Description: The Boston School Committee holds a meeting in the School Committee chambers. Members of the School Committee discuss school business. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) reports on the need for school repairs; Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reports on staffing issues. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) interviews Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) about a proposed school choice plan. Kelly says that many parents support a school choice plan because the current system allows little flexibility. Kelly says that the school choice plan must be considered carefully to prevent a return to segregated schools. Stevens interviews O'Bryant about the proposed school choice plan. O'Bryant says that the plan promotes greater access to schools across the city; that the current system is archaic and inflexible. Stevens interviews Barbara Gray (parent) about the proposed school choice plan. Gray says that parents should be allowed to choose a school with programs suited to the needs of their children. Gray says that the schools need to be improved; that the Boston Public Schools are not truly integrated because there are few white students. Stevens has extended conversations with interviewees while cutaways are shot. Takes of Stevens doing standup about supporters of the school choice plan working on an official proposal for the end of the month. The audio quality on this tape is uneven.
1:00:12: Visual: A Boston School Committee meeting is held in the chambers of the Boston School Committee. School committee members Jean McGuire, John O'Bryant, Jean Sullivan McKeigue, Kevin McCluskey, and Rita Walsh Tomasini are seated at the front of the room. Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) sits at the front with the members of the School Committee. Community members and the press are seated in the audience. O'Bryant talks about the need for $40 million to make school repairs. He says that the mayor, the Boston City Council, and the community must be made aware of the money needed for repairs. Shots of the various committee members. McKeigue agrees that school repairs are needed. A vote is taken on approving a draft of a letter to the mayor and the Boston City Council. O'Bryant thanks Spillane for his report. O'Bryant asks Spillane a question about staffing. Spillane says that more staff is needed before instituting a certain program. Audio is muffled. Shots of Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter); of members of the audience; of the stenographer; of the committee; of the audience. The committee members discuss school business. Audio remains muffled. Shot of the committee members from the perspective of the audience. 1:05:10: Visual: Spillane talks about setting objectives for the school Social Studies programs. Shots of the committee members; of the audience. Audio is muffled. The committee members take a vote. Committee members discuss school contract issues. Shot of Stevens; of Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) speaking to another audience member; of audience members. 1:08:15: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Kelly. Stevens asks Kelly about a "freedom of choice" proposal supported by some African American parents. Kelly says that she has not yet seen the proposal; that many African American and white parents support a "freedom of choice" plan because the geocode system allows little flexibility; that parents are more interested in good education than racial statistics. Kelly says that a control mechanism must be put in place to prevent a return to segregated schools; that the plan must be given careful thought. Kelly says that the choice of educational programs is more important than the choice of school location. Stevens asks Kelly if busing is "almost dead." Kelly says that busing is no longer the only remedy for Boston schools; that busing can serve as a tool to further the goals of desegregation and educational quality. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Kelly. Stevens and Kelly speak informally. 1:12:36: V: Stevens sets up an interview with O'Bryant. Stevens asks for O'Bryant's opinion of the "freedom of choice" proposal. O'Bryant says that parents are trying to reform the rigid geocode system; that students have been denied access to schools because of the geocode system. O'Bryant mentions students who have been denied access to the Trotter School. O'Bryant says that the parents are asking for more accessibility to the schools; that the "freedom of choice" proposal has been made into a bigger issue than it should be. O'Bryant says that the geocode system assigns students to schools based upon their residence; that the geocode system is archaic and inflexible; that the geocode system must be addressed in the consent decrees put forth by the court; that leaving the geocode system in place would have "disastrous" consequences. Stevens asks O'Bryant about NAACP intervention in the court case, and NAACP opposition to the "freedom of choice" plan. O'Bryant says that there is a lack of communication between the NAACP and supporters of the plan; that supporters of the plan want greater access to the schools. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. O'Bryant says that schools in Boston are already segregated because white parents refuse to send their children to most schools located in African American communities; that African American parents want greater access to quality schools all over the city. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and O'Bryant. O'Bryant says again that the "freedom of choice" plan does not represent a return to segregated schools. 1:16:13: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Barbara Gray (parent), who supports the "freedom of choice" plan. Gray says that the supporters of the plan want greater access to all of the schools; that supporters of the plan want an end to the rigid geocode system. Gray explains that the geocode system assigns children to schools according to address and race. Gray says that all of Boston schools need to have high standards; that the each of the schools should have different programs designed to suit specific needs; that students should be able to choose a school whose programs suit their needs. Gray says that education needs to be improved so that all of the schools are equally competitive and able to provide a good education. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. Gray says that she does not want to go back to segregated schools; that true integration does not exist in Boston because there are not enough white students in the school system; that white students might return to the system if the schools are reformed. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Gray. Gray says that parents want more control over the education of their children. 1:19:59: V: Stevens records the closing segment of the story from outside of the headquarters of the Boston School Committee. She reports that the supporters of the "freedom of choice" plan are working on an official proposal for the end of the month; that the Massachusetts State Board of Education will propose an end to court intervention in the Boston School System. Stevens does two more takes of the closing segment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1982
Description: Final stretch and finish line of the Boston Marathon. Wheelchair competitors crossing finish line. Blimps in above the crowd. Announcer makes comments on how closer the leading runners are to each other. Runners cross finish line. Alberto Salazar and Dick Beardsley finish very close together, running the marathon faster than anyone had in the history of the race. Kevin White awards winner Alberto Salazar with medal and laurel wreath. Third place runner, John Lodwick, crosses finish line. Fourth place runner, Bill Rodgers, crosses finish line. Other runner cross finish line. Charlotte Teske, winner of the women's race of the Boston Marathon, awarded medal and laurel wreath. Women's second place runner, Jacqueline Gareau, crosses finish line. Glenda Manzi does several takes of reporter standup. Interview with Charlotte Teske.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1982
Description: Byron Rushing (State Representative) addresses a rent control demonstration outside Boston City Hall. He encourages tenants to fight for their rights, urges voters not to support anti-rent control candidates, and advocates a citywide referendum on the issue. Pat Burns (Catholic Connection) speaks about Sojourner House, a shelter for homeless families and the Catholic Connection's support for rent. Boston City Councilors Ray Flynn, Michael McCormack, Christopher Iannella and Maura Hennigan confer in the chambers of the Boston City Council. Boston City Councilors Frederick Langone, Albert "Dapper" O'Neil, Terence McDermott, Bruce Bolling , and Joseph Tierney are also present. The gallery of the chambers is filled with observers, many wearing pro-rent control buttons. Ianella calls the meeting to order and the clerk reads appropriation orders and requests submitted by Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) for the approval of the council. The council discusses and votes on orders from the mayor concerning the Public Works Department and the Public Facilities Commission. The clerk reads a request from the mayor concerning the financing of a bond for the Winthrop Printing Company. The Council conducts business on the chamber floor with Langone discussing a proposed law concerning the cleanliness of dumpsters in the city and about building affordable housing instead of high-priced condominiums. Sounds cuts out near the end and then comes back in.
1:00:04: Visual: Byron Rushing (State Representative) speaks into a microphone. He says that working class and poor people need to fight for their rights as tenants. The crowd claps. Rushing says that voters must vote against politicians who do not support rent control; that rent control must be brought to the ballot as a citywide referendum. The crowd claps. Shots of the crowd outside of City Hall. A white woman addresses the crowd, saying that it is not a good idea to classify tenants as elderly, disabled or low-income; that those classes of tenants will have difficulty finding apartments. Shots of two older men in the crowd. One of them is wearing a button which reads, "Rent Control: Continue and Strengthen it. Ban condominium conversion evictions." Shot of the button. Pat Burns (Catholic Connection) addresses the crowd. Burns talks about Sojourner House, which is a shelter for homeless families. Burns says that the Catholic Connection supports rent control in order to stop the increasing number of homeless families. Shot of a man holding a rent control sign reading, "No rent control plus no condo ban equals no housing." Shots of the crowd listening to Burns. Several crowd members are holding pro-rent control signs. 1:02:23: V: The white woman addresses the crowd as they move into the City Hall building. Shots of the crowd as they enter City Hall. One woman holds up a sign reading, "Landlords get the money. Tenants get the shaft." 1:03:33: V: Boston City Councilors Ray Flynn, Michael McCormack, Christopher Ianella and Maura Hennigan confer in the chambers of the Boston City Council. Frederick Langone (Boston City Council) confers with a woman on the floor of the chambers. Langone sits down in his chair, with his cigar in his mouth. The gallery of the chambers is filled with observers. Many observers wear pro-rent control buttons. Albert "Dapper" O'Neil (Boston City Council) joins the group of councilors. 1:05:51: V: Hennigan sits in her chair on the floor of the chambers. She flips through some papers on the table in front of her. Flynn sits down in his seat. Langone lights his cigar. Terence McDermott (Boston City Council) is sitting in his seat on the floor of the chamber. Albert "Dapper" O'Neil (Boston City Council) sits in his seat. The clerk calls the roll of city council members. Ianella brings the meeting to order. 1:08:28: V: The clerk reads appropriation orders and requests submitted by Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) for the approval of the council. The council discusses and votes on orders from the mayor concerning the Public Works Department and the Public Facilities Commission. Shots of McDermott; of McCormack; of Langone; of audience members in the Council gallery. The clerk calls the council roll for a vote on the order concerning the Public Facilities Commission. Shot of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council). The clerk reads a request from the mayor concerning the financing of a bond for the Winthrop Printing Company. 1:12:03: V: Shots of audience members in the gallery; long shot of the floor of the Council Chamber from the gallery. Audio is muffled. Langone discusses a proposed law concerning the cleanliness of dumpsters in the city. More shots of audience members. 1:15:45: V: Councilors conduct business on the floor of the Chamber. Langone talks about housing. Shots of Christy George (WGBH reporter); of Bolling, Flynn and Hennigan; of Bolling; of Flynn; of Joseph Tierney (Boston City Council). The Council continues to conduct business. Langone talks about building affordable housing instead of high-priced condominiums.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/15/1982
Description: Four stories from 1983. 1) Urban development in Boston is an issue in the mayoral race. Helicopter aerial of skyline from harbor. Tilt up Prudential and Hancock towers. Pan of Copley Place. Anthony Tappe of Boston Society of Architects comments on deterioration of Victorian Boston because of the scale of new development, making for a less desirable and livable city. Controversy over Mayor Kevin White's intense involvement in urban planning process is discussed by mayoral candidates at a BSA forum on the future of city planning. David Finnegan, Dennis Kearney, Lawrence DiCara, Robert Kiley, Ray Flynn, Mel King. Robert Ryan, BRA director. Marriott Long Wharf Hotel. 2) The dichotomy between preserving rent control/affordable housing and encouraging free market business development through condo conversions in Boston. Struggle of 87-year-old Hester Hurlbutt of 250 Commonwealth Avenue to stay in her apartment. Mel King comments on housing displacement. Ray Flynn favors ban on evictions. David Finnegan disagrees, worried about economic climate. Scenes of Back Bay, Copley Place, Boston Public Library. Sign for luxury condominium for sale. Mayoral candidates Dennis Kearney and Lawrence DiCara campaigning. 3) Latino voters will have an impact on Boston's mayoral race. Alex Rodriguez, Jorge Hernandez, Yohel Camayd-Freixas endorse Mel King. Jose Masso, Gov. Dukakis' Hispanic liaison, says Latinos will split ideologically according to their respective nationalities. 4) Joseph Nelson and Mabel "Matty" Matheson talk about the tradition of the Fenway Victory Gardens. Other plot tenders revel in the therapeutic value and beauty of gardening. Views of flower beds and vegetables.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 1983
Description: Press conference statement followed by Q&A. Discussion of 2 courts decisions. One that requires half of construction in Boston goes to Boston residents is not unconstitutional, with additional mention of minorities and women. The other decision is an injunction on the police plan. Kevin White and Robert Ryan (Head of BRA), answers questions, along with other White administration officials.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/28/1983
Description: In this story on linkage, Christy George gives history of Boston development boom and affordable housing decline. She describes proposed linkage between the two in the form of taxes on new development, the proceeds of which would go toward affordable housing. Kevin White press conference. Interview with Bruce Bolling on his proposed linkage law. Interview with housing advocate Robert McKay, who is also on the committee reviewing the linkage law. There is a discussion of how exactly linkage will work. Kevin White, Ray Flynn, Larry DiCara, and Dave Finnegan all weigh in on linkage as a mayoral campaign issue.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/16/1983
Description: Gail Harris interviews Mel King (candidate for mayor). King discusses his reasons for running for mayor and talks about the issues he considers most important to the city's residents. King answers questions about how he would deal with the city's leaders, the city's power brokers and "the Vault." King talks about the importance of education and training. Harris and King discuss the changes in King's image and manner of dress. King notes the diversity within the African American community; he dismisses the idea of any one candidate receiving 100% of the vote in the African American community. King gives his opinion of Mel Miller (publisher of the The Bay State Banner), who is opposed to King's candidacy. King says that there is no Boston neighborhood in which he feels uncomfortable. King and Harris discuss how to keep racial issues out of the campaign; Harris and King discuss his boycott of an earlier campaign debate because it excluded some candidates. King talks about his goals for the city as mayor. After the interview, while shooting cutaways, King tells Harris about his book, Chain of Change. King talks about his hobbies and about the importance of organizing and empowering people. King gives his opinion of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston).
0:59:57: Visual: Gail Harris interviews Mel King (candidate for mayor). Harris asks King why he is running for mayor. King says that he has lived his whole life in Boston; that he understands the importance of public service; that it is important for the city to take care of its neediest citizens. King says that affordable housing, employment, health care, and education are important issues to many in the city. King says that some residents of Boston are living in unacceptable conditions; that families are living in overcrowded apartments; that some residents are isolated from the mainstream; that homelessness is a problem in the city. Harris asks King how he would deal with the city's leaders and power brokers and "The Vault." King says that he has worked with a cross-section of people in the city over the course of his career; that he worked with the Chamber of Commerce and the Chandler School to develop a training and placement program for women. King says that people are resources; that training can provide skilled workers for big corporations. King says that training is important; that school failure leads to street crime and juvenile delinquency; that lack of education and unemployment are at the root of most social problems. 1:06:20: V: Harris comments that King has changed his look; that he no longer wears a dashiki. King says that he has not changed his position on the issues; that his clothing is not relevant to his ideas. Harris asks if it is possible to get 100% of the vote in the African American community. She notes that the African American community is very diverse. King agrees that the African American community is very diverse. He says that he resents those who say that he needs to get 100% of the African American vote; that no white candidate is assumed to need 100% of the white vote. King says that a racism leads voters to look at the color of his skin instead of his record and his position on the issues. Harris asks what King thinks of Mel Miller (publisher of the The Bay State Banner), who says that the African American community should offer their support to a strong candidate who can support them after becoming mayor. King says that no one pays a lot of attention to Miller; that Miller is opposed to the ERA. King says that African Americans need to fight for what they want and support one another; that Miller has a negative view of white people; that Miller's influence is destructive to the African American community. Harris asks King if there are any parts of the city in which he feels uncomfortable. King says that there is no part of the city in which he is uncomfortable; that he wants to bring the city together; that he wants to reach out to people who disagree with him on the issues. King says that people must be brought together around common issues like employment and improvements to the schools and the city. Harris asks how King would prevent racial issues from entering the campaign, especially if he found himself in a runoff with David Finnegan (candidate for mayor) or Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor). King says that his previous campaigns for public office have always focused on issues; that the diversity of his campaign workers has earned his campaign the nickname of "the rainbow campaign." 1:14:21: V: Harris asks King if he regrets boycotting an earlier campaign debate because two other candidates were not invited to participate. King says that he has no regrets; that candidates must practice the "politics of inclusion." King notes that it is hypocritical for a candidate to promote equal access for all, and then to take part in a public forum which excludes the voices of some. Harris asks him about what he could accomplish as mayor. King says that he could affect real change in the city; that he would concentrate on reducing crime and fighting drugs; that he would appoint a new police commissioner to work with the community and to root out problems in the police force. King says that Joseph Jordan (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) learned about the problems on Sonoma Street by watching television; that the city needs a commissioner who can mobilize the force to fight crime; that Jordan allowed the mayor to use the police force as a political tool in the debates on Proposition 2 1/2 and the Tregor Bill. King says that he would investigate corruption through an audit of the city's programs; that the government needs to make sure that good services are being provided. King notes that the city government must spend the citizen's tax dollars wisely. King says that new resources must be spent for improvements at Boston City Hospital; that some employees at the hospital qualify for public assistance because their salaries are so low. Harris asks King if he would campaign for mayor even if he knew there was no chance of victory. King says that he has many forums through which to promote his ideas; that he has published a book recently. King says that he would not run if he didn't think he could win; that he would not want to waste his own time and valuable time and money of others; that he thinks he can win and effect real change in the city. 1:20:55: V: Harris thanks King and closes the interview. The crew takes cutaway shots of Harris and King. King tells Harris about his book, Chain of Change. King talks about his hobbies. King talks about the importance of organizing and empowering people. He talks about organizing tenants through the Symphony Tenants Organizing Project. Harris tells King about her impressions of Boston politics. She mentions Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) and Clarence Jones (former Deputy Mayor of Boston). King says that he did not support White in 1975 or 1979; that White has taken the African American vote for granted; that White has not delivered services to the African American community.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/19/1983
Description: Interview with Andrew Young, Mayor of Atlanta at the Parker House. Young talks about his efforts to facilitate international trade between Atlanta businesses and third-world nations. He says that urban mayors can help local businesses by leading trade delegations and encouraging local businesses to get involved in emerging markets. Young criticizes the federal government's reliance on the military in conducting foreign policy. He says that the US must act with intelligence and rely on diplomacy to solve world problems. He talks about US involvement in Vietnam, Lebanon, and El Salvador. Young and Christy George discuss African Americans in politics. Young does not believe that a candidate should not represent one single constituency. Young says that more African Americans need to be elected as senators, mayors and governors before an African American is elected as president. George reasks questions for cutaways. Young attends a cocktail party at the Parker House. Other guests include Bruce Bolling, Boston City Councilor, and Hubie Jones, Dean of the School of Social Work at Boston University.
1:00:04: Visual: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) is interviewed by Christy George in the Parker House. George asks about urban mayors taking on international roles. George notes that Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) is interested in Young's work in Atlanta with third-world nations; that Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) calls Boston a "world-class city." Young says that most governments help businesses; that the federal government has done little to help businesses. Young says that mayors can help local businesses. Young talks about leading trade delegations of Atlanta businessmen to other parts of the world. Young says that businessmen can gain access to government officials through the mayor. Young says that he took businesspeople, educators and a YMCA soccer team on a trip to Jamaica and Trinidad. Young says that the businesspeople did $150 million of business during a one-week trade mission. Young says that business people were allowed to see the decision-makers in foreign governments. Young says that white mayors can do the same thing. Young says that the mayors of Seattle and Indianapolis have done the same thing. Young says that there are large concentrations of Dutch and Japanese businesses in Georgia; that he is trying to build on that. George notes that African-American mayors are now dealing with third-world countries. Young says that the emerging markets are in the third world. Young says that he will visit Nigeria next week. Young says that Nigeria is buying products from Atlanta; that Nigeria is developing at a rapid rate. Young notes that Japanese and German businesses have been doing business with the third world for a long time. Young says that US businesses never needed to do business abroad until 1975. George notes that Young had been talking about doing business with the third world when he worked for Jimmy Carter (former US President). George remarks that the Democratic Party has not advocated more trade with the third world. Young says that Ronald Reagan (US President) sees everything in terms of an East-West conflict. Young says that the US needs to look beyond the East-West conflict. Young talks about US involvement in Egypt and Panama in the 1970s. Young says that diplomatic treaties can undercut communist influence. Young says that military solutions seem popular, easy and "macho." Young says that military solutions have seldom succeeded for the US or for the Soviet Union. 1:05:15: V: George asks what the Democratic Party should be doing to prepare for the 1984 elections. Young says that the Democratic Party must approach world problems with "reason and sanity." Young talks about how the US was drawn into the Vietnam War. Young says that US ships are present off the coasts of Central America and Lebanon; that the US could easily become trapped in a military situation in one of these regions. Young says that there is no military solution in Lebanon; that the US has no business there. Young says that there is no military solution in El Salvador. Young says that the US needs to show its strength through intelligence; that the US should not show its strength through destructiveness. Young says that the Democratic Party must offer clear a alternative to Reagan. Young says that the US is living on the brink of war; that this policy is insane. George asks how the Democratic Party should deal with political unrest and revolutions in the third world. Young says that the US needs to understand the impulses behind revolutions in third world country. Young says that Harry Truman (former US President) probably did not know that Ho Chi Min (former Vietnamese leader) worked as a chef at the Parker House while he was a student in Boston. Young talks about the influence of American ideas of freedom on Ho Chi Min in the 1940s. Young says that third world leaders should not be discounted as Marxists. Jump cut in videotape. George asks if African Americans need an African American candidate for president in 1984 in order to gain political influence. Young says that he disagrees; that politicians should not represent only one segment of the population. Young says that the present Democratic candidates have strong records on civil rights and minority issues. Young says that African Americans need to be involved in the campaign of a winning candidate. Young says that candidates never live up to promises made at the convention. George asks if it is time for an African American presidential candidate. Young says that there need to be more African American mayors, governors and senators before there is an African American president. George closes the interview. 1:09:57: V: The crew takes cutaway shots of George. 1:14:40: V: Footage of a cocktail reception at the Parker House. Attendees eat, drink, and socialize. Attendees include Hubie Jones (Dean of the School of Social Work, Boston University), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), Carol Bolling (wife of Bruce Bolling), Young, and others. Shot of Young socializing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/22/1983
Description: Christopher Lydon introduces a report on "the five Bostons," which includes analysis of voter turnout and voting habits in the various neighborhoods of Boston. The neighborhoods include Italian Boston, black Boston, liberal Boston, Irish East and Irish West. The report analyzes voter support for mayoral candidates in each neighborhood and includes interviews with voters in each neighborhood. Lydon notes that Italian Boston includes East Boston and the North End. Lydon talks about the remote location of East Boston. His report includes interviews with Anna De Fronzo (East Boston community activist) and George DiLorenzo (former State Representative). Lydon reports that Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) has a lot of support in East Boston; that Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) is a favorite in the neighborhood. Lydon explains that liberal Boston is a mix of wealthy residents, students, blue-collar families and young professionals; that voter turnout is often low. Lydon interviews John Winthrop Sears (former candidate for governor of Massachusetts), Thomas Vallely (State Representative) and Veronica Smith (Allston community activist). Lydon notes that the support of voters in liberal Boston is split among a several candidates. Lydon reports on a renewal of political activity in black Boston, and notes that there is a high percentage of newly registered voters in the African American neighborhoods. The report includes interviews with Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Kay Gibbs (South End political activist). Stith and Gibbs talk about the candidacy of Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) as well as opposition to King's candidacy, led by Mel Miller (publisher, The Bay State Banner). Lydon reports that Irish East has the highest voter turnout in the city. He interviews Thomas Driscoll (South Boston political consultant) and Paul White (State Representative) for the report. Lydon notes that the support of voters in Irish East is split between Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston) and David Finnegan (candidate for mayor of Boston). Lydon reports that Irish West is a residential neighborhood with many middle-class residents. The report includes interviews with Richard Sinnott (Hyde Park Tribune), Joseph Timilty (State Senator), and Maura Hennigan (Boston City Council). Lydon notes that the support of Irish West voters is split between Flynn and Finnegan; that King may receive the votes of Latino residents. Lydon reports that White is a West Roxbury native, but never had the full support of neighborhood residents.
1:00:09: The logos of The Ten O'Clock News underwriters New England Telephone and Shawmut Brokerage Services are displayed. Opening credits for The Ten O'Clock News. Christopher Lydon introduces a report on "The Five Bostons." 1:00:58: Anna De Fronzo (East Boston community activist) compares East Boston's remote location to that of Siberia. Visual: Shot of a map of Boston with East Boston highlighted in yellow. Lydon reports that the Italian population of Boston lives in the North End and East Boston. V: Shots of three older men sitting near a wall; of a yard with a Virgin Mary statue in East Boston; of the Boston skyline viewed from a street in East Boston. Lydon reports that "Italian" Boston has 8% of the city's registered voters; that "Italian" Boston has good voting habits and could account for 10% of the votes in the mayoral race. Lydon reports that there is no political issue to rally the residents of East Boston this year; that controversy over school desegregation and airport expansion have died down. V: Shots of older women in East Boston; of Logan airport as viewed from East Boston; of streets in East Boston. Lydon reports that Italian American candidates have always found favor in East Boston; that Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) is a resident of Eagle Hill and has a lot of support in East Boston. V: Shot of Kearney campaign sign. Footage of East Boston residents voicing their support for Kearney. Lydon reports that there are residents of ethnicities other than Italian; that many East Boston residents will vote for one of their own. Lydon reports that Eloise Linger (Socialist candidate for mayor of Boston) has more supporters in East Boston than Lawrence DiCara (candidate for mayor of Boston); that Linger lives in East Boston while DiCara lives in Dorchester. V: Footage of De Fronzo saying that Italian Americans are apt to vote for candidates of other nationalities. Lydon stands on an East Boston street with the Boston skyline visible. He reports that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) gained support in East Boston when he supported action by the anti-airport movement; that East Boston received attention from the White administration in return for their support of White. V: Traveling shot of an East Boston street. Footage of George DiLorenzo (Former State Representative from East Boston) talking about the great number of jobs given to East Boston residents by White. DiLorenzo says that White appointed three city commissioners from East Boston; that other mayors did not give key positions to East Bostonians. DiLorenzo says that the White political organization in East Boston was the strongest political organization that he has ever seen; that John "Dee Dee" Coviello (East Boston political organizer) is responsible for uniting the community behind White. Footage of De Fronzo saying that she does not think any of the candidates will garner the kind of support that White had in East Boston; that some of the candidates will ignore East Boston if elected mayor. 1:05:57: V: Footage of Lydon interviewing John Winthrop Sears (former Republican candidate for governor of Massachusetts). Sears says that his part of Boston is progressive and not afraid of change. Shot of a map of Boston with "liberal" Boston highlighted in blue. Shots of a street in the Back Bay; of Kenmore Square; of an upscale apartment building. Lydon says that "liberal" Boston stretches from Chinatown through Beacon Hill and the Back Bay to Kenmore Square and Cleveland Circle. Lydon reports that "liberal" Boston is multi-ethnic; with many single residents including students and the elderly. Lydon stands on a leafy street lined with brownstones. He reports that "liberal" Boston is made up of white precincts which do not vote according to racial lines; that "liberal" Boston never supported Louise Day Hicks (former Boston City Councilwoman). Lydon reports that "liberal" Boston usually has a large population with a poor voter turnout. V: Footage of Lydon interviewing residents about their voting habits. Most residents do not vote or have not yet registered to vote. Footage of Sears talking about residents of "liberal" Boston who vote in other states. Sears says that the inheritance laws in Massachusetts have driven wealthy voters to declare a primary residence elsewhere. Footage of Thomas Vallely (State Representative from the Back Bay) saying that the Back Bay community is made up of wealthy residents; that his constituents voted for Proposition 2 1/2; that the Back Bay has a vibrant gay community; that his constituents seem more concerned with national politics than local politics. Shot of a resident at DeLuca's Market in Beacon Hill. Lydon stands on the corner of Commonwealth and Harvard Avenues in Allston. Lydon reports that there are blue-collar families, students and the elderly in Allston; that young professionals are moving into the area. Lydon reports that Thomas Gallagher (State Representative) came to Allston as an out-of-state student; that he beat a local politician for the office of state representative. V: Footage of Veronica Smith (Allston community activist) saying that Gallagher is popular with the students and young professionals. Smith says that she cannot predict which mayoral candidate is the most popular in Allston. Footage of Sears saying that DiCara is popular among many voters now that Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston) has dropped out of the race. Footage of Vallely analyzing his constituents response to the candidacies of Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston), Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston), and David Finnegan (candidate for mayor of Boston). Lydon reports that "liberal" Boston will lose a mayor when White leaves office. V: Footage of White walking his dog in the Boston Public Gardens. Footage of Vallely saying that White was a "friend" to the community. Footage of Sears saying that White's presence in the neighborhood will be missed; that White is tired after a long political career. 1:12:46: V: Footage of Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) talking about a renewal in African American political activity in Boston and around the nation. Shot of a map of Boston with "black" Boston colored in pink. Lydon reports that "black" Boston comprises 20% of the city; that "black" Boston has spread from Mission Hill to Mattapan and Dorchester. V: Shots of a train on elevated tracks along Washington Street; of White campaigning in African American neighborhoods. Lydon says that "black" Boston had been a cornerstone of White's coalition during his four mayoral campaigns. Lydon reports from a street corner in "black" Boston. A train passes by on the elevated tracks behind him. Lydon reports that "black" Boston usually has a low voter turnout; that "black" Boston has high percentage of newly registered voters this year. Lydon says that the percentage of African American registered voters is now slightly higher than the percentage of white registered voters. V: Footage of African American residents voicing their support for Mel King. Shots of African American residents getting on an MBTA bus; of a Bay State Banner editorial endorsing David Finnegan. Lydon reports that Bruce Wall (African American minister) and Mel Miller (publisher, The Bay State Banner) have not supported King's candidacy. V: Footage of Stith talking about Miller's endorsement of Finnegan. Stith says that most voters are supporting King. Footage of Kay Gibbs (South End political activist) saying that African American voters believe in King's candidacy; that African American mayors have been elected in city's across the nation; that Miller has been discredited because he is a Finnegan supporter who has never supported an African American candidate for any city office. Lydon reports that King is not well rooted in African American church life; that many African Americans were turned off by his wardrobe. V: Shots of King; of a religious service in an African American church; of African American churchgoers outside of a church. Footage of Gibbs saying that middle-class African Americans had reservations about King at first; that all African American voters are now confident in King's ability to represent the African American community. Gibbs says that King does not think like a middle-class candidate; that he sees himself as a "champion of the underdog." Lydon reports that the African American community has undergone a change in its thinking about political candidates. V: Footage of Stith saying that increased voter turnout and political participation establishes the African American community as a political entity; that the African American community benefits from King's campaign even if he loses. 1:19:01: V: Footage of "Irish East" voters voicing their support for Flynn and Finnegan. Lydon reports that "Irish East" includes Charlestown, South Boston and parts of Dorchester. V: Shots of streets in South Boston and Dorchester. Lydon reports that "Irish East" has the highest voter turnout in the city; that "Irish East" has 1/8th of the city's population and 1/5th of the city's registered voters; that it will account for 1/4th of the voter turnout in the mayoral primary. V: Traveling shot of the Boston skyline. Lydon reports from a street in South Boston. Boston Harbor is visible behind him. Lydon reviews the voting patterns of "Irish East" in recent presidential and gubernatorial elections. Lydon says that "Irish East" often votes for losing candidates like George McGovern (presidential candidate in 1972), Gerald Ford (presidential candidate in 1976) and Ed King (Massachusetts gubernatorial candidate in 1982). Lydon reports that "Irish East" has voted for unsuccessful mayoral candidates like Joe Powers, Louise Day Hicks and Joseph Timilty. Lydon reports that "Irish East" has two of their own as candidates for mayor this year. V: Footage of "Irish East" voters voicing support for Flynn and Finnegan. Footage of Thomas Driscoll (South Boston political consultant) saying that there might be confusion between the "old" Flynn and the "new" Flynn; that Flynn is now a progressive candidate; that the "old" Flynn was an anti-busing, anti-abortion candidate. Footage of Paul White (State Representative from Dorchester) saying that Finnegan has a lot of support in the Dorchester community. White talks about Finnegan's connections to St. Ann's parish. Shots of South Boston. Footage of Driscoll talking about strong neighborhood connections in South Boston. Driscoll predicts that Flynn will get 60% - 75% of the vote in South Boston. Lydon reports from the corner of Adams Street and Gallivan Boulevard in Dorchester. Lydon says that "Irish East" has been out of political favor for a long time; that they now have two strong mayoral candidates. V: Footage of White talking about how Dorchester would benefit from having a Dorchester native as mayor of Boston. White says that Dorchester would claim Finnegan as a native son, even though he now lives in West Roxbury. 1:25:08: V: Footage of Richard Sinnott (Hyde Park Tribune) talking about the neighborhoods of Roslindale and West Roxbury. Shot of a map of Boston with "Irish West" colored in green. Lydon reports that the "Irish West" neighborhoods include the"city suburbs" west of the orange line; that a majority of the residents are Irish American; that there are also Polish, Greek and Lebanese residents. V: Shot of Casa Beirut restaurant. Traveling shot of a residential street in "Irish West." Lydon reports that most residents own their own homes in "Irish West"; that Brighton is included in "Irish West." Lydon notes that "Irish West" traditionally has a very high voter turnout. V: Shots of residents boarding an MBTA bus; of residents walking on a street. Lydon reports that many "Irish West" voters are civil servants, police officers, and teachers; that politics are important to these voters. V: Footage of Sinnott saying that the community benefits from good city services; that "Irish West" voters are not concerned with "linkage"; that displacement and housing for the elderly are important issues in the community. Footage of Joseph Timilty (State Senator) saying that property values declined during the busing crisis; that property values have risen again. Lydon reports that the Forest Hills area has some Latino voters and "new gentry"; that some of these voters may vote for Mel King. V: Shots of urban streets; of Latino children playing on a sidewalk. Lydon reports from a street in front of a church in "Irish West." Lydon notes that most "Irish West" voters support either Ray Flynn or David Finnegan; that Finnegan seems to be the favorite in "Irish West." Lydon notes that Finnegan moved from Dorchester to West Roxbury to raise his family; that Finnegan has connections in "Irish East" and "Irish West." Lydon notes that most of Boston's Irish mayors have come from "Irish West." Lydon mentions former Boston mayors White, John Collins, Maurice Tobin and James Michael Curley. V: Footage of Maura Hennigan (Boston City Council) saying that Curley's legacy lives on in Jamaica Plain. Footage of "Irish West" voters voicing support for Finnegan and Flynn. A few voters voice support for Mel King and Dennis Kearney. Footage of Sinnott saying that White never had the full support of the "Irish West" community; that White was a good mayor. Lydon reports from a park. A football team practices on a field behind him. Lydon says that White was a West Roxbury native; that White always had to fight for votes in "Irish West"; that residents have mixed feelings about White. V: Footage of Timilty saying that White will be remembered fondly with the passage of time. Footage of Sinnott saying that White was "a working mayor as well as a dancing mayor." 1:30:29: V: Footage of city residents voicing support for the candidate of their choice. Closing credits roll. The logos of The Ten O'Clock News underwriters New England Telephone ,and Shawmut Brokerage Services are displayed.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/10/1983
Description: Barney Frank (US Representative) and Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) shake hands in front of the Massachusetts State House. Frank has endorsed King for mayor of Boston. Christy George interviews King in front of the State House. King talks about the current policies of the White administration and White's recent appointments to the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). King says that his administration would eliminate the BRA in order to consolidate city development under a community development office. King criticizes White for making mayoral appointments without regard for his successor. King adds that the current police commissioner must be forced to resign. King says that the Boston City Council should not approve White's new housing proposal. He adds that the City Council should wait until the next mayor is elected before making new policy.
1:00:05: Visual: Mel King stands in front of the State House with his supporters and talks to the media about his candidacy for mayor. He talks about the "politics of inclusion." A reporter asks King how he feels about being "Barney Frank's second choice." King says that Barney Frank (US Representative) makes good choices; that he is glad to be one of Frank's choices. Mel King thanks the media. He shakes hands with Frank. Frank and King speak to one another. 1:01:12: V: Christy George sets up an interview with King. George asks King if Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is consolidating power. She also asks him about mayoral appointments to city jobs. King says that political patronage is unfortunate; that White has not considered his appointments from the viewpoint of his successor. King says that the police commissioner must be asked to resign; that the new administration must work around the commissioner if he refuses to resign. George comments that the business community is wary of King and Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston). She asks if White is making appointments to the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) before the mayoral elections in order to satisfy the business community. King says that the new administration must take a balanced approach to development; that the needs of the whole city must be considered. King says that his administration would consolidate the development functions of the city; that his administration would work to eliminate the BRA board as it is now; that a community development office would oversee development in the neighborhoods and in the downtown area. George notes that White's appointments to the BRA are not unusual for a mayor leaving office. King says that these candidates will be "holdovers"; that "holdover" appointments should only be allowed for a minimum period of time; that these appointments undermine public confidence in government. George asks King about White's plans to create a Neighborhood Housing Trust. King says that he hopes that the Boston City Council will not approve the program until a new mayor has been elected. King says that he will lobby the council not to approve the program. George ends the interview.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/21/1983