Description: Interviews with Arab students at local college. They discuss the prejudice they experience and their conflicting loyalties in the Persian Gulf war. They say people should not be targeting Arabs, Muslims, or Iraqis in general, but Saddam Hussein.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/22/1991
Description: Christy George interviews Maria LeBron about her experiences as a tenant in Boston's public housing, specifically in the Mission Hill Housing Project. George notes that LeBron is one of 370 tenants who have been compensated for the discriminatory policies of the Boston Housing Authority (BHA). The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and a federal court found the BHA policies to be discriminatory. The Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights filed a lawsuit on behalf on tenants. LeBron talks about how she was placed on a waiting list for an apartment even though there were empty apartments in housing projects in South Boston and Charlestown. She talks about the discriminatory policies of the BHA. LeBron says that it is very difficult to be homeless. She adds that people of color should not be afraid to challenge government agencies. George reports that nearly 1,000 people are eligible for settlement money from the BHA.
1:00:11: Visual: Footage of Maria LeBron (public housing tenant) calling to her children in the courtyard of the Mission Hill Housing Project. LeBron takes one of her children by the hand. She walks with along with them toward one of the buildings in the development. Christy George reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) placed LeBron in the Mission Hill Public Housing Project three years ago. George notes that LeBron is Puerto Rican; that LeBron's neighbors are Puerto Rican and African American. George reports that the BHA used to assign tenants by race; that LeBron was forced to wait for a long time to be placed in an apartment. George adds that LeBron signed up for public housing after the city condemned the building in which she was living; that LeBron was six months pregnant. V: Footage of LeBron sitting in her apartment with her two sons. LeBron says that she wondered why the BHA took so long to place her in an apartment. LeBron says that she knew that there were empty apartments. LeBron says that she waited three months before being placed in an apartment. Shots of LeBron working in the kitchen of her apartment. George reports that LeBron spent three months shuttling between a homeless shelter and the Milner Hotel. George notes that BHA apartments in Charlestown and South Boston sat empty while LeBron waited for an apartment. V: Shot of one of LeBron's sons sitting on the floor of the apartment. A toy car is in the foreground of the shot. George reports that LeBron was assigned to an apartment in Mission Hill two weeks before her baby was born. V: Shot of LeBron's two sons in the kitchen with her while she works. Footage of LeBron being interviewed by George. LeBron says that she noticed that there were no white families in the housing project where she was placed. LeBron says that a neighbor told her that the BHA only places white families in Charlestown and South Boston; that there are no white people outside of those two areas. LeBron says that she thinks that is wrong. Shots of LeBron in the kitchen with her sons. LeBron gets some chocolate milk for one of her sons. Shot of the boy drinking from a small bottle of chocolate milk. George reports that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and a federal court ruled that the BHA housing policies were discriminatory. George reports that the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights filed suit on behalf of the NAACP and tenants. V: Shots of Lebron giving her other son a cup of milk. Shot of an $500 invoice made out to LeBron from the BHA. George reports that LeBron received $500 from the BHA yesterday; that LeBron will receive a total of three checks as compensation for the discriminatory practices of the BHA. George notes that she will receive two more checks for $250. V: Shot of LeBron and her two sons on the couch. Footage of LeBron being interviewed by George. LeBron says that the BHA learned an expensive lesson. LeBron says that there are many people who do not have homes. LeBron says that it is hard to be homeless; that homeless people do not know where they will go for their next meal or for shelter. LeBron says that she wanted a home. Shot of the housing development from a window in LeBron's apartment. George reports that LeBron is one of 370 people who have been compensated for the BHA's discriminatory policies. George notes that nearly 1,000 more people are eligible for settlement money. George notes that these people will be hard to find; that some do not speak English; that others may be afraid to collect. V: Shot of three people standing at the entrance to one of the development buildings. Footage of LeBron being interviewed by George. LeBron says that many people of color are intimidated by large government bureaucracies like the BHA. LeBron says that people should not be intimidated, especially if they are in the right. Shot of LeBron handing each of her sons a coin. LeBron stands near a bureau. George reports that LeBron will use her first check to bring her sons to Puerto Rico for a visit to their grandparents. George notes that LeBron would like to attend college in the future to study law. George adds that LeBron has already won her first case. V: Shot of LeBron following her sons out of a room in the apartment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/02/1990
Description: Christy George reports that poor Boston neighborhoods lack access to banking services. Banking leaders met with community leaders today to announce an agreement that will provide better banking services to poor neighborhoods. George reviews the details of the agreement, which will provide bank branches, loans, and increased investment to poor neighborhoods. At the meeting Richard Pollard (Massachusetts Bankers Association) says that redlining did not take place in the 1980s. Charles Stith (Organization for a New Equality), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), Willie Jones (Community Investment Coalition), John Hamill (Shawmut Bank),Ronald Homer (Boston Bank of Commerce), and Michael Dukakis all speak out in favor of the proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Julian Bond at Harvard University and Christopher Lydon interviews Sarah Small
1:00:06: Visual: Aerial shot of Somerville. Shot of residents walking on a street in Roxbury. Shots of street signs for Blue Hill Avenue and Dudley Street; of a Western Union office in Roxbury; of signs in the window of the Western Union office. Shot of a man walking into the Western Union office. Christy George reports that poor communities lack access to banking services. George reports that Boston banks have few branches in poor communities. V: Footage of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) at a gathering of Massachusetts bankers. Dukakis shakes hands with meeting attendees. George reports that Dukakis outlawed the practice of redlining in the 1970s; that bankers and business leaders were upset about the law. George says that poor communities still lack banking services in spite of the law. George reports that Dukakis has supported a program to get banks to give better service to poor communities. V: Footage of Dukakis standing with banking leaders and community leaders at the meeting. Footage of Richard Pollard (Massachusetts Bankers Association) saying that he will not admit that redlining has been taking place in the 1980s; that redlining is illegal. Shots of banking leaders and community leaders socializing. George says that banking leaders met with community leaders today. George reports that banking leaders have agreed to open 10 to 15 new branches of downtown banks in poor neighborhoods over the next five years; that banking leaders have agreed to open 20 to 35 new ATM machines in poor communities. George reports that banking leaders have agreed to restructure mortgage programs; that the new program will grant mortgages to families earning as little as $27,000 per year. George reports that the banks will participate in a $100 million affordable housing pool to finance renovation and construction of affordable housing. George reports that bank leaders will support a $10 million corporation which will direct investments to minority-owned businesses. V: On-screen text details the specifics of the agreement between bank leaders and community leaders. Footage of Charles Stith (Organization for a New Equality) at the meeting. Stith encourages the leaders to join hands and raise them in the air. The leaders raise their hands and say "Amen." Stith stands next to Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council). Shots of Dukakis and other leaders. Shots of the media; of Stith. George reports that the leaders need to decide how to monitor progress; that both sides were optimistic about the plan. V: Footage of Stith speaking at the meeting. Stith says that it has taken a long time to reach an agreement. Footage of Bolling speaking at the meeting. Bolling says that the agreement is like "a Catholic marriage"; that there is no divorce. Footage of John Hamill (Shawmut Bank) speaking at the meeting. Hamill says that the agreement is not like a new marriage; that the agreement is "a renewal of vows." Footage of Ronald Homer (Boston Bank of Commerce) speaking at the meeting. Homer says that "the only way to say 'I love you' in business is with money. Footage of Dukakis saying that the agreement is "fantastic." George says that the agreement was reached when communication between the two sides improved. V: Footage of Pollard speaking at the meeting. Pollard says that the community used to have the feeling that the banks had unlimited funds with which to provide mortgages. Pollard says that the banks needed to explain their business model to the community. Footage of Willie Jones (Community Investment Coalition) speaking at the meeting. Jones says that the banks have realized that poor communities are looking for basic services instead of "bells and whistles." George stands in a residential neighborhood. George reports that banking rules have made it difficult for poor people to qualify for loans and mortgages. George reports that banks have restructured their rules to allow access for poor people. George notes that the banks will make money in poor communities; that they will not make as much money as in wealthy communities.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1990
Description: Interview with Beverly Sills on experiencing prejudice as woman directing an opera company and how the world is changing to allow women more opportunities. She comments on opera as expensive art form and how she tried to make quality opera that all people could afford, and that if specific opera communities are catering to the elite, she thinks the consumer can "make a lot of noise" and help to change that. She also mentions censorship in the arts and Robert Mapplethorpe. Clips of Sills singing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1991
Description: Hope Kelly reports that more than a dozen students at Harvard Law School have filed a lawsuit which charges the school with discriminatory hiring practices. Kelly notes that Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) supports the lawsuit, but thinks it will be difficult to win. Kelly reports that Bell has taken an unpaid leave of absence from the school to protest the lack of diversity among the faculty. Kelly interviews Bell. Bell talks about the culture at Harvard Law School and about the need for a diverse faculty. Bell says that he has taken a leave of absence because it is important to make sacrifices in order to advance one's beliefs. Kelly reports that Bell is teaching a seminar called "Civil Rights at the Crossroads." She notes that Bell is not paid for the course and that the students receive no credit. Kelly's report includes footage of Bell and his students in class. The students discuss the importance of diversity at the school. Kelly notes that there are three African Americans and five females among the sixty-six tenured professors at Harvard Law School. Kelly reports that the school has failed to provide a set of role models reflecting the diversity of the student body.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) teaching a class. Hope Kelly reports that Derrick Bell is one of sixty-six tenured professors at Harvard Law School; that only two of Bell's colleagues are also African American. Kelly notes that there are no Asian, Latino or Native American professors at the school; that there are no African American female professors at the school. V: Footage of Bell's class. A white female student says that the school needs a woman of color on the faculty in order to provide a wider perspective on issues of women in international development and on issues of human rights. Shots of students in the class. Kelly reports that more than a dozen Harvard Law School students have signed on to a lawsuit which charges the school with discriminatory hiring practices. Kelly reports that many experts think the lawsuit will be difficult to win. V: Footage of Bell being interviewed by Kelly. Bell says that US courts only understand race discrimination if it is obvious. Bell says that Harvard Law School has not prohibited African American women and other minorities from being hired onto the faculty. Bell says that Harvard Law School will not hire a professor who does not share the Harvard culture. Kelly reports that the culture at Harvard Law School is overwhelmingly white and male.. Kelly notes that only five of the sixty-six tenured professors are women. V: Shots of students in Bell's class; of Bell's hands as he makes gestures while speaking. Footage of Bell being interviewed by Kelly. Bell says that all professors teach a perspective; that all professors have a worldview. Kelly reports that students in Bell's class think that their perspectives are being "whitewashed." V: Shots of students in the class. Footage of an African American male student saying that diversity and quality do not have to be mutually exclusive. Shots of Bell at the front of the class. Kelly reports that Bell's seminar is called "Civil Rights at the Crossroads." Kelly reports that students have flocked to the class. Kelly notes that the students receive no credit for the course; that Bell receives no salary for teaching the course. Kelly reports that Bell is on unpaid leave. Kelly reports that Bell says that he will stay on leave until a woman of color is hired onto the faculty. V: Shots of Bell and the students in class. Footage of Bell being interviewed by Kelly. Bell says that he is a teacher; that teachers teach best by example. Bell says that he has always tried to teach law students about the importance of taking risks and making sacrifices. Bell says that real success stems from standing up for one's beliefs. Bell says that he must practice what he teaches. Kelly reports that Bell is passing up a salary of more than $100,000 per year. Kelly notes that Harvard Law School has continued to provide him with his office, a secretary and a classroom in which to teach. Kelly reports that Harvard Law School has failed to provide a set of role models which reflect the diversity of the student body. V: Shots of students walking on the campus of Harvard Law School. Shots of Bell in the classroom; of an African American female student in Bell's class.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/03/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) has announced that he will take a voluntary leave of absence from Harvard Law School until an African American female is granted tenure. Vaillancourt notes that Harvard Law School has only five tenured female professors and three tenured African American male professors on staff. She adds that the student body is 25% minority and 40% female. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Bell speaking at a student demonstration. Bell makes his announcement. Bell adds that it is necessary to make sacrifices to advance one's beliefs. Students applaud Bell. Many students hold protest signs. Three students address the demonstrators. They talk about the lack of minority faculty. Vaillancourt's report also includes footage of Louis Kaplow (Associate Dean, Harvard Law School) speaking at a press conference. Kaplow defends the school's record of minority hiring. Vaillancourt notes that Bell does not know if his act of conscience will have any effect on the school administration. Vaillancourt's report includes footage from May 1988, of Harvard Law School students occupying the dean's office to protest the lack of minority faculty. Following the edited story is additional footage of the demonstration, including law student Barack Obama introducing Derrick Bell.
1:00:09: Visual: Footage of Harvard Law School students at a demonstration outside of Harvard Law School. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Harvard Law School counts fifteen Supreme Court Justices among its alumni; that tenure is granted only to the academic elite. Vaillancourt reports that Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) is a tenured professor who has announced his departure. V: Shot of a student at the demonstration. Footage of Bell at the demonstration. Bell says that he will remove himself from the Harvard payroll as a "sacrificial financial fast." Bell says that he is not trying to coerce his colleagues; that he is trying to honor a commitment to those responsible for his presence at Harvard. The students applaud. Shots of the media and students at the demonstration. Vaillancourt reports that Bell was the first African American to be granted tenure at Harvard; that he was granted tenure in 1969. Vaillancourt reports that Bell has decided to take a leave of absence until an African American female is granted tenure. V: Footage of Bell saying that students have already enrolled in his classes; that he can ill afford to live for a year without his salary. Bell says that he he has urged students to take risks to further their beliefs; that he must do the same. Shots of students holding a sign reading, "Where are our tenured black women professors?" Shots of students applauding for Bell; of female students holding signs reading, "Come out of the ivory tower" and "No education without representation." Vaillancourt reports that approximately 500 students are supporting Bell's decision; that student are urging alumni to boycott Harvard's current fundraising drive. V: Footage of an African American female student addressing the crowd of demonstrators. She says that Robert Clark (Dean of Harvard Law School) has plans to improve the school by building a new library; that he should instead improve the school by making the faculty more diverse. The students applaud. A white male student holds a sign reading, "reflect reality." Footage of a Latina female student saying that Bell has set an example for all of the students. The student says that she has not role model at the school; that there are no Latino or Latina professors on the faculty. Footage of an African American female student addressing the demonstrators. The student says that people must make sacrifices to advance their cause. Shot of Bell outside of a Harvard Law School building, with chanting demonstrators. Vaillancourt reports that Bell is giving up a salary of more than $100,000 per year. Vaillancourt notes that students have staged sit-ins to protest the lack of minority faculty; that the issue has been contested for nearly twenty years. V: Footage from May, 1988 of a student sit-in at the dean's office in the administration building of Harvard Law School. Students study textbooks as they occupy the office. Vaillancourt stands on the campus of Harvard Law School. Vaillancourt reports that there are 1600 students at Harvard Law School; that nearly 25% are minority students; that nearly 40% are women. Vaillancourt notes that the Harvard Law School faculty has 5 tenured female professors and three tenured African American male professors. V: Footage of Louis Kaplow (Associate Dean, Harvard Law School) speaking at a press conference. Kaplow says that Harvard Law School only hires a few people each year; that some years they do not hire anyone. Kaplow says that positions at Harvard Law School are often permanent; that hiring decisions are made carefully and cautiously. Vaillancourt reports that Kaplow spoke at a press conference after Bell's announcement. Vaillancourt notes that Kaplow does not believe that Harvard Law School will make any significant changes to its hiring practices. V: Shots of student demonstrators in the audience of the press conference. The demonstrators stand together, raising linked arms. Some demonstrators hold protest signs. Footage of Kaplow saying that Harvard's hiring has been fully 50% minority and women over the past eight to ten years; that Harvard's job offers have been fully 50% minority and women over the past eight to ten years. Kaplow says that Harvard is making an effort; that Harvard has kept some positions empty in an effort to locate minority and women candidates. Shots of the students at the press conference. Shots of student demonstrators marching outside a Harvard Law School building. Vaillancourt reports that Bell does not know if his act of conscience will have any effect on the school's hiring record; that Harvard will have only two tenured African American professors if Bell leaves. V: Shots of student demonstrators with linked arms upraised. Footage of Bell addressing the demonstrators. Bell says that he hopes that student persistence will prevail for those minority candidates who deserve to be on the faculty. Bell says that hopes to be able to remain on staff if the students succeed.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/24/1990
Description: Hope Kelly reports on the removal of Judge Paul King, who was a former Chief Justice in the Dorchester District Court, from his position at Dorchester District Court. The State Supreme Court demoted King for misconduct in and out of court, including sexist remarks, racist standards for setting bail, and for public drunkenness. Kelly reviews the incidents leading to King's demotion. King was transferred to Stoughton District Court, where he is only allowed to sit on civil cases. Kelly's report includes shots of newspaper articles covering the story and footage of lawyers, clerks, and defendants in a courtroom.
0:59:53: Visual: Shot of the exterior of Dorchester District Court. Hope Kelly reports that Paul King (judge) was a judge for nearly twenty years at Dorchester District Court. Kelly notes that the Dorchester District Court is the busiest court in the system; that King was chief justice at the court for eleven years. Kelly reports that the State Supreme Court removed King in 1987; that King was transferred to Stoughton District Court. Kelly notes that King is only allowed to sit on civil cases at Stoughton District Court. V: Shots of a newspaper article with a photo of King. The headline reads, "Dorchester court has a history of trouble." Shot of another newspaper article with a photo of King. The headline reads, "Judge banned from Hub court." The article lists incidents of objectionable behavior by King. Kelly stands in front of the Dorchester District Court. Kelly notes that King made objectionable comments to battered women and Vietnam veterans in the courtroom. Kelly reports that King engaged in offensive behavior outside of the courtroom. V: Shots of a sign for Nanina's restaurant; of the exterior of Nanina's restaurant; of the parking lot of the restaurant. Kelly reports that King often went to Nanina's restaurant in Dorchester in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Kelly reports that the Judicial Conduct Commission found that King became visibly intoxicated regularly at Nanina's restaurant. Kelly notes that witnesses told the Commission that King frequently and openly urinated in the parking lot of the restaurant. Kelly reports that a court clerk testified that King set an unusually high bail amount for four African American defendants in 1982; that the clerk testified to King saying that African Americans deserve high bails for voting against his brother. Kelly notes that Michael Dukakis (former governor of Massachusetts) beat Ed King (brother of Paul King and former governor of Massachusetts) in the 1982 gubernatorial election. V: Shots of a clerk looking through court paperwork; of an audience in a courtroom; of lawyers, clerks, and defendants in a courtroom. Shot of a police officer and a clerk going through paperwork. Kelly reports that the media has covered the story intensely; that some judges say that King is a victim of the system. Kelly reports that some judges says that King's behavior is a sad reflection of the stresses under which the judges work.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/01/1991
Description: Story on the lack of openly gay republican, focusing on Michael Duffy, a gay Republican running for state representative. Duffy at his house talking to his partner. Interview with Duffy on his position on gay political issues. Duffy holds a candidates night. Interviews with Republicans Steven Pierce, Paul Cronin, and William Weld on their views on gay rights legislation. Weld and Duffy shake hands.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/01/1990
Description: Marcus Jones interviews Brian Wright O'Connor, the Managing Editor of The Bay State Banner, about the negative media portrayal of the Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan area. Jones notes that O'Connor believes that the media focus only on images of violence, drugs, and murder. O'Connor talks about the effects of the negative media coverage. Footage from an interview with Boston Police Deputy Superintendent William Celester about negative media coverage of the community. Jones notes that gubernatorial candidate John Silber was recently criticized for making negative comments about the Roxbury community. Silber has accused columnist Mike Barnacle of giving a biased representation of life in many neighborhoods. Jones' report is accompanied by footage from a news story with Barnacle, by footage from Justice on Trial (WCVB-TV) and by footage from Street Cop (WGBH/Frontline documentary). Jones notes that politicians and community leaders have spoken out against media bias in the wake of the Carol Stuart murder case. Michael Dukakis talks about media bias at a press conference. Following the edited story is additional footage of Jones's interview with O'Connor. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: John Silber speaks to the media and Roxbury residents
1:00:25: Visual: Footage of news reports from local TV stations. John Henning (WBZ news anchor) reports on the murder of a woman in the city. Natalie Jacobson (WCVB news anchor) reports on a police search for suspects in two Roxbury shootings. Shot of police searching two suspects who are lying face down on a sidewalk. R.D. Sahl (WHDH news anchor) reports on growing outrage in Roxbury. Shot of a woman being taken from a home on a stretcher. Shots of police cruisers on the streets of Roxbury at night. Shot of an injured person in an ambulance; of police at a crime scene cordoned off by yellow tape. Shot of an African American man leaving a police station. Marcus Jones reports that media coverage of the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan neighborhoods focus on images of violence, drugs, and murder. Jones reports that Brian Wright O'Connor (Managing Editor, The Bay State Banner) believes that the media does not provide an accurate portrayal of life in Roxbury. Jones notes that O'Connor lives in a quiet section of the Roxbury neighborhood. V: Shot of Jones and O'Connor walking through a quiet park. Footage of O'Connor saying that criminal activity should be covered by the media; that the media uses questionable tactics in covering crime. O'Connor says that the media often stretches its definition of the term "news." O'Connor questions if there is balanced news coverage of the greater Roxbury area. O'Connor says that the media come to Roxbury to cover crime; that the media comes to Roxbury to cover reactions of local residents to comments by white politicians. Footage of William Celester (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) saying that media coverage creates the wrong perceptions about the community. Celester says that negative perceptions did not begin with the comments of John Silber (Democratic candidate for governor of Massachusetts). Celester says that the negative perceptions need to be changed. Footage from WCVB of Justice on Trial. The footage shows Joe Lally (Boston Police Department) walking toward a city courthouse. The narrator says that Lally is "the only symbol of civilization left on many city streets." Marcus Jones reports that Silber has accused the media of twisting his words; that Silber says that the media has skewed perceptions of reality in Area B neighborhoods. Jones notes that Silber accused Mike Barnacle (columnist) of giving a skewed portrayal of life in many neighborhoods. V: Shot of Mike Barnacle interviewing a white man outside of a building. Footage of Barnacle walking along a sidewalk. Barnacle compares the neighborhood to a "shooting gallery." Jones reports that he interviewed Barnacle by telephone. Jones reports that Barnacle says that he feels no obligation to balance negative coverage of a neighborhood with positive coverage. Jones notes that Barnacle could not recall the number of columns he has written this summer with positive coverage of the neighborhoods in Area B. V: Footage from a WGBH/Frontline documentary called Street Cop. A plain-clothes police officer rides through a housing development. The officer says that the neighborhood is a tough place. The officer says that he would probably end up selling drugs if he were a poor, African American teenager in this neighborhood. Footage from Street Cop of white, plain-clothes police officers breaking down the door of an apartment with sledgehammers. A police officer reaches down the shirt of an old woman to look for drugs. Jones notes that WGBH/Frontline produced a documentary called Street Cop three years ago; that the documentary was accused of using negative stereotypes of crime in Roxbury. Jones reports that politicians and community leaders have spoken out against media bias in the wake of the Carol Stuart murder. V: Shots of newspaper articles with headlines about the suspect in the Stuart case. Footage of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) speaking at a press conference on April 11, 1990. Dukakis says that there are thousands of good kids in the community; that the media gives all of the news coverage to the 500 bad kids. Bernard Cardinal Law (Archidiocese of Boston) is seated behind Dukakis. Footage of O'Connor being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks if the media focus on crime leads to a reduction in crime. O'Connor says that the community has been stereotyped by the media; that negative stereotypes reduce the political will to address the underlying socio-economic problems. O'Connor says that these negative stereotypes imply that the citizens of the community are morally defective or undeserving of aid. O'Connor says that the biased media coverage is "pernicious." O'Connor says that the negative media coverage allows people with resources to turn away from the community. O'Connor notes that two large companies scrapped their plans to build facilities in Roxbury in the wake of the Stuart murder. O'Connor says that the two companies could have provided jobs for at-risk teenagers in the community.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/12/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson visited Harvard Law School to join student protests over the school's minority hiring practices. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson supports Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School), who has announced that he will leave his post to protest the school's poor affirmative action record. Derrick Bell is Harvard's first African-American tenured professor. Vaillancourt reports that there are only five tenured female professors and three tenured African American male professors out of sixty-one tenured professors at the school. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Jackson addressing students at the school. Barack Obama is seen among students in the background. Jackson shakes hands with Bell and condemns the school's affirmative action record. Vaillancourt notes that the school administration has refused Jackson's offer to act as a mediator on the issue. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson accused Harvard Law School of institutional racism and sexism. She adds that Robert Clark (Dean, Harvard Law School) issued a statement defending the school's hiring practices. Vaillancourt's report features footage of Bell at a student demonstration at Harvard Law School in April 1990 and footage of Jackson at a student demonstration. This tape includes additional footage of Jackson addressing demonstrators at Harvard Law School.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) speaking at Harvard Law School. Jackson says that affirmative action is a response to years of denial by law. Shots of the audience listening to Jackson in a lecture hall at the school. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson's visit to Harvard Law School attracted national attention to the controversy over the school's minority hiring practices. V: Footage of Jackson addressing the audience. Jackson says that it is an error and an insult to say that there is no African American woman qualified to be a tenured professor at Harvard Law School. Shots of the audience. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson visited the school to support Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School). Vaillancourt notes that Bell was the first African American to be granted tenure at Harvard Law School. Vaillancourt reports that Bell has announced that he will leave his post to protest the school's poor affirmative action record. V: Shot of Jackson and Bell shaking hands in the conference hall. Footage from April 24, 1990 of Bell at a demonstration on the campus of Harvard Law School. Bell addresses student demonstrators. Bell says that he he has urged students to take risks to further their beliefs; that he must now do the same. Shot of demonstrators holding a sign reading, "Where are our tenured black women professors?" Vaillancourt reports that Bell will take a leave of absence until the school adds a woman of color to the faculty. Vaillancourt notes that there are 61 tenured professors at the school; that three of those professors are African American; that the African American professors are all male. Vaillancourt reports that half of the students at Harvard Law School are women; that there are only five tenured female professors; that there are no Latino or Asian law professors at the school. V: Shots of Bell and Jackson entering the lecture hall; of students standing and applauding for Bell and Jackson. Shots of white and African American female students in the audience. Shot of Jackson, Bell and a white woman raising linked arms at the front of the lecture hall. The students applaud. Vaillancourt reports that the school seems ready to accept Bell's departure; that Robert Clark (Dean of Harvard Law School) declined to speak on camera about the school's hiring practices. Vaillancourt reports that Clark issued a statement in which he defended the slow pace of change at Harvard Law School. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has accused Harvard of institutional racism and sexism. V: Shot of students demonstrators on the Harvard Law School campus on April 24, 1990. Footage of Jackson addressing student demonstrators outside on the campus of Harvard Law School. Student supporters stand behind him. Jackson says that Harvard should negotiate with Bell and the student demonstrators. The demonstrators applaud Jackson. Vaillancourt stands outside of a building on the Harvard Law School campus. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson met briefly with Clark today; that the school has refused Jackson's offer to act as a mediator on the issue of faculty diversity. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson called for a reexamination of race relations in the US during his speech at Harvard Law School. V: Footage of Jackson addressing an audience in a lecture hall at Harvard Law School. Jackson says that most people in the world are not white nor are they males. Jackson says that these people cannot wait for some archaic standard to allow them to be appraised as worthy by white males. Shots of students in the audience. Shot of Jackson entering a room. Jackson shakes hands and embraces Bell. Jackson shakes hands with other Harvard Law School professors and officials. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has called for a new Kerner Commission; that the Kerner Commission issued a study twenty years ago which concluded that white America and black America were separate and unequal. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson praised Bell for his courage; that Jackson called on Harvard Law School faculty to support Bell. V: Footage of Jackson addressing an audience in the lecture hall. Jackson talks about the sacrifices made by Rosa Parks (civil rights activist) and Martin Luther King (civil rights leader). Jackson says that Bell is taking a principled stand; that Bell is drawing attention to the problem of racism and sexism at Harvard. Shots of Bell at a demonstration on the Harvard Law School campus on April 24, 1990. Shots of Bell addressing a demonstration outside of a building on the Harvard Law School campus today. Jackson stands beside Bell. Student demonstrators stand behind them. The demonstrators raise their linked arms. A demonstrator holds a sign reading, "diversity now." Vaillancourt reports that faculty were scheduled to vote today on a resolution encouraging diversity. Vaillancourt notes that Harvard officials say that a personal matter forced the dean to end the meeting before the resolution came to a vote. Vaillancourt notes that the vote was not rescheduled.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/09/1990
Description: Carmen Fields reports that Dr. James Williams, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will fast each Wednesday in April outside of the office of the president of MIT. Williams is protesting the lack of diversity among the faculty at MIT. There are fourteen African Americans in a faculty of 900 professors. Interview with Williams, who talks about the role of professors as role models and the need for a diverse faculty. He says that he is trying to encourage minority students to fight for change. Interview with MIT spokesperson Ken Campbell, who talks about the university administration's efforts to hire more minority faculty. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the annual Black/Jewish Seder supper
0:59:01: Visual: Footage of Dr. James Williams (professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) being interviewed. Williams says that his mother inspired his current protest actions. Williams talks about his mother as a sensitive and caring person. Carmen Fields reports that Williams will fast and work outside of the office of the president of MIT. V: Shots of the door of the president's office; of Williams working at a table near the door. Footage of Williams being interviewed. Williams says that minority students must act; that minority students must not be discouraged by institutional intransigence. Williams says that minority students must act decisively to effect change. Shot of Williams working at the table outside of the president's office. Fields reports that Williams is an MIT graduate; that Williams is dissatisfied with the lack of African American faculty at the school. Fields notes that there are fourteen African American faculty members in a faculty of 900 professors. V: Shot of a building on the MIT campus. Shot of Williams speaking to a group of students of color. Fields reports that Williams believes that African American students and all students need African American role models. V: Footage of Williams being interviewed. Williams says that he is trying to be a role model for minority students through his protest. Williams says that professors are role models even if they do not want to be. Williams says that professor can choose what kinds of role models to be. Fields reports that MIT believes that Williams has reason to protest. V: Footage of Ken Campbell (MIT spokesperson) being interviewed. Campbell says that the university agrees with Williams; that there are too few minority faculty members. Campbell says that two more African American faculty members have been hired since Dr. Charles Vest (president, MIT) became president of the university. Campbell says that the school needs to make more progress. Fields reports that Williams believes that protest is still necessary. V: Footage of Williams being interviewed. Williams says that people must still act in the face of slow-moving institutions. Williams says that people must not give up in defeat.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/03/1991
Description: Meg Vaillancourt opens report with person on the street interviews on quotas, affirmative action, and civil rights. Vaillancourt interviews Avi Nelson (radio talk show host) and Dianne Wilkerson (attorney) about the debate concerning minority hiring quotas as a part of civil rights policy. Vaillancourt notes that George Bush vetoed a Civil Rights Bill last year because he said the bill would encourage the use of quotas by employers. Nelson opposes affirmative action programs and quotas. Nelson says that the Civil Rights Bill compromises the rights of some in order to benefit others. Wilkerson says that quotas were never a part of the Civil Rights Bill as it was written. Wilkerson says that the Civil Rights Bill would allow women and people of color to file lawsuits in cases of discrimination. Wilkerson accuses the Republican Party of bringing up quotas in order to undermine the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Vaillancourt reports that the future of the bill remains uncertain. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of George Bush speaking in October of 1990 and footage of construction workers at a construction site. Vaillancourt's report also features footage from interviews with people on the street about minority hiring quotas. This tape includes additional footage from From Montgomery to Memphis. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Controversy surrounds David Duke's visit to Boston and Carmen Fields reports on the history and present activities of the Ku Klux Klan
1:00:06: Visual: Footage of a white man being interviewed on the street. The man says that African Americans claim to have been discriminated against for many years. The man says that now it is "every man for himself." Footage of a white woman being interviewed at Downtown Crossing. The woman says that businesses should not be required to hire a certain number of minorities; that equal rights are important. Footage of an African American woman being interviewed on the street. The woman says that there is a assumption that people of color and women cannot compete with white men; that this assumption gives quotas a bad name. Shots of people walking through Downtown Crossing. Meg Vaillancourt reports that the majority of people interviewed today at Downtown Crossing opposed job quotas. Vaillancourt asks if job quotas are the issue when it comes to civil rights. V: Footage of Avi Nelson (radio talk show host) being interviewed. Nelson says that quotas are not part of civil rights. Nelson says that people who get jobs because of quotas keep out other people who are more qualified to do the job. Footage of Dianne Wilkerson (attorney) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Wilkerson says that she does not understand all of the controversy surrounding job quotas. Wilkerson that no one has publicly admitted being forced to hire people of color or women. Vaillancourt reports that Wilkerson believes that Republicans use the term quotas because they know that the word has a negative connotation. Vaillancourt reports that Wilkerson prefers the term "remedy." V: Footage of Wilkerson being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Wilkerson says that there is no "quota bill." Wilkerson says that there is a bill to restore the civil rights of women and people of color. Wilkerson says that Supreme Court decisions of the late 1980s had a devastating impact on the ability of women and people of colors to file lawsuits in cases of discrimination. Vaillancourt reports that Nelson is a republican; that Nelson opposes the ideas of affirmative action. V: Footage of Nelson being interviewed. Nelson says that the grievances of history can never be fully redressed; that it is impossible to achieve a state of equality for all people. Nelson says that the government should commit itself to granting equal opportunity for all in the structure of the laws from this day forward. Nelson says that the government cannot remedy the disadvantaged backgrounds of certain individuals. Footage of George Bush (US President) speaking on October 22, 1990. Bush says that he has long been committed to affirmative action. Vaillancourt reports that Bush vetoed a Civil Rights Bill last year. Vaillancourt notes that Bush said that the bill would encourage the use of quotas by employers. Vaillancourt reports that the word "quota" never appeared in the Civil Rights Bill vetoed by Bush. Vaillancourt notes that the bill shifted the burden of proof onto employers; that employers would need to show that they did not discriminate. Vaillancourt adds that an Congressional effort to override Bush's veto failed by a handful of votes. V: Footage of workers at a construction site. Shot of a worker moving dirt in a wheelbarrow. The worker dumps the dirt outside of a building. Shots of workers digging holes at a construction site. The workers are of diverse races. Footage of Wilkerson being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Wilkerson says that supporters of the Civil Rights Bill were not advocating quotas; that quotas were never mentioned in the legislation. Vaillancourt remarks that some people call job quotas the "Willie Horton" of civil rights. Wilkerson agrees with Vaillancourt's remark. Wilkerson says that Bush and David Duke (Louisiana state representative) are in agreement. Wilkerson says that the Republican Party is trying to distance itself from Duke; that the Republican Party and Duke are in agreement on this issue. Footage of Nelson being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Nelson says that the Republican Party has a problem with Duke; that the Democratic Party has a problem with Louis Farrakhan (leader, Nation of Islam). Nelson says that he occasionally agrees with Duke; that he does not embrace Duke as fellow traveler. Nelson says that opponents of the bill do not want to deny civil rights of US citizens. Nelson says that the bill would compromise the civil rights of some in order to give benefits to others. Vaillancourt reports that Democrats in the US House of Representatives have tried to rename the bill this year in order to change the tone of debate; that House Democrats are emphasizing its benefits for white women. Vaillancourt reports that Democrats fear that they will again be accused of promoting quotas. Vaillancourt reports that Senate Democrats have not yet proposed a new bill; that Senate Democrats fear a repeat of last year's debate and Republican victory.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/28/1991