Description: Lee Nelson introduces The Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Nelson reads a news brief about US Army testing of live bacteria on civilians in simulated germ warfare attacks. Art Cohen reports on racial controversy during jury selection in the Andrew Puopolo murder trial. Cohen reports that the defense attorneys have accused the prosecution of excluding African Americans from the jury. Gary Griffith reports on Mayor Kevin White's proposed fiscal legislation. The report includes footage of Jim Young (Treasurer, City of Boston) explaining the fiscal package. Steve Curwood reports on George Bush's address to the Middlesex Club of Republicans. The report includes footage of Bush answering questions about his tenure as CIA Director, biological warfare, and the overthrow of foreign governments. Mike Kolowich reports on Thomas Widmer (Vice President, Thermo Electron), who advocates energy efficiency and conservation through the application of technology. Footage of Widmer talking about technology and energy policy. Christopher Lydon comments on the early days of the Carter presidency and Carter's outspoken position on human rights. Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Steve Nevas hosts the Ten O'Clock News. Nevas reports on the possibility of peace talks in the Middle East. Lydon interviews Richard Reeves (political writer) on Jimmy Carter's character and his public image. Nevas editorializes on US policy regarding marine resources. Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Nevas closes the show. David Ives (President, WGBH) sings a fundraising song for on-air fundraising promotion
0:00:10: Volunteers in studio for on-air fundraising. WGBH station identification. 0:01:12: The Ten O'Clock News opening credits. Lee Nelson introduces the show. Nelson reports that the US Army has tested live germs on civilians in simulated germ warfare attacks from 1949 to 1969; that the Pennsylvania Turnpike, the City of San Francisco and Washington's national airport were targets over a twenty-year period; that over 500 project employees suffered infections. Nelson reports that four jurors were chosen in the trial of three men connected with the death of Harvard football player Andrew Puopolo. 0:02:16: Art Cohen reports on the Puopolo murder trial at Suffolk Superior Court. Visual: Artist's drawing of courtroom. Cohen reports that Puopolo had been in the Combat Zone with fellow Harvard football players Thomas Lincoln and Steve Saxon; that Lincoln and Saxon suffered only minor injuries; that Puopolo died of stab wounds. Cohen reports that Richard Allen, Edward Soares and Leon Easterling are charged with Puopulo's murder; that the three defendents are African American. V: Artist's drawing of defendants. Cohen reports that Judge James Roy asked each prospective juror if the racial profiles of the defendents and plaintiffs would affect their judgment; that Roy dismissed several jurors who were unsure. V: Artist drawing of Roy by Sonja Benson. Cohen reports that there were only four African Americans out of 70 prospective jurors; that the defense lawyers accused the prosecution of excluding African Americans from the jury; that Thomas Mundy (Assistant District Attorney, Suffolk County) challenged three of the African American jurors without cause; that the fourth African American juror was dismissed by Roy. V: Artists drawings of lawyers at table; of Mundy. Cohen reports that three women and one man have been chosen for the jury so far; that these four jurors are an electronics engineer, a manager with a local insurance company, a school monitor, and a housewife from South Boston. Cohen reports that jury selection is expected to go on until Thursday. 0:03:48: Nelson reads the national headlines: the US House of Representatives voted to pass a major segment of President Jimmy Carter's economic stimulus program, including $50 tax rebates for many taxpayers; Carter will travel to London in May for his first summit with leaders from Canada, West Germany, France, Italy, Japan, and Great Britain; France threatened economic reprisals unless the SST (Concorde) is allowed to land in New York; Carter favors granting temporary landing rights for the Concorde, but the decision is up to the states of New York and New Jersey. 0:04:39: Nelson reports that the White Administration is concentrating on the passage of its fiscal legislation; that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is on vacation on an unnamed Caribbean island. V: Footage of James Young (Treasurer, City of Boston) saying that the mayor's fiscal legislation addresses the management problems in the city; that it attempts to redress imbalances in the fiscal relationship between the state and the city; that it enables the city to improve its financial situation by allowing it to impose modest taxes. Gary Griffith reports that the fiscal package includes 28 bills broken into three major categories; that there are 11 bills in a revenue sharing package which increases city fines and parking fees, and denies registration to vehicles with unpaid fines and taxes; that there are 10 bills in a state share package which mandates the state to assume the costs of county government, of school desegregation and of veteran benefits; that there are 7 bills in a new tax package which includes a payroll excise tax and new excise taxes on hotels, motels and college dorms. Griffith reports that some of the bills in the state share package and the new tax package are not expected to pass; that the city's property tax is expected to rise next year. V: Shots of downtown Boston; of a meter maid giving a parking ticket. Footage of Young saying that the city will not go bankrupt; that the city will be forced to reduce the services it provides to residents; that the city will see a decline in its character and standard of living. Griffith reports that legislative hearings on the bills will be held on March 23; that votes will take place by May. V: Shots of reporters at Young's press conference. 0:07:23: Stock report: Dow Jones Industrials at 952.04; New York Stock Exchange volume was 19,520,000 shares; American Exchange volume was 3,110,000 shares. 0:07:48: Nelson reports that Brady Tyson (US Deputy Delegate to the UN Human Rights Commission) expressed regrets to the government of Chili for CIA involvement in the 1973 overthrow of the government of Salvador Allende; that the State Department said later that Tyson's remarks at the meeting of the UN Human Rights Commission were personal and not approved by the State Department. Nelson reports that Idi Amin (military ruler of Uganda) claims he is on a CIA death list; that Amin met with leaders at the Afro-Arab summit in Cairo; that Amin refused to allow a probe into human rights violations in Uganda. 0:08:37: Nelson reports that George Bush (former CIA Director) visited Cambridge to address the Middlesex Club of Republicans; that there is speculation about Bush running for president in 1980. Steve Curwood reports that Bush became CIA Director in 1976. V: Footage of Bush saying that he was often asked about the Allende affair as CIA Director; that he would not have apologized for the Allende affair. Bush says that he would support action to destabilize or overthrow certain governments, or "a Hitler." Curwood asks Bush about allegations concerning CIA use of the African Swine Fever Virus in Cuba to destabilize the Castro government. Bush responds that the allegations are false; that he never authorized the use of any chemical or biological warfare agents as CIA Director; that he will not comment on the use of those agents by other countries. Bush says that he does not believe that the CIA will be hurt by going along with rules and regulations not followed by other countries; that he worries about narrow guidelines concerning counterintelligence strategy. Curwood says that Bush does not deny the possibility of his running for the presidency in 1980. 0:11:47: Sports scores: Bruins beat Atlanta, 3 - 2. 0:12:00: Nelson reads headlines: Joseph Califano (HEW Secretary) announced a major reorganization of HEW; a law professor from the University of Chicago warned the House of Representatives not to let Carter reorganize the federal government. 0:12:19: Nelson reports that Carter will present a comprehensive energy program on April 20; that Carter's planners are soliciting input from citizens; that conservation and "personal sacrifice" will be at the heart of the program. Mike Kolowich reports that the US is the largest consumer of energy in the world; that the US wastes some of its most valuable energy resources. V: Shots of steam rising from smokestacks, chimneys and sewers. Kolowich reports that Thomas Widmer (vice president, Thermo Electron) advocates a more efficient use of energy; that Thermo Electron is a thermodynamic research and manufacturing firm in Waltham. V: Footage of Widmer saying that there is no energy crisis; that the US is not using energy effectively; that there is a "surplus of entropy." Kolowich reports that Widmer endorses conservation in a report he prepared for the Carter administration; that Widmer believes conservation is not enough. V: Shots of Widmer's report. Footage of Widmer saying that he does not endorse conservation through curtailment of energy use; that he endorses conservation through technology; that energy must be used more efficiently. Kolowich reports that "technological fixes" have been used in West Germany; that West Germany uses energy more efficiently than the US. V: Shots of smokestacks; of cars and trucks on highway; of factories; of houses with chimneys. Kolowich reports that US cars and trucks are too large; that the US steel making industry is not using energy as efficiently as it could; that new technology could help US industries use energy more efficiently. Kolowich reports that the federal government would need to provide incentives for industry to become more energy efficient; that the government would need to impose controls on the consumer level. V: Audio of Widmer saying that there should be mandatory controls on the efficiency of air conditioners, lighting, new home construction and commercial buildings; that it is possible to set mandatory efficiency standards for industry. Footage of Widmer saying that energy taxes could be imposed on industry; that tax credits could be given to energy efficient industries. Kolowich reports that Widmer thinks this policy would result in economic growth without an increase in energy use; that Widmer's ideas were once considered revolutionary; that Carter's energy program may rely on some of Widmer's ideas. 0:16:56: Weather report and area ski conditions. 0:17:45: Nelson reports that Henry Gonzales (Democratic Representative from Texas) resigned as chairman of the House Assassinations Committee; that Lewis Stokes (Democratic Representative from Ohio) will be the new chairman. Nelson reports that Governor Michael Dukakis is looking for quick legislative approval of his proposed Industrial Development Authority, an agency to encourage business development in Massachusetts. Nelson reports that state officials will not comment on a listening device found in the telephone of Owen Clarke (State Tax Commissioner); that tax records were recently seized in an investigation of his agency. Nelson reports that Leo Nolan is appealing his conviction for the murder of a Haverhill grocer fifty years ago. 0:18:30: Nelson introduces commentary by Christopher Lydon on the first few months of the Carter presidency. Lydon says that critics have doubts about Carter's performance; that critics doubt his understanding of foreign policy issues. Lydon says that Carter knows what he is doing when he speaks out on human rights; that Carter's outspoken support of human rights can lead to inconsistencies in foreign policy; that Carter wrote a letter in support of Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov, but told the Soviet ambassador that human rights should not get in the way of relations between the two countries. Lydon points out other contradictions in the intersection of human rights and foreign policy in the Carter administration. Lydon says that Carter speaks out on human rights to remind Americans of the importance of human liberties and the values represented by the US. 0:20:38: Nelson closes the show with a joke. Credits roll. 0:21:19: Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Steve Nevas reports that Secretary of State Cyrus Vance says that there is a chance for Middle East peace talks during the second half of the year; that Arab states might allow Israel to keep some of the West Bank; that the Arab states will insist on the return of the Gaza Strip, the Golan Heights and the Sinai Desert; that Vance asked Congress not to try to enlist other nations in measures against the Arab boycott of Israel. 0:21:57: Sports scores: Golden State beats the Celtics, 101 - 94; the Bruins beat Detroit, 8 - 3. 0:22:20: Nevas reports that Carter spoke to employees at the Pentagon today; that Carter says he does not want to revive the draft, but will not rule it out completely. 0:22:36: Nevas introduces Christopher Lydon's interview with Richard Reeves (political writer). Lydon asks Reeves about Carter's public persona. Reeves says that Carter's ruthlessness and toughness is not visible in his public image; that Carter had to be calculating and tough to get to the top; that Carter has picked up campaign tips and tricks from political novels. Lydon comments on Reeves' theory that Carter's early success in the campaign was played up in the media; that the media ignored later setbacks because they had already created an image of him as a winning candidate. Reeves says that Carter planned a good campaign; that the media chose to give extensive coverage to the primary election; that the media created a momentum around Carter and it worked in his favor. Lydon asks Reeves' opinion on Carter and his success. Reeves says that Carter's public image will be destroyed if he gets caught lying. 0:25:55: Weather report and ski conditions. 0:26:55: Nevas reports that the US has taken control of the fishing grounds along the east coast. He gives a brief history of fishing in the western Atlantic. Nevas reports that the US now controls nearly 1/5 of the world's marine fish resources; that the US took control of east coast fishing grounds in the name of conservation; that taking control of the fishing grounds should not become a jingoistic exercise. Nevas closes the show. Credits roll. 0:28:23: Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Christopher Lydon comments on Carter's energy policy. He speculates on Carter's relations with the natural gas industry. Nevas closes the show. Credits roll. 0:29:50: Footage from the end credits of another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Fundraising promotion featuring David Ives (President, WGBH) singing a fundraising song accompanied by guitar.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1977
Description: Mayor Kevin White honors seven distinguished Bostonians at a gala reception at the Parkman House. Women's rights advocate Florence Luscombe, community activist Melnea Cass, former senator and governor Leverett Saltonstall, former senator and ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, theater critic Elliot Norton, historian Walter Muir Whitehill, entrepreneur Sidney Rabb (of Stop & Shop). Personal narratives of the honorees with archival stills of their lives.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/06/1977
Description: Boston Celtics vs. Houston Rockets. K.C. Jones and Satch Sanders coach these teams. Game play shot from courtside. Players include: Dave Cowens, Sidney Wicks, JoJo White, Kevin Stacom, Curtis Rowe, John Havlicek, Cedric Maxwell, Saunders, Bing, Boswell. Buzzing from commentary can be heard in the background. Crowd cheers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/11/1978
Description: Mayor Kevin White, with Speaker Tip O'Neill and Lt. Governor Thomas O'Neill, announces federal discretionary grant for The Boston Plan Project Yes to be used for urban renewal and youth employment. Approximately 10,000 jobs have been created for young adults ages 16-19 living in an entitlement area who are enrolled in school. Jobs are part-time during the school year and full-time during the summer. Jobs are available in both the public and private sectors.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/12/1978
Description: Mass of spectators gathered at Prudential Center finish line of Boston Marathon. David Ives watches. Cloudy, cold day. Airplanes fly around trailing message banners. First wheelchair finisher George Murray rolls in with police escort. Press photographers truck. Bill Rodgers wins a close race in 2:10:15. Randy Thomas and Kevin Ryan cross line. Rodgers climbs up to platform for Gov. Michael Dukakis, Mayor Kevin White and Will Cloney to congratulate him with laurel wreath and medal. He is then surrounded by press horde and police. More top runners cross. Bob Hall places third in wheelchair division. Other runners cross the finish line.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1978
Description: Mayor Kevin White press conference on city budget. Topics discussed include employment, crime prevention, the elderly, taxes.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/02/1978
Description: Some sound dropout at the beginning of the tape. Pam Bullard's 1978 review of school desegregation in Boston. The review focuses on the effects of desegregation on South Boston High School and the Joseph Lee School. Bullard reports that attendance is low at South Boston High School, but the school atmosphere and programs have improved. Bullard reports that the Joseph Lee School is a good example of a successfully integrated elementary school. The story includes footage of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and interviews with Ruth Batson (African American community activist), Jerome Wynegar (headmaster, South Boston High School), David Finnegan (Boston School Committee), Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School). Bullard also interviews teachers and students at the Lee School and South Boston High School. The report ends with footage of students at the Lee School performing in a play of "The Wizard of Oz."
1:00:02: Visual: Shot of Boston skyline. Footage of Mayor Kevin White on September 9, 1974 calling on Boston residents to come together to make busing work. Footage of buses pulling up in front of South Boston High School on the first day of school in 1974. A crowd of antibusing protesters has gathered outside of the high school. The crowd jeers at the buses. Shots of the Boston Public Gardens. Footage of Ruth Batson (African American community activist) describing Boston as a "racist, violent city." She says that the violence stemming from school desegregation has spilled over into the streets and housing projects. Footage of police marching in formation on Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown. A large crowd is gathered outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project. Pam Bullard reports that violence and racial hatred erupted in Boston when a federal court ordered the desegregation of schools in 1974. She notes that President Gerald Ford was forced to put the 82nd Airborne division on alert, in preparation for duty on the streets of Boston. Bullard reports that the toughest neighborhoods are quiet three years later; that African American and white children attend school together without incident. V: Shots of a lone police officer outside of South Boston High School; of African American and white children entering an elementary school. 1:01:39: Bullard reports that the effects of school desegregation will not be known for years; that some inconclusive studies have been made. V: Footage of African American and white students in an integrated elementary school classroom. Bullard notes that resistance to school desegregation in Boston has been overcome. V: Shots of a busy street in South Boston; of a young white boy outside of a church; of two elderly white residents sitting on a stoop in South Boston; of racist graffiti on a wall. Bullard reports that the fiercest opposition to court-ordered desegregation in the north took place in South Boston; that the opposition has calmed down since 1974. Bullard notes that school buses transporting students to and from South Boston High School are still accompanied by a police escort; that they are greeted by four police officers on duty at the high school. V: Shots of a police cruiser leading school buses up G Street to South Boston High School; of police officers outside South Boston High School; of African American students exiting the buses at South Boston High School. Bullard notes that metal detectors were installed at South Boston High School after the stabbing of a student three years ago. V: Footage of a student passing through a metal detector; of the halls of South Boston High School. Bullard reports that racial hatred and fear at South Boston High School have given way to a lingering uneasiness. V: Footage of a white teacher in a classroom in South Boston High School. He teaches to a classroom of eight African American and white students. Bullard notes that attendance is low at South Boston High School; that classes can be as small as four students. V: Shots of teachers teaching to very small classes at the high school. A teacher is heard saying that the official enrollment at South Boston High School is 600 students; that she estimates the enrollment to be 300 students. Shots of an African American teacher helping an African American female student at a desk; of students studying in classrooms; of teachers and students in sparsely populated classrooms. Bullard notes that the school was put under receivership by the federal court in 1975; that Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) was brought in by the court; that Wynegar and his staff have instituted many alternative programs at the school. V: Footage of Wynegar saying that there are fewer problems at South Boston High School because students are happy with the school programs. Shots of white and African American students studying in classrooms at the high school. Footage of a white female teacher saying that erratic attendance is the biggest problem at South Boston High School; that she finds herself repeating lessons for the benefit of students who were absent. Footage of Wynegar saying that South Boston High School ranks eleventh out of eighteen schools in attendance; that he though the school would rank last in attendance; that students appreciate the way they are treated at the school. Shots of students in classrooms; in the automotive shop. Footage of the white female teachers saying that alternative programs are attractive to students; that students also need to learn basic skills. 1:05:04: Bullard notes that there are divisions between those who support traditional classroom learning and those who support alternative programs. V: Shots of students in classrooms; of students in the lunchroom. Footage of an African American female student saying that South Boston High School is much better this year than in previous years; that students are getting along and are more focused on their classes. A white male student says that more students are attending school now. Another white male student says that students are getting along better. The white female teacher says that the atmosphere at the school has improved. Shots of the corridors in South Boston High School; of white and African American students playing basketball. Bullard says that there are no answers as to why the atmosphere at South Boston has improved; that innovative programs, low attendance and a wearing down of resistance to integration are all factors. V: Footage of white and African American students exiting South Boston High School; of school buses traveling down G Street away from the school. Footage of David Finnegan (Boston School Committee) saying that the community needs to realize that there are good solid programs in the Boston Public School System; that desegregation has added to the quality education provided by the schools; that the atmosphere in the schools is good, but can be improved. Bullard notes that even critics have conceded that the court-ordered magnet school programs have been good for the school system. V: Footage of African American and white students at a student art show; of the students' art projects. Bullard notes that there are opportunities in art and drama programs at the magnet schools; that there are opportunities for student internships; that there have been no racial problems at the magnet schools. Bullard reports that desegregation has been costly in financial and human terms; that the cost of the first year of desegregation was $20 million; that the second year of desegregation was $30 million; that police overtime ran up the cost of school desegregation. Bullard notes that costs have stabilized at $12 million over the past two years; that there is less of a need for police officers in the schools now. Bullard reports that Boston taxpayers have had to pay for expenses not covered by state and federal funds; that Boston taxpayers pay the highest property taxes in the nation. Bullard notes that the school budget remains at $175 million per year; that the city has lost 28,000 white students since 1972; that one expert says that 16,000 students were lost to desegregation. V: Shots of an empty classroom; of a teacher's attendance book; of a students in a sparsely populated classroom. Bullard adds that many students transferred to parochial schools, private academies and suburban schools; that many high school students dropped out. Bullard notes that the Lonegan family of South Boston refused to bus their children; that their daughter stayed out of school for a year. V: Footage of the Lonegan family. Mrs. Lonegan sits at a table in her home with her daughter Michelle and her son. Mrs. Lonegan says that she found a job making beds at a nursing home in order to pay her children's tuition at a private school. 1:09:07: Bullard reports that Christina Termini (student) lives in West Roxbury, but attends the Lee School in Dorchester. V: Footage of Termini leaving her home and walking to a bus stop. She boards the bus. Footage shot from the inside of the bus as it travels through the city. The white children on the bus sing songs. Audio of Termini's mother saying that the Lee School is ideal for Christina; that she has great confidence in the education her daughter receives at the Lee School. Shots of African American children walking to the Lee School from the Franklin Field Housing Project. Shots of a white student in French class at the Lee School; of integrated classrooms at the Lee School. Footage of a teacher saying that the children of the Lee School get along well; that racial differences are not important in the classroom. Bullard reports that attendance at the Lee School is low; that 600 students attend the school; that the school has 1,000 seats available; that white attendance could be higher. Bullard notes that the atmosphere at the school is excellent. V: Footage of the students performing "The Wizard of Oz" on stage. A young white female student says that she likes the facilities at the Lee School; that she has met a lot of friends. Footage of the white female teacher saying that she likes teaching at the Lee School. Footage of Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School) saying that many other urban school systems are experiencing the same problems as Boston; that desegregation has brought stability and strong programs to the system. Footage of Lee School students at their "Wizard of Oz" play. They sing "Ding, dong, the wicked witch is dead." Bullard reports that the Boston Public School System has made impressive progress since school desegregation began in 1974; that the system is no longer deliberately segregated and rife with political patronage. Bullard notes that parental involvement and stronger political leadership has improved the schools. V: Footage of Batson saying that the city has been forced to confront its racial problems through school desegregation. Shots of African American and white students entering an elementary school. Bullard reports that the federal court still runs the Boston Public School System. V: Footage of Batson saying that the process of desegregation has been valuable to some students. Shot of a Lee School student performing a song in the "Wizard of Oz" play. The audio of the student singing accompanies shots of a police officer in front of South Boston High School; of African American students entering South Boston High School; of Wynegar in front of South Boston High School; of a student passing through a metal detector; of African American and white students playing basketball; of an empty classroom; of the Lonegan family; of young African American and white students; of police cruisers leaving the school yard of South Boston High School. Children at the Lee School clap for the student performer on stage.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/01/1978
Description: Interview with Mayor Kevin White on the Boston mayoral race. He discusses resolving problems within neighborhoods/communities, departments, politics.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/22/1978
Description: Ride along Blue Hill Avenue. Decrepit, boarded up and abandoned storefronts. Many defunct businesses. Vacant lot. Zion Apostolic and Immanuel Pentecostal Churches. Warren Street intersection. Bridge Free Medical Van. Houses on Supple Road. Prince Hall Masonic Lodge. Sign for the Mayor's Office of Housing. Street sweeping vehicle. Mayor Kevin White walks with Julian Bond through neighborhood with press entourage. White answers questions about his candidacy and housing policy decisions as mayor especially involving the Boston Housing Authority, and says urban revitalization will come to reality within 3-5 years but need more federal $$. White and Bond meet local business owners and community members.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/20/1979
Description: Joseph Timilty campaigns in East Boston in mayoral race. B-roll of support signs for Kevin White and Joseph Timilty. An East Boston man denounces Kevin White for mayor. Timilty greets supporters at Maverick Square outside T station. Talks about his campaign strategy. Says main issues for the East Boston neighborhood are water and sewer costs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/19/1979