Description: Thomas Saltonstall (Area Director, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) speaks at a press conference to mark the opening of a Boston office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall discusses the EEOC's commitment to the elimination of race discrimination in employment and to equal opportunities for women, older workers and minorities; he announces the initiatives planned by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will focus on voluntary compliance. Saltonstall discusses statistics illustrating the underrepresentation, or "opportunity gap," in the employment of women in management and of minorities in the city's overall work force. Saltonstall presents statistics illustrating the "opportunity gap" for minorities in the printing/publishing industry, the communications industry, investment companies, brokerage firms, and retail stores. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of Boston's minority workers in lower-paying jobs. Tape 1 of 2
1:00:05: Visual: A federal official from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the US Department of Labor stands at a podium speaking to the media at a press conference on the opening of a Boston office of the EEOC. The official commends Thomas Saltonstall (Regional Director, EEOC) and the General Services Administration (GSA) for the design and effective use of space in the new EEOC office. Shot of the EEOC seal on the front of the podium. The official says that the EEOC is committed to equal treatment and access for all citizens; that minorities and women must be given an equal opportunity to advance themselves in the workplace. The official talks about the need for society to renew its commitment to civil rights. The official thanks the audience. Shot of audience members. 1:05:16: V: Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall talks about the need to redress the employment opportunity gaps which exist for minorities in Boston. Saltonstall says that he will focus on race discrimination in employment; that the EEOC is also committed to equal opportunities for women, older workers and other minorities. Saltonstall announces the initiatives which will be taken by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will promote a program of voluntary compliance with the statutes; that the EEOC will expand its services to the public; that the EEOC will focus on eliminating broad patterns and practices of employment discrimination; that the EEOC will focus on improving the quality and impact of the lawsuits filed. Saltonstall notes that he does not want to preach or embarass anyone. 1:08:23: V: Saltonstall defines the term "opportunity gap." Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap existing in 1980 for women as officials and managers in the Boston area. Saltonstall says that Boston rates among the lowest of six cities in a survey measuring the percentage of women in managerial positions. Saltonstall notes that minorities make up 29% of the labor force in the city of Boston; that minorities make up only 8% of the work force in the metropolitan area; that this disparity is greater in Boston than in any other major city. Saltonstall explains that the metropolitan figure of 8% has been used to calculate opportunity gaps; that the metropolitan figure is low when applied to businesses in the city. Saltonstall defines minorities. Saltonstall explains how the statistics were compiled. 1:13:58: V: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap for minorities in the business of security/commodity brokerage. Saltonstall explains that individual companies will have performances which are better or worse than the average. Saltonstall notes that an unnamed private company in the Boston area has been targeted for enforcement action by the EEOC; that the unnamed company employs between 500 and 1000 employees; that all of the employees are white and only 3 employees are women. 1:15:28: Visual: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the underrepresentation in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented as office workers and sales workers. Close-up shot of chart indicating statistical representation of minorities in jobs in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall says that many employers have claimed that they cannot find qualified minority employees to hire. Saltonstall says that there is not a shortage of qualified minority employees for low-paying clerical and sales positions. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in the communications industry and other industries between 1970 and 1982. Close-up shot of the chart illustrating statistical representation of minority workers in the communications industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented in all white collar job categories in the communications industry except for office/clerical jobs. Saltonstall adds that many major companies in the communications industry failed to report statistics to the EEOC; that private employers are required by law to report statistics to the EEOC. 1:17:13: Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in food stores between 1970 and 1982. Saltonstall says that the statistics are "appalling"; that minority workers are underrepresented in all positions except as laborors and sales workers. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating representation of minority workers in investment companies. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap for minorities in investment companies widened between 1970 and 1982; that hiring for managerial positions tripled, while the number of minority workers in those positions decreased. Saltonstall notes that minority workers are underrepresented in all white collar jobs except for clerical positions; that all of the laborors working for investment companies are white; that all of the companies represented by the statistics are located within the city of Boston. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating minority worker representation in general merchandise stores. Saltonstall says that the retail industry should be hiring more minority workers because a significant share of their income comes from minority shoppers. Saltonstall notes that the opportunity gap for minority workers in general merchandise stores widened between 1970 and 1982; that the minority participation rate in the industry has declined since 1970. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of minorities in lower-paying jobs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1984
Description: Thomas Saltonstall (Regional Director, EEOC) speaks at a press conference to mark the opening of the Boston office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Saltonstall calls for an end to employment discrimination against minorities; he remarks that minorities in Boston are concentrated in low-paying jobs. Saltonstall refers to charts illustrating the under representation of minorities in office/clerical and sales positions. Saltonstall advocates affirmative action programs and discusses the EEOC's intention to pursue litigation against companies that continue to discriminate in their employment practices. Saltonstall says that minority underemployment is a problem in the Boston area. He defends and explains the intended function of affirmative action programs.Saltonstall discusses the under representation of minorities in the public sector and some pending investigations against employers in the Boston area. Saltonstall describes the realtionship between the EEOC and the Civil Rights Commission; he talks about EEOC enforcement of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. A reporter asks if employers are receiving mixed messages from a conservative federal government and a more liberal EEOC. Saltonstall says that businesses should comply voluntarily with EEOC guidelines and explains the importance of goals and timetables in a voluntary compliance program. Saltonstall says that discrimination exists in the New England region even though there are fewer minorities in northern New England. Saltonstall says that he does not know of a city with worse statistics regarding job discrimination. Tape 2 of 2.
1:00:01: Visual: Thomas Saltonstall (Regional Director, EEOC) stands at a podium speaking to the media at a press conference on the opening of a Boston office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Saltonstall notes that minorities in Boston are better educated than in other areas of the country; that minorities in Boston are more likely to be concentrated in lower-paying jobs. Saltonstall refers to charts indicating industries which underutilize minorities in office/clerical and sales positions. Saltonstall calls for an end to job discrimination and job segregation. Saltonstall says that some Boston employers may not want to hire minority workers to represent their companies in sales positions; that racial discrimination is unacceptable. Saltonstall says that the problems of job discrimination and the underemployment of minorities must be solved; that action must be taken in the face of these complex problems. Saltonstall notes that advances in the elimination of job discrimination in Boston have been made only through litigation; that the EEOC will pursue litigation to this end; that employer efforts including voluntary affirmative action programs and voluntary compliance with the law will bring about change more quickly. Saltonstall talks about the necessity and importance of affirmative action programs. Saltonstall refers to EEOC guidelines for employer affirmative action programs. Saltonstall notes that affirmative action is a "remedy" for discrimination; that affirmative action programs are not discriminatory. Saltonstall adds that the EEOC wants to work with employers to promote diversity and to end job discrimination. Saltonstall says that Clarence Thomas (Chairman, EEOC) has initiated a voluntary assistance program to help employers understand federal anti-discrimination statutes. Shots of audience members. Saltonstall announces that an EEOC symposium will be broadcast to Chambers of Commerce across the nation. Saltonstall says that he hopes that voluntary compliance will be the norm in Boston; that the EEOC will pursue litigation if necessary. 1:09:21: V: Saltonstall answers questions from the audience. Saltonstall talks about the problem of underemployment of minorities in the greater Boston area. Saltonstall says that the problem is caused by inadequate attention to the problem and by discriminatory practices; that the problem is widespread in Boston. Saltonstall says that the underrepresentation of minorities in the public sector is a problem; that the mayor and the governor are committed to redressing the problem. Saltonstall says that the EEOC is pursuing investigations of employers in the Boston area; that he will not discuss the employer(s) against whom the EEOC will file suit. Saltonstall talks about the relationship between the EEOC and the Civil Rights Commission. Saltonstall talks about the EEOC's enforcement of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Saltonstall reads a section of Title VII to the audience. 1:13:32: V: A reporter asks if employers are getting mixed messages from the EEOC and from a more conservative federal government. Saltonstall says that employers should be paying attention to the EEOC instead of other government agencies. Saltonstall says that many cases are settled before litigation is filed. Saltonstall says that voluntary compliance by private employers is important; that the EEOC does not have the resources to pursue every case. Saltonstall notes the presence in the audience of directors from several civil rights enforcement agencies from across New England. Saltonstall says that there are fewer minorities in northern New England; that discrimination exists in the region. Saltonstall does not say that Boston is the "worst city in the nation" in terms of job discrimination. Saltonstall says that he does not know of a US city with a worse problem. Saltonstall says that the 1983 mayoral elections created a dialogue about race in the city; that it is important to take action to solve the problem of job discrimination; that voluntary compliance programs are an effective in resolving the problem. Saltonstall explains the importance of goals and timetables in a voluntary compliance program. Saltonstall explains that statistics for the metropolitan area can be skewed because of the low number of minorites living in the suburbs; that he does not know if Boston is the "worst city in the nation" in terms of this problem.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1984
Description: Interview with Tufts sociologist Peter Dreier on “interlocking directors.” He explains that the composition of corporate boards is limited largely to white males who do not represent those affected by their policy choices. Women, poor people and ethnic minorities are excluded and their interests are not protected. The “old boys” network makes decisions that perpetuate each other's wealth inasmuch as the same small group of men are on the boards of all the large Boston banks, utilities and big businesses. There are conflicts of interest. Nuclear power plants were endorsed and financed by such groups though they are found to be unsafe and unprofitable. Dreier calls for demographically broadening board membership and raising corporate consciousness about welfare of the community. Explains the way banks redlining creates slums. Dreier says that there should be a Freedom of Information Act for big business, like there is for the government.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/06/1983