male student stopped her in the hall to try to give her directions. Footage of police officers talking to Peterkin outside the school; of African American students walking toward the school. Stoia reports that English High School once had a reputation as one of the toughest schools in the city; that magnet programs are being put into place at the school; that police officers at the school spend their time directing traffic. V: Footage of white students exiting a bus and gathering in the courtyard of the school; of more buses pulling up to the school. Stoia reports that there were 651 African American students, 445 white students and ten students of other minorities in attendance today; that some students are not here voluntarily; that most students want the school year to be peaceful. V: Footage of Stoia interviewing a white female student outside of English High School. The student says that she was assigned to English High School; that she wanted to attend Brighton High School; that the school seems nice, but Brighton High School is closer to her home. Stoia interviews three African American female students. One student says that the atmosphere in the school is peaceful. A second student says that everyone gets along well; that the students will get along fine if their parents stay out of the situation. Stoia interviews Chris Lane (Flexible Campus Coordinator, English High School). Lane says that attendance at English High School has risen since yesterday; that the rise in attendance figures is probably due to the peaceful opening of school yesterday. Lane says that he is optimistic about the school year; that school buses arriving with white students from the outlying neighborhoods were full this morning. Stoia interviews two white male students from Brighton. Both students like English High School. One student likes the multi-story building and the pool. The other student likes his English and math classes. The first student says that there has been no racial tension inside the school. Footage of Peterkin saying that many students were frustrated by the interruptions in schools city-wide last year; that many students at English High School are very serious about their education; that academic requirements at English High School have been strengthened; that students do not have a lot of time to misbehave. Shot of students entering the school. 1:27:14: Baumeister closes the show. End credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/09/1975
Description: South Boston High School exterior. Background comments of pedestrians talking to camera operator and reporter. Pam Bullard interviews headmaster Jerome Wynegar on what programs his school will offer, including core curriculum and vocational education. Wynegar says racial problems have been aggravated by outside agitators. He adds that the school is enrolled to capacity, and cannot accommodate students who wish to return after dropping out. He says that the school should make sure to listen to the suggestions of the students, and those students who dropped out, to try to improve the school. He commends the faculty. Additional comments from Wynegar as they shoot cutaways. Shots of graffiti painted on pavement, which reads “Stop Forced Busing.” Several takes of reporter voice over and standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/17/1976
Description: Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Boston police and US marshals stationed outside South Boston High. Black students exit school, get on bus. Buses slowly come and go. Many officials mill about on sidewalk. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar talks to Joseph Jordan. Later, white students flow out of school en masse. Comments, some racist, from the crowd waiting outside the school can be overheard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/14/1976
Description: No audio at the beginning. The first day of school at South Boston High School during Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Helmeted members of the Tactical Patrol Force and US Marshals are present in the school yard and on the street. Exteriors of the South Boston High School building. Headmaster William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School), Charles Barry (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department), Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) and others confer on the street outside of the school. White students approach on foot. Buses carrying African American students arrive with a police motorcycle escort. Two groups of press photographers are cordoned off behind ropes in front of the school. African American students exit buses. A police helicopter circles the area.
0:00:37: Visual: Two police officers stand on a street corner in South Boston. 0:01:17: V: Helmeted police officers from the Tactical Patrol Force line up in front of South Boston High School. Police radios are audible. Shots of South Boston High School. Media and onlookers are gathered on sidewalk. US Marshals and small groups of officials are in the schoolyard and on G Street in front of the high school. Police question a student as he enters schoolyard. 0:04:04: V: A group of police officers walk into the street and continue down the hill on East 6th Street. Three African American students exit a police car and walk into the schoolyard. William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School), Peter Meade (Mayor's Office), Charles Barry (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department), and others converse in the street in front of the school. Two white students enter the schoolyard. Police are stationed at entrance of school; students enter. 0:06:06: V: Police line the streets. A group of three white students enters the schoolyard. 0:06:46: Helicopter noise is audible. V: Schoolbuses with police motorcycle escort are visible down East 6th Street, making their way toward the school. A station wagon arrives; three women and a police officer help a student out of the wagon. Four school buses with a police escort pull up in front of the school. Shots of the news media cordoned off behind a rope on either side of the entrance to the schoolyard. Several African American students enter schoolyard. A group of students exit a bus prematurely. The students are told to get back on the bus by an official. Shots of buses lined up; of helicopters overhead. Officials converse on street. African American students exit buses and enter schoolyard. Shot through a crowd of the front entrance of the school.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/08/1975