Description: Marcus Jones reports that a group of African American teenagers have created an anti-violence tele-play called "A Second Chance," which will air on the Boston Neighborhood Network. Jones notes that the teenagers spent the summer rehearsing, writing and recording the video, with encouragement from counselors from the Dorchester Counseling Center. Jones reports that the 30-minute video takes a stand against drugs and violence. Jones' report includes footage from an interview with Maxine Rawlins (Dorchester Counseling Center). Rawlins says that parents, teachers, and peer counselors can use the video in discussions about violence. Jones' report also includes interviews with teenagers involved in making the video. The teenagers talk about the video and their efforts to turn others away from violence. Jones notes that the lives of many of these teenagers have been touched by violence. Jones' report includes footage from the video, footage of a teenager performing a rap song, and footage from the funeral of teenager Kingsley Allen who was killed at Boston High School.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage from the Boston Neighborhood Network of a video made by African American teenagers from the Dorchester Counseling Center. The video is called A Second Chance. Marcus Jones reports that a group of African American teenagers have created a tele-play called A Second Chance. Jones notes that the teenagers are trying to send a message to other teenagers about stopping violence. V: Footage of Tanachee Babbitt (student) being interviewed. Babbitt says that kids need to stop killing other kids. Babbitt says that the violence needs to stop or there will be no one left. Footage of a group of African American teenagers being interviewed. One teenage boy says that anyone can have a second chance. A teenage girl says that people should not waste those second chances. Shots of the teenagers. Jones reports that the teenagers were encouraged by counselors at the Dorchester Counseling Center; that the teenagers spent the summer writing, rehearsing, and recording the video. Jones notes that the video was recorded at the Roxbury studio of the Boston Neighborhood Network. V: Footage of one of the teenagers performing a rap song. Jones reports that the video will premiere on the Boston Neighborhood Network tomorrow; that the video speaks is 30 minutes long; that it speaks out against drugs and violence. Jones reports that the cast members do not think that the video alone will stem the violence in their community. V: Footage of Babbitt sitting at a table with two teenage boys. Babbitt says that it is easy to send a message while making people laugh at the same time. Footage of Maxine Rawlins (Dorchester Counseling Center) being interviewed. Rawlins says that the video will not make people suddenly turn away from drugs and violence. Rawlins says that she hopes that the video will make people think twice before engaging in these activities. Footage of a teenage boy sitting with Babbitt at a table. The boy says half-seriously that he and the others can make a difference. Babbitt laughs. Shot of Jones. Jones reports that each of these teenagers has been touched by violence; that each has experienced the death of a friend or family member. Jones reports that the father of one of the boys was killed in a street robbery; that a funeral was held yesterday for Kingsley Allen (Babbitt's brother). V: Shots of one of the teenage boys; of the funeral service for Allen. Jones reports that Allen was stabbed to death by another teenager at Boston High School. V: Footage of Babbitt being interviewed. Babbitt says that her brother was "a bad boy." Babbitt says that she talked to her brother about the video project; that her brother had talked to her about trying to end his violent lifestyle. Babbitt says that her brother was killed two days after speaking to her. Footage of Rawlins saying that she would like to make a guide to go along with the video; that parents, teachers and peer counselors can use the video in discussions about violence. Footage from the video, A Second Chance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/18/1990
Description: Hope Kelly reports on the removal of Judge Paul King, who was a former Chief Justice in the Dorchester District Court, from his position at Dorchester District Court. The State Supreme Court demoted King for misconduct in and out of court, including sexist remarks, racist standards for setting bail, and for public drunkenness. Kelly reviews the incidents leading to King's demotion. King was transferred to Stoughton District Court, where he is only allowed to sit on civil cases. Kelly's report includes shots of newspaper articles covering the story and footage of lawyers, clerks, and defendants in a courtroom.
0:59:53: Visual: Shot of the exterior of Dorchester District Court. Hope Kelly reports that Paul King (judge) was a judge for nearly twenty years at Dorchester District Court. Kelly notes that the Dorchester District Court is the busiest court in the system; that King was chief justice at the court for eleven years. Kelly reports that the State Supreme Court removed King in 1987; that King was transferred to Stoughton District Court. Kelly notes that King is only allowed to sit on civil cases at Stoughton District Court. V: Shots of a newspaper article with a photo of King. The headline reads, "Dorchester court has a history of trouble." Shot of another newspaper article with a photo of King. The headline reads, "Judge banned from Hub court." The article lists incidents of objectionable behavior by King. Kelly stands in front of the Dorchester District Court. Kelly notes that King made objectionable comments to battered women and Vietnam veterans in the courtroom. Kelly reports that King engaged in offensive behavior outside of the courtroom. V: Shots of a sign for Nanina's restaurant; of the exterior of Nanina's restaurant; of the parking lot of the restaurant. Kelly reports that King often went to Nanina's restaurant in Dorchester in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Kelly reports that the Judicial Conduct Commission found that King became visibly intoxicated regularly at Nanina's restaurant. Kelly notes that witnesses told the Commission that King frequently and openly urinated in the parking lot of the restaurant. Kelly reports that a court clerk testified that King set an unusually high bail amount for four African American defendants in 1982; that the clerk testified to King saying that African Americans deserve high bails for voting against his brother. Kelly notes that Michael Dukakis (former governor of Massachusetts) beat Ed King (brother of Paul King and former governor of Massachusetts) in the 1982 gubernatorial election. V: Shots of a clerk looking through court paperwork; of an audience in a courtroom; of lawyers, clerks, and defendants in a courtroom. Shot of a police officer and a clerk going through paperwork. Kelly reports that the media has covered the story intensely; that some judges say that King is a victim of the system. Kelly reports that some judges says that King's behavior is a sad reflection of the stresses under which the judges work.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/01/1991
Description: Meg Vaillancourt talks to students at the Martin Luther King Middle School in Dorchester about their opinions of Nelson Mandela (black South African leader). The students tell what they know of Mandela's life and struggle. Two students compare Mandela to American civil rights leaders Martin Luther King, Jr. and to Malcolm X. Some students talk about whether violence should be used to further one's goals. The students agree on the importance of fighting for equality. They are united in their admiration for Mandela. Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of Nelson Mandela and Winnie Mandela (wife of Nelson Mandela) greeting crowds in South Africa.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Meg Vaillancourt (WGBH reporter) talking to students in the library of the Martin Luther King School in Dorchester. Vaillancourt asks how many students have heard of Nelson Mandela (black South African leader). All of the students raise their hands. Vaillancourt reports that Mandela had already been jailed for fifteen years when these students were born. V: Black and white shot of Mandela as a young man. Vaillancourt notes that the middle-school students knew a lot about Mandela. V: Footage of an African American male student saying that Mandela fought against apartheid in South Africa. Footage of another African American male student saying that Mandela is the leader of "the black congress" in South Africa; that he was accused of participating in the bombing of a government building in South Africa. Footage of Nelson Mandela and Winnie Mandela (wife of Nelson Mandela) exiting an airplane onto a runway in Johannesburg. Nelson Mandela and Winnie Mandela wave at supporters. Vaillancourt reports that Mandela has been in the news since his release from prison. Vaillancourt notes that the students had heard of Mandela from their parents and friends; that the students recognized Mandela in thirty-year-old photos. V: Shot of Vaillancourt in the library with the students. Black and white shot of Mandela as a young man. Footage of an African American male student saying that Mandela reminds him of Martin Luther King (American civil rights leader). Footage of another African American male student saying that Mandela reminds him of Malcolm X (American civil rights leader). Footage of another African American male student says that black people need to fight for equality; that black people should use violence if non-violence does not work. Footage of an African American female student saying that violence should be avoided if possible. Footage of an Asian American female student saying that segregation in the US is like apartheid in South Africa. The student says that the people united to end segregation in the US. Footage of an African American male student saying that there are other ways to achieve goals besides violence. Footage of an African American male student saying that he would like to teach the South African goverment to trust black South Africans. Shots of the middle-school students sitting with Vaillancourt in the library. Vaillancourt reports that she spoke to students ranging in age from eleven to fifteen. Vaillancourt notes that the students believe that Americans can learn from Mandela's struggle. V: Footage of an Asian American female student saying that people need to fight for their rights sometimes; that there is a price to be paid. Footage of an African American male student saying that forgiveness is important; of another African American male student saying that Mandela showed patience and endurance during his struggle. Shot of Nelson Mandela raising his fist and smiling for the media.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/13/1990
Description: David Boeri reports that Mayor Ray Flynn is considering a curfew for teenagers in the city of Boston, in the wake of the murder of Kimberly Ray Harbor on Franklin Field. Review of the details of Harbor's murder and scenes of the murder suspects entering a courtroom. Boeri notes that the curfew would prohibit teenagers from being on the streets after 11:00 pm on weeknights and after 12:00 am on weekends. Interview with a group of pre-adolescent African American boys about the curfew. The boys are playing basketball on an outdoor court. They discuss gang activity and violence in their neighborhood, and say that the curfew is a good idea because it will protect people from violence on the streets. Boeri notes that many teenagers declined to be interviewed for the report.
1:00:11: Visual: Shots of a color photo of Kimberly Ray Harbor (murder victim); of a group of police and city officials gathered on Franklin Field. Shot of a Boston Herald newspaper with a headline reading, "Eight teens charged in brutal 'wilding' murder." David Boeri reports that Kimberly Ray Harbor was murdered on Franklin Field in Dorchester on the evening of October 31, 1990. Boeri notes that Harbor was robbed, raped, cut, and stabbed over 100 times. Boeri reports that the suspects are teenagers and gang members; that five of them are under the age of sixteen. V: Shot of three teenagers entering a courtroom. Shot of a group of teenagers playing street hockey outside of a housing development. Boeri reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) is considering a curfew for teenagers in Boston. Boeri reports that the curfew would prohibit teenagers from being on the streets after 11:00 pm on weeknights and after 12:00 am on weekends. V: Shots of a group of African American kids playing basketball on an outdoor court near the Franklin Field Housing Project. Boeri notes that many teenagers declined to be interviewed for this report. V: Footage of Boeri interviewing a group of pre-adolescent African American kids. Boeri asks them about the problems in their neighborhood. The kids answer as a group. They talk about fights between gangs, vandalism, and violence. Boeri reports that the kids are afraid of gang members; that the kids go home early each night. V: Footage of Boeri interviewing the kids. Boeri asks how many teenagers in the neighborhood are gang members. The kids answer as a group. The kids says that most of the teenagers belong to gangs. Boeri reports that the kids told him that teenagers are asked to join gangs at age sixteen; that gangs sometimes recruit teenagers under the age of sixteen. Boeri reports that the kids he spoke to were around the age of thirteen. Boeri notes that the group of kids liked the idea of a curfew. V: Footage of Boeri talking to the kids. One of the boys says that a curfew is a good idea. Boeri asks if people get into trouble if the stay out too late. The boy says yes. Another boy says that gang members will shoot you for no reason if you walk by them at night. The boy says that the gang members will think that you belong to another gang. Boeri asks them if they will obey the curfew in three or four years. One of the boys says yes. Another boy says that he will be out playing basketball; that he and his friends will mind their own business. Shots of the boys playing basketball. Boeri notes that it is a short distance from the basketball court to the street corner; that it is a short distance from safety to trouble. Boeri reports that proponents of the curfew are trying to protect younger children from the violence of the streets.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/21/1990
Description: Alexandra Marks reports that Paul Tsongas addressed the members of the Organization for a New Equality (ONE) at a luncheon meeting. ONE is an organization committed to opening up new economic opportunities for minorities. The members of ONE welcomed Tsongas' pro-business, liberal agenda. Tsongas criticized the policies of George Bush in his speech and has accused him of promoting a racially divisive agenda. Tsongas is calling for a combination of tax incentives and government spending to revitalize inner-city neighborhoods. Interview with Robert Reich (professor, John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University) about Tsongas' position on economic issues and education. Interview with Tsonga, who talks about the importance of education. Interviews with Dorchester residents Chico Joyner and Faries Odom about Tsongas.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Paul Tsongas (Democratic candidate for US President) at a luncheon for ONE (Organization for a New Equality). Tsongas walks to the podium as attendees applaud. Alexandra Marks reports that Tsongas is not known as a passionate speaker; that Tsongas showed his passion at a speech to ONE members. Marks reports that Tsongas spoke about the budget approved by the Massachusetts State Legislature. Marks notes that the State Legislature is controlled by Democrats. V: Footage of Tsongas addressing the attendees. Tsongas says that his generation will be the first to give less to their children than they got. Tsongas says that his generation should be uncomfortable with this state of affairs. Tsongas says that the legislators should not congratulate themselves for balancing the budget by ruining the schools. Shots of attendees at the luncheon. Marks reports that the attendees welcomed Tsongas' pro-business, liberal agenda. Marks reports that ONE is committed to opening up new economic opportunities for minorities. V: Footage of Tsongas addressing the attendees. Tsongas says that a politician needs to be "pro-business" in order to be "pro-jobs." Tsongas says that Democrats need to learn that it is hypocritical to be "pro-jobs" and "anti-business." Marks reports that Tsongas berated George Bush (US President) for championing ideology over common sense in supporting the previous day's Supreme Court ruling on abortion. Marks notes that the ruling upholds a federal regulation which forbids the mention of abortion in clinics where federal funds are used. V: Shots of Tsongas speaking; of attendees; of a cameraman at the conference. Marks reports that Tsongas chided Bush for using the racially divisive Willie Horton advertisement in the 1988 presidential campaign. Marks reports that Tsongas chided Bush for vetoing the Civil Rights Bill and for sabotaging efforts to salvage the bill. V: Footage of Tsongas addressing the attendees. Tsongas says that Bush opposed the Civil Rights Bill because he wants race to be an issue in the 1992 campaign. Marks stands on Blue Hill Avenue. Marks says that Tsongas is calling for a combination of tax incentives and government spending to revitalize inner-city neighborhoods. Marks says that Tsongas believes that government money is necessary to leverage private investment. Marks says that economists have mixed feelings about Tsongas' philosophy. V: Footage of Robert Reich (John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University) being interviewed by Marks. Reich says that the private sector in the US is globalizing quickly. Reich talks about the foreign activities of IBM and General Electric. Reich says that the government needs to be selective in its support of the private sector; that the government should not support companies who create jobs outside of the US. Marks reports that Reich believes that the key to economic development is to enhance the productive capabilities of individual Americans. V: Footage of Reich being interviewed by Marks. Reich says that education and infrastructure are important. Reich says that Tsongas emphasizes these things in his proposal. Footage of Tsongas being interviewed. Tsongas says that there is no future without education. Marks reports that some inner-city residents are supportive of Tsongas. V: Shots of Blue Hill Avenue. Footage of Chico Joyner (Dorchester resident) being interviewed. Joyner says that most people will rebel against a tax increase. Joyner says that new businesses would help the community. Footage of Faries Odom (Dorchester resident) being interviewed. Odom says that community involvement is crucial to the success of any initiatives in the neighborhood. Footage of Tsongas addressing attendees at the ONE luncheon. Tsongas says that all people are connected to one another; that people's actions have an affect on themselves and others. Marks reports that Tsongas intends to send this message during his presidential campaign; that Tsongas wants to fight against the racially divisive agenda of the Bush administration. V: Shot of Tsongas riding down an escalator with attendees. An African American man shakes his hand and wishes him luck.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/24/1991