Description: Fritz Wetherbee reports that Annie Johnson, a Boston resident, will receive the Living Legacy Award in Washington DC. Johnson grew up in Boston and organized domestic workers through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston in the 1960s. She led the workers on a campaign for benefits. Interview with Johnson in her home. She talks about the importance of helping others. Johnson discusses her aunt, Eleanor Graves Chandler, who was an early community activist. Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen and visiting a senior citizen meal program at the Grace Baptist Church.
1:00:12: Visual: Footage of Annie Johnson (Living Legacy Award winner) saying that a person can be poor and "colored" and still help everybody. Fritz Wetherbee reports that Johnson is 83 years old; that Johnson will fly to Washington DC to receive her Living Legacy Award. V: Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen at home. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is preparing the food for Project Soup; that Project Soup is a senior citizen meal program at Grace Baptist Church. V: Footage of Johnson saying that people have called her for help when she is sick in bed; that she will get up to try to help them, before going back to bed to lie down. Wetherbee reports that Johnson grew up in Boston; that she has lived in the same house on Elmwood Street for 46 years; that she raised seven children in the house. V: Shots of Elmwood Street in Boston; of the exterior of Johnson's house on Elmwood Street. Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen. Wetherbee reports that Johnson organized domestic workers in the 1960s, through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston. Wetherbee notes that Johnson succeeded in winning minimum wage, worker's compensation, social security, and regular days off for the workers. Wetherbee adds that Johnson organized a job training program for the workers. V: Shot of the prepared chicken in a foil dish. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is the niece of Eleanor Graves Chandler. V: Shot of an African American woman serving chicken to elderly women at Project Soup. Footage of Johnson saying that Chandler was a politician; that Chandler believed that African American women should be active in politics and civic life. Johnson says that she can remember taking people to register to vote when she was younger. Johnson talks about another one of her relatives who was "an advocate for her race." Shot of Johnson leaving the Grace Baptist Church, carrying some flowers. Wetherbee reports that Martin Luther King Sr., Jesse Owens, Rosa Parks, A. Philip Randolph, and Roy Wilkins have all been awarded the Living Legacy Award; that Johnson will receive the award this evening. V: Footage of Johnson saying that many other racial groups have followed the lead of African Americans in their struggle for civil rights.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/20/1987
Description: Jan von Mehren reports on Henry Hampton's address to students at Boston University. Von Mehren notes that Hampton talked about the importance of campus activism and civil rights. Von Mehren's report includes footage of Hampton speaking to the student audience. Hampton encourage students to make demands on the university administration. Pearl Shelton (community activist) addresses the students from the audience. She encourages them to become involved in the struggle for change in society. Von Mehren's report also includes footage of Rosa Moreno (Boston University law student) and Derek Davis (Boston University law student) talking about the lack of activism on college campuses. Von Mehren discusses the role of campus activism in the civil rights movement in the 1960s. Von Mehren's report includes footage from Eyes on the Prize of Diane Nash (civil rights activist). This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: K.C. Jones of the Boston Celtics reacts to racist remarks made by Jimmy "the Greek" Snyder on national television Reactions to comments by Jimmy "the Greek"
1:00:06: Visual: Black and white footage of the Civil Rights Movement from Eyes on the Prize. African American students face off with white police officers during the civil rights movement. African American student demonstrators are marching on a street. Shot of an FBI poster seeking information on the murder of three civil rights activists. Shots of students being escorted into police vehicles; of police using fire hoses on civil rights activists in Birmingham, Alabama. Shots of civil rights activists at city hall in Nashville, Tennessee; of Diane Nash (civil rights activist) standing with Ben West (Mayor of Nashville). Footage of Nash saying that she asked West if he believed that discrimination was wrong. Footage of West saying that he told Nash that discrimination was morally wrong. Shot of Nash applauding as she faces West. Jan von Mehren talks about how students were on the front lines of the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Von Mehren notes that some civil rights activists lost their lives; that some were jailed. Von Mehren talks about the participation of college student Diane Nash in the civil rights movement. Von Mehren says that today's college students have only vague memories of the civil rights movement. Von Mehren reports that Henry Hampton (civil rights activist and filmmaker) addressed a group of high school and college students today at Boston University. V: Shots of students listening to Hampton speak; of Hampton addressing the students. Footage of a white female student asking Hampton how Boston University can increase the enrollment of minority students. Hampton says that students need to be persistent in making demands on the administration. Von Mehren stands at the back of the auditorium where Hampton is speaking. Von Mehren says that the civil rights activists from the 1960s are trying to convince the younger generation to become active. V: Footage of Pearl Shelton (community activist) standing in the audience. She asks how many students are members of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) or the Urban League. Shelton says that students need to give something back to society. Footage of Shelton being interviewed by von Mehren. Shelton says that Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) would be disappointed in the lack of activity in the current movement for civil rights. Footage of Rosa Moreno (Boston University law student) saying that there is apathy among students today; that some students do not know how to become involved; that civil rights organizations need to distribute information to students. Footage of Derek Davis (Boston University law student) saying that students have not mobilized behind one cause or political candidate; that many students are disillusioned or skeptical; that some students are interested in fighting for change. Shots of Hampton addressing the crowd; of students in the crowd listening to Hampton. Von Mehren says that today's students have not united behind one cause; that many are trying to make a difference. V: Footage of Hampton saying that today's students need to dream like King did. Shot of the audience applauding.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/18/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that state and local officials have come through with funding for a multi-million dollar program to revitalize Grove Hall, which is Roxbury's business district. The area has experienced hard times since the late 1960s. Press conference to announce the revitalization program. City Councilor Charles Yancey and Mayor Ray Flynn talk about the program to revitalize the district. Jones walks through district while conducting an interview with Walter Little, the Executive Director of the Neighborhood Development Association of Grove Hall. Little talks about the revitalization program and the development of the area. Little notes that there is a high concentration of subsidized housing in the area. Little talks about the history of the area, noting that the district once had a large Jewish population. Jones notes that the revitalization program will benefit current and future residents of the area. Following the edited is additional footage from the press conference and Jones' interview with Little while walking through the Grove Hall District.
1:00:23: Visual: Footage of Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) at a ceremony to mark the revitalization of Grove Hall. Yancey says that the revitalized Grove Hall will develop into the best community in the city of Boston. Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) at the ceremony. Flynn says that the concerns of the Grove Hall community will no longer be ignored. Shots of the neighborhood; of signs for the Grove Hall Cafe and the Boston Legal Assistance Project. Marcus Jones reports that state and local officials have finally come through with a multi-million dollar program aimed at revitalizing Roxbury's business district. Jones notes that the area has experienced hard times ever since the riots which followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader) in 1968. V: Shot of Jones in the Grove Hall district with Walter Little (Executive Director, Neighborhood Development Association of Grove Hall). Jones asks about a boarded up building on the street. Shot of a woman crossing the Street. Footage of Little standing with Jones. Little says that three tenants of one building have now become owners of the properties on the block. Little says that local residents must have the opportunity to participate in the ownership and development of a property. Shot of the streets in the area. Jones remarks that Little has lived in this area for forty years. V: Shot of a "No Trespassing" sign on a boarded-up building; of another boarded-up building. Footage of Little saying that the area has the largest concentration of subsidized housing of any area in the city; that there are 2800 subsidized units within the Grove Hall boundaries. Little says that economic balance is important to the survival of a commercial district. Little says that the small shops currently in the Grove Hall area are not enough to support a thriving commercial district. Little notes that many of the current businesses are fairly new to the area. Jones reports that Little remembers when there was a large Jewish population in the area; that Siegel's cafeteria was a popular restaurant in those days. V: Shot of Jones and Little walking on in the Grove Hall District, near a liquor store which once was Siegel's Cafeteria. Footage of Little saying that Siegel's Cafeteria closed in the early 1970s; that they were one of the last businesses to leave the area. Shot of the front of the liquor store; of two women walking on the street. Shot of a boarded-up apartment building. Jones reports that the revitalization plan aims to benefit the current and future residents of the Grove Hall area. V: Footage of Little saying that the money is available for the project; that buildings in the area will no longer be boarded up after the revitalization. Shot of Jones and Little on the street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/20/1988
Description: Christy George reports that Jesse Jackson spoke about leadership in a speech at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. George reports that Jackson is very active in this non-election year. George's report includes footage of Jackson walking a picket line with striking Eastern Airline employees and footage of Jackson visiting an Armenian earthquake zone. George talks about Jackson's activities since the 1988 election. George's report also features footage from Jackson's speech at Harvard. Jackson talks about voter cynicism in the 1988 election and the qualities of a good leader. Jackson says that the US must invest in itself in order to flourish. He explains a metaphorical term: "honeybee sense." George's report also includes footage from Jackson's 1988 presidential campaign. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Lee Atwater visits Massachusetts for a Republican Party fundraiser
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) as he enters an auditorium at the John F. Kennedy School of Goverment at Harvard University. The audience applauds for Jackson. Shot of a man in the crowd. Footage of Jackson addressing the audience. Jackson jokes about his speech being televised on C-Span. Jackson waves to his mother. Christy George reports that Jackson talked about the scarcity of good leaders in American politics during his speech at the Kennedy School of Government. V: Footage of Jackson delivering his speech. Jackson says that public cynicism won more voters than Bush did in the 1988 campaign. Jackson notes that 50% of the eligible voters did not vote; that 70% of voters expressed a desire for a different choice. Jackson says that Bush's campaign won while the country lost. Footage of Jackson at a campaign rally in New Hampshire on February 16, 1988. The crowd chants, "Win, Jesse, Win." George notes that Jackson travels the country regularly in non-election years. V: Shots of Jackson doing a television interview; of Jackson picketing with striking Eastern Airline employees. George reports that Jackson has walked with striking Eastern Airline employees across the nation; that Jackson turned a tour of an Armenian earthquake zone into a Soviet-American people's summit. V: Shot of a Soviet news anchor reading the news; of Jackson kissing a baby in Armenia. Footage of Jackson looking out of a window while riding on a bus in Armenia. Jackson speaks to the media, saying that human beings must care for one another. Footage of Jackson at a 1988 campaign rally. George calls Jackson a "perpetual candidate" and a "peripatetic preacher." V: Footage of Jackson speaking at the Kennedy School. Jackson says that he is a "liberal" who fights for change. Jackson says that pollsters and pundits are looking for a manufactured candidate. Jackson says that great leaders do not follow opinion polls; that great leaders mold public opinion. Jackson says that John F. Kennedy (former US President) was not following opinion polls when he reached out to Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Jackson says that Kennedy's actions were based on courage and principles. Jackson says that the US needs bold leadership to deal with the nation's "structural crisis." Jackson talks about "honeybee sense." Jackson says that honeybees know to drop pollen when they pick up nectar; that honeybees know the importance of keeping the flowers alive. Jackson says that the US needs to invest in itself in order to stay alive and flourish. The crowd rises to its feet and applauds for Jackson.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1989
Description: This tape features Marcus Jones' second report in a three-part series on the life of Jackie Robinson (baseball player) in honor of the fortieth anniversary of Robinson's entry into major league baseball. Jones reports on Robinson's career after baseball and his active participation in the civil rights movement. Jones notes that Robinson was the first African American to reach the level of vice-president in a major corporation when he was named to that post at the Chock Full O'Nuts company. Jones reviews Robinson's role in the civil rights movement and his political activity during the 1960 presidential elections. Jones reports that Robinson co-founded the Freedom National Bank in Harlem in 1963, which was the first bank in the US to be run by African Americans. Jones talks about Robinson's disappointment when white teammates from professional baseball refused to join him for the March on Washington in 1963. Jones' report includes footage from interviews with Rachel Robinson (wife of Jackie Robinson), Ambassador Franklin Williams (friend of Jackie Robinson), Mal Goode (journalist), and Clem Labine (former Brooklyn Dodger). Jones' report also features footage of the civil rights movements and footage of Robinson in the 1960s. Jones' report includes footage from the film Jackie Robinson: An American Journey. Tape 2 of 3
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of Jackie Robinson walking off of a baseball field. Text on screen reads, "Jackie Robinson's American Dream." Black and white shot of an older Robinson waving goodbye; of the exterior of Ebbets Field; of a newspaper headline reading, "Giants get Robinson." Shot of a black and white photo of Robinson in a suit. Marcus Jones reports that Jackie Robinson left baseball in 1957; that Robinson chose to retire instead of be traded to the New York Giants. Jones reports that Robinson signed on as vice-president of personnel for Chock full o'Nuts company; that Robinson was the first African American to reach the level of vice-president in a major corporation. V: Black and white footage of Robinson in a baseball uniform; of Robinson in a business suit; of a sign for "Chock full o'Nuts." Black and white footage of Robinson with his employees; of Robinson meeting with a group of people. Jones reports that Robinson played an active role in the civil rights movement. V: Footage of Rachel Robinson (Jackie Robinson's wife) saying that Robinson wanted to be a part of the civil rights movement. Black and white footage of African American students integrating white schools; of African American picketers outside of a Woolworth lunch counter; of an African American man confronting a police officer; of Martin Luther King (civil rights leader); of an African American man being pushed by white men; of fire hoses being used on African American demonstrators; of African American picketers with protest signs. Footage of Ambassador Franklin Williams (friend of Robinson) saying that Robinson identified with the NAACP; that Robinson was an active chairman of the Freedom Fund Campaign. Jones reports that Robinson advocated equal opportunities for African Americans in all areas; that Robinson's stature drew attention to the cause. V: Footage from Jackie Robinson: An American Journey. Footage shows Robinson campaigning for civil rights. Robinson rides in a convertible through an African American neighborhood. Footage of Williams saying that Robinson drew great crowds; that women would pay to have him kiss them on the cheek. Footage of a Nelson Rockefeller presidential campaign rally in 1960. Robinson is visible in the crowd. Jones reports that Robinson supported Nelson Rockefeller (presidential candidate) in 1960; that Robinson campaigned for the Republican nominee Richard Nixon (1960 Republican presidential nominee) after Rockefeller lost the nomination. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Nixon and Robinson. Footage of Williams saying that Robinson believed that African Americans would be strengthened if they were represented by both of the major parties. Footage of a campaign debate in 1960 between Nixon and John F. Kennedy (1960 Democratic presidential nominee). Footage of Williams saying that Robinson had great respect for Nixon at the beginning of the 1960 presidential campaign; that Robinson eventually became disillusioned with the Republican Party. Shot of a black and white photo of Nixon and Robinson. Black and white footage of Kennedy's inaugural speech. Jones reports that Robinson continued to fight for equality for African Americans; that Robinson pushed for Mal Goode (journalist) to be hired as the first African American TV news correspondent. V: Shots of black and white photos of Robinson; of Robinson and Goode. Footage of Goode reflecting on the sacrifices made by the previous generation of African Americans. Jones reports that Robinson co-founded Freedom National Bank in Harlem in 1963; that the bank was the first bank to be run by African Americans. V: Shots of Freedom National Bank in Harlem. Black and white footage of Robinson talking about the importance of Freedom National Bank. Jones stands in front of Freedom National Bank. Jones reports that Robinson worked to free the African American community from the constraints of racism. V: Footage of Williams talking about the idea of a bank run by African Americans, in which whites could participate. Black and white footage of Robinson talking about the importance of registering African Americans to vote. Black and white footage of African Americans marching in the South in 1963; of whites standing behind a Confederate flag; of two white men waving a small Confederate flag. Jones reports that Robinson spent a lot of time in the South in 1963. V: Black and white footage of Robinson and King; of Robinson addressing a crowd about the need for equal rights. Shots of a black and white photo of King. Black and white shot of Robinson picking up a telephone. Black and white aerial shot of the March on Washington in 1963. Jones reports that Robinson was disappointed when his white Dodger teammates refused to join him for the March on Washington in 1963. V: Footage of Clem Labine (former Brooklyn Dodger) saying that he regrets not joining Robinson for the March on Washington. Black and white shot of Robinson addressing a crowd. Jones reports that Robinson started a construction company in 1970; that the company was dedicated to building low-income housing. V: Shots of Robinson at a construction site; of Robinson looking at architectural plans; of Robinson throwing out a baseball at a ballgame. Jones reports that Robinson died in October of 1972. Jones stands outside of Ebbets Field Apartments. Jones says that Robinson's ideals still live on.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/05/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson has released position papers detailing his stance on domestic issues. Vaillancourt reviews Jackson's positions on the economy, trade, employment, social programs, defense spending, and taxes. Interview with labor union leader Domenic Bozzotto and Harvard professor Roger Porter about Jackson's positions on the issues. Bozzotto defends Jackson's platform while Porter criticizes it. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson would support his social programs through cuts in defense spending and increased taxes on wealthy Americans. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson's position as the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination challenges other candidates to defend their positions on the issues. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: James Farmer speaks at a ceremony in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr.
1:00:07: Visual: C-Span footage of Jesse Jackson (US Democratic Presidential Candidate) addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. The audience cheers for Jackson. Footage of Jackson quoting poetry to a reporter. On-screen visuals list details about Jackson's position on the economy. On-screen text reads, "Invest pensions in America." Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has a stack of position papers on economic issues. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson advocates the investment of pension funds in federally-guaranteed securities; that Jackson would use the capital to fund public housing, roads, and other public works projects; that the investment of 10% of US pensions would yield $60 billion for projects. V: Shot of Jackson talking about his positions at a forum; of Jackson addressing supporters at a campaign rally. Footage of Domenic Bozzotto (President, Hotel Workers Union) that he likes Jackson' s idea of putting pension money to work for social good; that Jackson's plan also gives a fair return on the investment. Footage of Roger Porter (Harvard University) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Porter says that Jackson's plan calls for government guarantees on pension investments; that the government could end up paying the difference on a poor investment. Vaillancourt says that trade issues are another important issue in the election. V: On-screen visuals list details about Jackson's position on trade issues. On-screen text reads, "Adopt 'corporate code of conduct'." Footage of Jackson saying that General Electric is the number one exporter from Taiwan. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson believes that cheap overseas labor is the main cause of the US trade deficit. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson would abolish tax incentives for US companies abroad; that Jackson would insist that America's trading partners pay the same wages as those earned by US workers. V: Shots of Jackson marching with union workers. Footage of Bozzotto saying that "slave wages" paid to workers abroad will undercut organized labor in the US. Footage of Porter saying that the US cannot impose these policies on its trading partners. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson is a populist on employment issues. V: On-screen visuals and text detail Jackson's position on employment. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson supports an increase in the minimum wage; that Jackson supports the passage of a worker bill of rights; that Jackson supports the plant closing law; that Jackson supports comparable pay for jobs of comparable worth. V: Footage of Jackson addressing supporters. On-screen visuals detail Jackson's positions on social programs. Vaillancourt talks about Jackson's position on social programs. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson supports universal day care and national health care; that Jackson would double spending on education; that Jackson would focus on combatting drugs. V: Footage of Porter saying that the government cannot support the increase in spending required by Jackson's social programs. Footage of Bozzotto saying that Jackson's programs would get the average person involved in the economy. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson believes that social programs can be paid for through cuts in the defense budget. V: On-screen visuals and text detail Jackson's position on defense issues. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson would eliminate the MX, the Midgetman and the Trident missiles; that Jackson would eliminate the F-15 fighter plane, the stealth bomber, and the Strategic Defense Initiative. V: Footage of Bozzotto saying that there is "fat" to be cut out of the defense budget. Footage of Porter saying that Jackson is misguided in thinking that cuts in the defense budget will yield great savings. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson is the only current Democratic candidate who has talked about taxes. V: Footage of Jackson saying that "Reaganomics" exempted some people from paying taxes. On-screen visuals and text detail Jackson's position on taxes. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson would increase the corporate tax rate to 46%; that Jackson would raise the tax rate to 38.5% for residents with incomes above $100,000; that Jackson would impose an oil import fee. V: Footage of Porter saying that Jackson's tax policy would rob the private sector of money for productive investment. Footage of Bozzotto saying that Jackson is not afraid of the American people; that Jackson is not afraid to advocate change. Vaillancourt reports that the media and the public are now paying attention to Jackson's positions on the issues; that Jackson's position as a frontrunner challenges other candidates to defend their own positions.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/04/1988