Description: Evening Compass newscast on the first day of Phase II desegregation of Boston Schools. Ed Baumeister reports optimism on the part of city and school officials about the opening of schools. Report includes footage of Arthur Gartland (Citywide Coordinating Council) at a press conference, talking about the successful opening of the schools. Paul deGive reports on the opening day at Charlestown High School, which was peaceful despite confrontations between police and Charlestown residents on Bunker Hill Street. DeGive reports that police motorcycles bore down with little warning on demonstrators sitting down in the middle of Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown; that a gang of youth overturned two cars in Charlestown and assaulted an African American student at Bunker Hill Community College. DeGive's report includes footage of Peggy King (Charlestown resident) and Gertrude Harris (Charlestown resident). King and Harris resent the police presence in Charlestown. Judy Stoia reports on reactions to busing and police presence in the Charlestown community. Her report includes footage from an interview with a white teenager who is boycotting school. Stoia notes that Charlestown residents are frustrated at the police presence in the neighborhood. Baumeister reports on the peaceful opening of school at South Boston High School. Donovan Moore reports on opening day at Madison Park High School. Moore's report includes footage of Tom Hennessey (Acting Headmaster, Madison Park High School), talking about the first day of school in a new building. Pam Bullard reports on the successful opening day at the Solomon Lewenberg School in Mattapan. Bullard's report includes footage of Jim Pardy (Assistant Principal, Lewenberg School) talking about the successful opening of the Lewenberg School. Gary Griffith reports from the Police Department Information Center on police activities throughout the city, including the arrest of 77 members of the Committee Against Racism (CAR). Griffith notes that the CAR members were demonstrating along a bus route in South Boston. Bullard reports on the first day of school at the Condon Elementary School in South Boston. Bullard's report includes footage of interviews with Marjorie O'Brien (South Boston parent) and Katherine Ellis (South Boston parent) concerning their views on busing and school desegregation. Greg Pilkington reports on opening day at the Dearborn School in Roxbury Greg Pilkington reports on the African American community's reaction to the beginning of Phase II school desegration, and on opening day at the Dearborn School. Pilkington reports that parents complained about the poor state of the facilities at the Dearborn School. Bullard reports that opening day at Hyde Park High School was peaceful. She notes that there were complaints from local residents about the heavy police presence. Bullard's report includes a still photo of racist graffiti on a mailbox in front of the school. Baumeister reports on transportation problems involving school buses. Baumeister's report includes footage of Baumeister questioning Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) about busing problems at a press conference.
0:59:53: Baumeister introduces the show. Opening credits roll. Baumeister reports that city and school officials are very optimistic about the opening day of schools in Boston under the first year of court-ordered desegregation; that 59.2% of the projected student population attended school. Baumeister notes that Arthur Gartland (Citywide Coordinating Council) was the most objective of the officials present at a press conference today. Visual: Footage of Gartland saying that the schools opened successfully despite disruptions in some neighborhoods; that police assured the safety of the students; that he expects school attendance numbers to grow. Gartland thanks the organizations involved in the successful opening of schools, including antibusing leaders who cautioned against violence. Baumeister reports that 80 people were arrested on school-related charges; that 77 members of the Committee Against Racism were arrested in South Boston. 1:02:13: Paul deGive reports on the opening day at Charlestown High School. DeGive reports that the school opened peacefully; that there was a heavy media presence. DeGive notes that there was a police sharpshooter on the roof of the school; that helicopters circled overhead; that US Marshals were present; that African American and white students arrived at the school without incident. DeGive reports that there were frequent confrontations between Charlestown residents and police on Bunker Hill Street; that 400 police were stationed in Charlestown today; that the police were busy dispersing crowds throughout the day. DeGive reports that eight police officers on motorcycles bore down with little warning on a group of 30 demonstrators sitting down on Bunker Hill Street; that the demonstrators took refuge in the Bunker Hill Housing Project; that police and media followed the demonstrators into the housing project where angry crowds had gathered. DeGive reports that Mrs. Frank VanGorder (local resident) verbally attacked Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) for using dangerous means to break up a nonviolent demonstration. DeGive reports that the crowds quieted down after noon; that African American students boarded buses and departed from the high school without incident; that police barred residents from getting closer than 100 yards to the school. DeGive reports that while police oversaw the boarding of buses at the school, a gang of 100 youth circled around the other side of Monument Square and overturned two cars as they descended Monument Street. DeGive reports that Frank Power (headmaster, Charlestown High School) said that the atmosphere was calm inside the high school. V: Footage of buses pulling up in front of Charlestown High School; of police officers stationing themselves on the street in front of the school; of African American students boarding the buses. Footage of Power saying that today "was a normal opening at Charlestown High School." Power denies any racial tension in the school, saying defensively, "How many times do you want me to say no?". DeGive reports that Charlestown residents resented the actions of police in dispersing crowds. V: Footage of deGive interviewing Peggy King (Charlestown resident) and Gertrude Harris (Charlestown resident). King says that she thinks the police are out to hurt Charlestown residents. Hayes says that she resents police entering the housing project and telling residents to vacate the streets on which they live. DeGive reports that Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) met with Captain MacDonald to discuss the community's grievances; that Kearney told MacDonald that the community resented the intrusion of helicopters, the Tactical Patrol Force and hundreds of other police officers into their community; that Kearney told MacDonald that demonstrators were given no warning before police motorcycles charged them . DeGive reports that Kearney said that the media acted irresponsibly; that there were too many media crews in Charlestown. 1:07:05: Judy Stoia reports on reactions to busing and police presence in the Charlestown community. Stoia reports that crowds gathered early along Bunker Hill Street; that there were many students who had boycotted school. V: Shots of crowds along Bunker Hill Street; of teenagers among the crowd. Footage of a white male teenager from Charlestown saying that he will boycott school all year because of busing. Stoia reports that Charlestown residents resented the heavy police presence in the neighborhood as much as busing. V: Shots of police officers lined up in formation on Bunker Hill Street; of police motorcycles lining the street; of police officers putting an arrestee into a police van. Stoia reports that many Charlestown residents were frustrated and bitter about the police presence; that many residents predicted that crowds will gather in protest as long as the police remain in the neighborhood. 1:08:33: Baumeister reports on the opening of school in South Boston. He reminds viewers of the massive resistance to busing in South Boston during the previous year. Baumeister reports that the opening day of school this year was peaceful; that US Marshals were stationed in front of the school; that police officers kept crowds away from the street in front of the school. V: Shots of police officers stationed in front of South Boston High School; of US Marshals standing in a small group in front of the school; of a white woman entering the school yard; of two police officers descending East 6th Street in front of the school. Baumeister reports that the police dispersed groups of more than three people; that they checked the credentials of all members of the press. V: Shot of a police officer checking identification of a member of the press. Baumeister reports that the buses arrived 30 minutes late; that students were kept on the buses for several minutes. V: Footage of buses pulling up in front of the school with a police motorcycle escort; of crowds further down the street, gathered behind a police line. Baumeister reports that a crowd had gathered on G Street; that they were kept away from the school by police. Baumeister reports that 78 of 432 African American students attended South Boston High School today; 216 of 785 white students attended school. Baumeister reports that the closing of school was very orderly; that the buses left South Boston with no problems. V: Shots of African American and white students entering the school. Footage of police officers lining G street; of school buses descending G Street with a police motorcycle escort; of police escort and buses traveling along Columbia Road. Baumeister reports that 77 members of the Committee Against Racism (CAR) were arrested for disorderly conduct; that they had intended to act as a welcoming committee for African American students at the high school. Baumeister reports that the arrestees were arraigned at South Boston District Court; that the chief justice of the court insisted that the arrestees be arraigned in South Boston to show that the court was functioning. Baumeister reports that he spoke to some African American students who said that the opening day at South Boston High School was better this year than last year. V: Footage of an African American female student being interviewed. 1:10:58: Baumeister reports that many believe that school integration would work better if schools were located at neutral sites. Baumeister introduces Donovan Moore's report on Madison Park High School, located at a neutral site in downtown Boston. Moore reports that students at Madison Park High School are housed in three temporary buildings; that school began slightly late; that navigation among the three buildings can prove confusing for students. Moore reports that the opening day went smoothly; that school monitors directed students to the registration tables. V: Footage of students at the entrance of Madison Park High School; of a white male student and an African American male student waiting to receive their schedules at a registration table. Moore reports that he talked to Tom Hennessey (Acting Headmaster, Madison Park High School) about the difficulties in opening a new school at a temporary site. V: Footage of Hennessy saying that most of the school's basic furniture has arrived; that students and most of the teachers have seats and desks; that the school is lacking some other equipment. Hennessey says that the school is fully staffed; that seven or eight teachers were notified of their assignment only a few days ago; that those teachers have not had time to orient themselves to the school's program. Moore reports that the projected enrollment at Madison Park High School is 1750 students; that 640 students of 1750 chose the school as a magnet school; that about 1100 were assigned to the school. Moore reports that 600 African American students and 200 white students registered for classes at the school a few weeks ago; that 675 students attended school today; that the racial breakdown of the school population today was 152 whites, 475 African Americans and 48 other minorities. V: Footage of Hennessey saying that Madison Park High School is a magnet school; that it is located in the heart of Boston's academic and commercial communities; that the school will concentrate on career opportunities for its students. Moore asks if there is potential for trouble among students being bused in from all areas of the city. Hennessey says that there may be potential for trouble; that careful preparation by staff and a strong academic program can help to minimize any trouble. 1:13:46: Baumeister introduces Pam Bullard's report on the Solomon Lewenberg School in Mattapan. Baumeister says that the previous year at the Lewenberg school was successful; that the school staff had worked hard to recruit white students for the school; that there were several hundred white students in attendance at the end of the year. Bullard reports that opening day at the Lewenberg School was a success; that the students seemed at ease; that the school faculty had been working very hard to prepare for opening day. V: Shots of the exterior of the Lewenberg School; of two African American students gathered in the school yard. Footage of white students exiting the school and boarding buses. Bullard reports that the faculty held open houses for incoming students over the summer; that over 500 students attended the school today; that over 200 white students attended the school. Bullard reports that the school had successfully recruited white students from Hyde Park during the previous school year; that white students are being bused in from West Roxbury this year; that school official are looking forward to a successful school year. V: Shots of white students boarding buses; of white students exiting the school; of a white female student hurrying toward a bus. Footage of Bullard interviewing Jim Pardy (Assistant Principal, Lewenberg School). Pardy stands in front of a group of African American students. Pardy says that attendance at the school is good; that the first day of school is usually a bit confusing; that they had more white students on opening day this year than they had on opening day last year. Pardy says that he expects white attendance to grow; that more white parents will send their children to school when they realize that the opening day was peaceful and orderly. Pardy says that the atmosphere within the school was friendly and calm; that many students were familiar with the school after attending open houses over the summer; that many students had already met their teachers over the summer. Pardy says that this year's white students seemed much more relaxed than the white students last year; that white students may be more familiar with the school because of their visits to the open houses held at the school. Pardy says that the faculty is probably "overjoyed" that the first day was a success; that he thinks white attendance will grow. 1:16:14: Baumeister introduces Gary Griffith's report from police headquarters. Gary Griffith reports from the Police Department Information Center on Berkeley Street. Griffith sits behind a desk, flanked by a map of Boston and an American flag. Griffith reports that the Police Department Information Center was supposed to have been the best source for information on police department activity and arrests. Griffith reports that members of the media have called the center "useless" and "a waste." Griffith reports that no police officials gave briefings from the center; that Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) has not appeared at the Police Department Information Center, although he did speak at the School Department Information Center. The camera pans the the empty room. A microphone from WCVB (Channel 5) is set up on the table beside Griffith. Police communications equipment is arranged neatly on a table. Empty chairs are arranged in front of Griffith's table. Griffith reports that there were 80 school-related arrests; that 77 members of the Committee Against Racism were arrested in South Boston; that no school children were injured; that there were no mass arrests of antibusing demonstrators in South Boston or Charlestown. Griffith reports that police presence was visible across the city today; that the police were stationed outside of the South Boston District Court building on East Broadway; that South Boston Police and the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) broke up a crowd gathered at the court for the arraignment of the CAR members; that 100 members of the Massachusetts State Police Department were called in to clear a two block area around the courthouse. Griffith reports that no rocks or bottles were thrown; that police dispersed the crowd. Griffith reports that residents of South Boston and Charlestown complained of their neighborhoods looking like an "armed camp." Griffith reports that the arraignments of the CAR members were completed by the end of the day; that most of the members were released on personal recognizance and escorted out of the area. 1:18:07: Baumeister comments that Griffith looks like a "lonely man" in the empty room at the Police Department Information Center. Baumeister introduces Bullard's report on the first year of school desegregation at South Boston's elementary schools. Bullard reports that the Condon Elementary School is located near the all-white D Street Housing Project in South Boston. V: Shot of a photograph of the Condon Elementary School as seen from the D Street Housing Project. Still photos of the Condon School on D Street. A few police officers are stationed in front of the school. Bullard reports that area residents fought for 12 years to get a new school. Bullard reports that most elementary school students in the area were assigned to the Condon School attended; that those students were present at school today. Bullard reports that area students assigned to elementary schools in Roxbury were kept home by parents. V: Shots of the D Street Housing Project and the Condon School. Bullard reports that most white students were escorted to the school by parents; that parents were apprehensive about the opening day, but were happy to have their children attend a neighborhood school. V: Footage of school buses approaching the Condon School on D Street, escorted by a police motorcycles and a cruiser. White parents and students watch the buses approach. Police officers are stationed on D Street. Bullard reports that buses carrying African American students were late; that only 44 out of 230 African American students attended the Condon School today. Bullard reports that the African American students seemed wary, but interested in the presence of the police and residents; that only Massachusetts State Police officers were present at the school; that officers were posted on the roof of the school. Bullard reports that there were no shouts or heckling from residents as the African American students entered the school. Bullard reports that school officials were concerned about the safety of the students arriving at the school. V: Footage of Massachusetts State Police Department officers directing the buses as they pull up in front of the school. Footage of young African American and white students entering the school. Footage of African American students exiting a bus and entering the school. White parents stand by quietly. Bullard reports that she spoke to two white mothers with children enrolled in the school. V: Shots of Mrs. Marjorie O'Brien (South Boston parent) and Mrs. Katherine Ellis (South Boston parent). Footage of O'Brien saying that she likes having her children at the Condon School because they are close to home. O'Brien says that she has one child assigned to the Dearborn School in Roxbury; that she doubts her child will be safe at the Dearborn. O'Brien says that there were reports of children being raped in Roxbury schools last year; that her son Walter will be tutored privately at home; that she will keep her son at home unless there is an end to forced busing. O'Brien says that she believes that children should attend schools in their own neighborhoods. O'Brien's son Walter stands quietly with his mother as she is interviewed by Bullard. O'Brien says that she feels safe having her other children at the Condon School; that she feels more confident now that she has witnessed the peaceful opening of the school. Bullard asks O'Brien is she is bothered by the number of African American children attending the Condon School. O'Brien responds that she is "not really" upset by the number of African American students; that she does not mind African American students coming to South Boston, but she does not like the idea of students from South Boston being sent to Roxbury. Footage of Ellis saying that she does not like the heavy police presence in South Boston; that the police presence creates bad feelings among residents. Ellis says that residents are angry about school desegregation; that she does not know what residents will do about the busing situation. Ellis says that she is does not think there will be trouble at the Condon School; that "no one would hurt babies, black or white." 1:22:07: Baumeister reports that this year marks the beginning of Phase II school desegregation; that Phase II desegregation effects schools city-wide. Baumeister introduces Greg Pilkington's report on reactions of the African American community to the second year of desegregation. Pilkington reports that he spoke to African American parents and students outside of Roxbury's Dearborn School, near the Orchard Park Housing Project. Pilkington reports that parents were more concerned with the state of the Dearborn School facilities than with school desegregation. Pilkington says that the courtyard of the school was covered with broken glass, and that the parents talked about complaining to school officials. Pilkington reports that the parents were aware of the arrival of white students from South Boston. Pilkington notes that the African American community has been largely indifferent to the busing of white students into their neighborhoods; that white attendance in schools located in African American neighborhoods continues to be low this year. Pilkington reports that 13 out of 250 whites attended the Dearborn School today; that the white students seemed apprehensive about attending the Dearborn; that one student said that she came "because her mother made her." Pilkington reports that another white student said that she had had a good experience at the Martin Luther King School during the previous school year. Pilkington reports that African American students being bused into South Boston waited at the Bayside Mall in Dorchester; that the buses departed the mall twenty-five minutes late because police needed to assure the safety of bus routes. Pilkington reports that three police officers were stationed outside of the Dearborn; that there was no sign of any trouble. Pilkington reports that the late arrival of buses delayed the start of school at the Dearborn. Pilkington says that he spoke to a teacher who only recently learned of her assignment to the Dearborn School; that she was anxious to spend some time painting and preparing her classroom. Pilkington reports on a debriefing held by the Freedom House in Roxbury; that all were invited to help contribute to a statement to be released the following day. Pilkington says that the gathering at the Freedom House focused on how to make school desegregation work. 1:24:38: Baumeister introduces Bullard's report on the opening day at Hyde Park High School. Bullard reports that opening day was peaceful; that seven US Marshals and almost 100 police officers were present at the school this morning. V: Shot of a photograph of racist graffiti on a mailbox in front of Hyde Park High School; of a police officer and a US Marshal in front of the school. Bullard reports that there were few residents gathered outside of the school; that white students arrived without incident around 7:15am. V: Shot of a photograph of white students entering the school yard of Hyde Park High School; of the arrival of African American students on buses; of white and African American students entering the school. Bullard reports that the buses carrying African American students arrived at 7:45; that white and African American students entered the school peacefully; that metal detectors were set up at the entrance to the school. Bullard reports that the atmosphere was calm at the close of school; that neighborhood residents did not heckle the African American students as they boarded the buses. V: Shot of photographs of African American and white students exiting Hyde Park High School; of white residents standing on the street outside of the school; of African American students boarding buses. Bullard reports that Hyde Park residents complained about the heavy police presence and the number of buses in the neighborhood; that residents were glad that the atmosphere at the school was calm. Bullard reports that a group of teachers and students told her that the atmosphere inside the school was very peaceful. V: Shots of photographs of a group of three white females and one African American female outside of the school; of three white females outside of the school. Bullard reports that 539 white students and 477 African American students attended Hyde Park High School out of a projected enrollment of 1600 students. 1:25:59: Baumeister reports that 11% to 23% of buses were late or did not show up at all; that 150 students at English High School did not have any transportation to the school's Occupational Resource Center; that only 2 of 12 buses picked up students at the Martin Luther King School; that buses arrived too late for some students at the Lewenberg School; that 2 buses did not arrive to pick up students at the Lewenberg School after school. Baumeister reports that each school bus is used for three routes; that if a bus is late on the first run, it will be late on subsequent runs. V: Footage of Baumeister asking Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) about transportation problems at a press conference at the Boston Schools Information Center. Leftwich says that he expects problems with bus routes to be resolved; that School Department staff is examining the bus routes in order to identify and eliminate problems; that he expects the buses to be running smoothly tomorrow morning. Baumeister closes the show. End credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/08/1975
Description: Evening Compass newscast during the first week of Phase II integration of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister reads school attendance statistics and reports on the stoning of a bus in Jamaica Plain. Pam Bullard reports on resistance to busing among Hyde Park parents. She interviews Hyde Park residents Paul Murphy, Ginny McCarthy, William Wager, Sylvia Connaughton, Pauline Haley, and Eddie Remondi. Remondi invokes the civil disobedience of Martin Luther King as a model for the antibusing movement. Gary Griffith reports on complaints of police brutality by Tactical Patrol Force officers in South Boston, Charlestown and Roxbury. Bill MacDonald, Joseph Rowan, William Johnston, Val Williams, and Kathy Fitzpatrick (all of the Boston Police Department) talk about the TPF and respond to the charges of brutality. Baumeister reports on how busing has affected East Boston. He interviews East Boston residents Rose DiScisio, Mina DeFilippo, Mrs. Jay DiGiangregorio and Evelyn Babin about busing. Judy Stoia interviews Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) about youth violence in Charlestown. Conway, Kearney and O'Shea complain that the media has exaggerated the violence in Charlestown; that youth violence is a problem across the city. Greg Pilkington reports on his conversation with James Nabrit (attorney for the plaintiffs, Brown v. Board of Education) about busing as a means to achieve school desegregation. Pilkington reports that Nabrit says that busing is a necessary remedy for school desegregation.
19:30:00: Ed Baumeister introduces the Evening Compass broadcast. Opening credits roll. Baumeister reports that today's school attendance was 52,631 out of 76,127; that school attendance has risen each day since school opened; that a bus carrying white students was stoned in Jamaica Plain. Baumeister comments that coverage of the busing crisis has moved from daily statistics to larger issues of resistance and a white minority school population. Baumeister reports that Bob Schwartz (Educational Advisor to the Mayor) fears that a minority white school system in Boston will lead to a decline in the quality of education; that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) favors a metropolitan desegregation plan. Baumeister reports that Thomas Atkins (President, NAACP) is not worried about a white minority population in the schools. 19:32:22: Pam Bullard reports on resistance to busing in Hyde Park. Bullard reports that over 600 African American students attend Hyde Park High School with 900 white students; that the school has been calm this year; that police are stationed outside of the school; that there was a heavy police presence in the school last year due to trouble between African American and white students; that residents of Hyde Park are still heavily opposed to busing. Visual: Footage of buses pulling up to Hyde Park High School; of white students walking toward the school; of African American and white students entering the school. Footage of Paul Murphy (Hyde Park parent) saying that he will never support busing; that the school appears calm but there is great tension within. Ginny McCarthy (Hyde Park parent) says that there is very strong antibusing sentiment in Hyde Park; that residents are not able to vent their feelings because of the strong police presence. William Wager (Hyde Park parent) says that he resents seeing police officers lining the streets. Sylvia Connaughton (Hyde Park parent) says that the antibusing movement has been silenced; that all forms of antibusing protest have been outlawed; that she will continue to fight the court order nonviolently. Pauline Haley (Hyde Park parent) says that the strong police presence does not allow for any form of protest. McCarthy says that antibusing residents will fight the court order through political means; that the antibusing movement must stay united and visible; that people should fight the court order, not leave the city. Connaughton agrees that the antibusing movement must stay active and visible; that the antibusing movement will not give up and accept busing. Eddie Remondi (Hyde Park parent) says that the antibusing movement must fight the court order through civil disobedience, citing the example of Martin Luther King; that the movement must fight in the courts and in the political arena. Wager says that the antibusing movement must create turmoil throughout the city through marches and lawful demonstrations; that the movement must avoid violence. 19:37:26: Baumeister introduces Gary Griffith's report on complaints lodged against the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) by residents of Charlestown, South Boston and Roxbury. V: Footage Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) saying that the TPF is a well-disciplined and effective unit with expertise in crowd control. Griffith reports that the TPF are the elite corps of the Boston Police Department; that residents of South Boston and Charlestown have charged the TPF with police brutality. V: Footage of TPF officers gathered at the side of a street in Charlestown. A traveling shot follows one officer to his car. Footage of Joseph Rowan (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) saying that the TPF reacts to violence directed at them by residents; that there may be isolated cases of brutality; that residents are encouraged to file complaints; that all complaints are investigated. Griffith reports that many TPF officers were previously regular duty police officers; that the TPF includes an emergency services unit, a canine unit, and an anti-crime unit; that TPF officers do not get paid more than regular police officers; that TPF officers may make additional money working overtime. V: Footage of Rowan saying that the TPF officers are carefully selected; that they are trained to work as a group; that TPF officers are stable, hardworking and are not afraid to perform their duties. Griffith reports that TPF officers have been called "drug-crazed animals." V: Footage of William Johnston (Boston Police Department) saying that that TPF officers are not "mean." Val Williams (Boston Police Department) says that the TPF has to deal with difficult situations; that rumors of TPF behavior have been exaggerated. Griffith asks Kathy Fitzpatrick (Boston Police Department) if she is involved in crowd control. She responds that she performs the same job as the men; that residents of South Boston and Charlestown are venting their frustration on the TPF. Griffith reports that TPF officers do not work in the neighborhoods; that they are called into difficult situations in which they must act quickly and forcefully. Baumeister asks Griffith if the TPF cultivates their fierce reputation in the city. Griffith says that the TPF officers like to play up their roles as "the hard guys"; that the TPF officers do not appreciate the rumors that circulate about TPF brutality; that he did not ask the officers about the allegations against TPF in the Rabbit Inn case or other cases. 19:43:16: Baumeister reports that East Boston has been the neighborhood least affected by court-ordered busing; that under Phase II desegregation, the East Boston district remains 95% white, 3% African American and 2% other minority; that the geographical isolation of the neighborhood makes the busing of students difficult; that the district high school will be open to students city-wide next year; that other East Boston schools will be unaffected next year. V: Footage of the entrance of the Callahan Tunnel. Traveling shot from a car driving through the tunnel. Baumeister reports that African American students have been bused into East Boston under Phase II desegregation; that buses are quietly escorted to the schools; that most students bused out of East Boston have chosen to attend city-wide magnet schools. V: Footage of a bus passing through toll booth. Footage of a white male student saying that he chose to attend Boston English High School because of its academic reputation; that he does not mind being bused; that his friends in East Boston tell him not to attend school. A white female student at a bus stop says that people tell her not to go to school. Shots of students boarding a bus in East Boston. Baumeister reports that many residents of East Boston strongly oppose busing. V: Footage of Rose DiScisio (East Boston resident) saying that many in East Boston will not allow their children to be bused; that there will be trouble in East Boston next year if students are bused out. Baumeister reports that DiScisio helps run the East Boston Information Center; that the East Boston Information Center is connected to ROAR (Restore Our Alienated Rights), the city-wide antibusing organization. Baumeister reports on the formation of two organizations formed to counter the antibusing movement in East Boston: EBQE (East Bostonians for Quality Education) and East Boston People Against Racism. V: Footage of Mina DeFilippo (East Boston resident) saying that she sends her children to Martin Luther King School in Dorchester; that her children are happy there; that she is a member of East Boston People Against Racism. Mrs. Jay DiGiangregorio (East Boston resident) says that her child has been sent to the Samuel Adams School in East Boston; that the school is overcrowded and lacks adequate facilities; that a nearby school is not overcrowded; that she will take her child out of the school system before the situation gets worse next year. DeFilippo says that her neighbors have insulted her in the streets for allowing her children to be bused; that she will continue to put her children on the bus. Evelyn Babin (East Boston resident) says that the antibusing movement is not causing trouble; that the other side tries to make the antibusing movement look bad. Baumeister reports that the organizations on both sides of the busing issue have support among East Boston residents; that many residents will wait until next year before getting involved in the busing debate. 19:50:16: Judy Stoia reports that the past two days have been relatively peaceful in Charlestown; that community leaders think reports of violence may have been exaggerated by the media. V: Footage of police officers lined up at an ice cream truck outside of Charlestown High School. Footage of Stoia interviewing Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. O'Shea says that it is normal for adolescents to act up; that the youth violence in Charlestown may not be related to race issues. Conway says that it is easy for kids to get caught up in the action of the moment. O'Shea says that very young children were caught up in an angry crowd on Monday evening; that it is dangerous for children to get caught up in violence. Conway says that racism is present in Charlestown, but not overwhelming; that one racist person can paint most of the graffiti in a neighborhood; that most people are concerned with the safety of their children. Kearney says that the majority of residents are shocked when they hear someone yell racial epithets at a bus of African American schoolchildren. Conway says that she has been active in the antibusing movement; that the antibusing movement has repudiated violence and has conducted peaceful demonstrations. Stoia comments that most people outside of Charlestown see it as a violent community. O'Shea says that violence is a problem in most urban environments; that there is violence in Charlestown, but it is still a good community. 19:55:07: Baumeister reports that the court case which brought desegregation to Boston schools is related to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case; that 17 lawyers worked to bring the Brown case to the US Supreme Court. Greg Pilkington reports that five of the lawyers from the Brown case have died; that four of those lawyers are now judges (Thurgood Marshall, Spotswood Robinson, Constance Baker Motley and Robert Carter). Pilkington reports on a conversation about busing with another one of the lawyers, James Nabrit, who is retired and living in Washington D.C. Pilkington reports that Nabrit said that quality education is not possible in a segregated school system; that Nabrit believes the antibusing movement is not sincere when they claim that the quality of education suffers under busing; that in a segregated system, African American schools will be of lesser quality than white schools; that both whites and African Americans suffer from the adverse effects of segregation; that busing is necessary remedy if it is the only way to desegregate schools. 19:57:36: Baumeister closes the show. He makes a joke about getting reading lessons before the next show to improve his delivery of the news. Credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/11/1975
Description: Press conference at Boston Schools Information Center to sum up week one of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister introduces the Boston School Report with a summary of the day's events. Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator, Mayor's Office) introduces the participants. Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) comments on a successful opening of schools. Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) gives a report on school suspensions and comments that the atmosphere in the schools is good. William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) comments on the opening week at South Boston High School. Pat Brady (Detective, Boston Police Department) reads a police report detailing arrests and injuries. Brady reports that there were no major incidents today and that extra police will continue to be deployed. Dr. Louis Perullo (Boston School Department) analyzes school attendance statistics. Perullo compares attendance statistics from the 1975-76 school year to attendance statistics from the 1974-1975 school year. Reporters ask Reid about an altercation at South Boston High School and the effect of community demonstrations on the atmosphere in the schools. Reid says that outside disturbances have a negative effect on the atmosphere inside the schools. Fahey says that she has no control over demonstrations outside of the school. Fahey reports on increased attendance at the city's magnet schools. Reporters ask Fahey and Perullo about school attendance and the possibility of a non-white majority in the Boston school population. Fahey says that she is not yet ready to predict a non-white majority. Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department) reports on the activity of federal marshals in Boston and the ongoing federal investigations into violations of the federal court order. Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey) announces a change in operating hours for the Boston Schools Information Center. This tape has audible time code on track 2 and visible time code burned in at the top of the picture.
17:00:00: Visual: Opening credits read Boston School Report. Press conference at Boston Schools Information Center sums up events during week one of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister gives a summary of the day's events: school attendance dropped to 68.4% from 69.1% on the previous day; six African American students were sent home after a scuffle with white students at South Boston High School; no suspensions at South Boston High School; three peaceful protest marches were held. Reporters at the press conference include Baumeister and Walt Sanders. 17:00:51: V: Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator, Mayor's Office) opens the press conference, reminding all that it is day five of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. He introduces the panel: Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School), Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey), Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department), Peter Meade (Mayor's Office). 17:01:52: V: Meade says that the school personnel deserve a lot of credit for their efforts; that students and parents deserve credit for behaving responsibly during the first week of Phase II desegregation. Meade says that the opening of schools was a success; that many doubted it would go as well as it did; that the city's problems are not over. 17:03:08: V: Fahey says that she is pleased with the progress made in the schools; that she would like to thank the staff of the school system; that ten African American males, 16 white males, five African American females and three white females were suspended over the past week. She introduces Dr. Louis Perullo (Boston School Department), who analyzes attendance statistics for the school system. She says that there were no arrests in the schools all week; that the atmosphere in the schools is good. 17:05:13: V: Brinn introduces Reid. Reid says that he prefers not to compare Phase I desegregation to Phase II; that they are more prepared this year; that he would like to see higher attendance figures; that the past week at South Boston High School was adequate. 17:06:38: V: Brinn stalls as he waits for Pat Brady (Detective, Boston Police Department). Brady reads a statement from Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). The statement reads that there were no major incidents today; that no students were injured in incidents related to school desegregation during the week; that the peaceful opening of schools was due to increased police presence and effective leadership by community leaders; that 112 arrests were made during the week; that 16 police officers were injured; that DiGrazia is pleased with the events of the past week; that extra police will continue to be deployed. 17:09:00: V: Perullo talks about statistics he has compiled. He compares attendance statistics from a Thursday and Friday during the first week of Phase I busing with statistics from a Thursday and Friday during the first week of Phase II. Attendance was down significantly on Friday at all levels during Phase I. Attendance was down slightly on Friday at the high schools and middle schools during Phase II; the elementary schools experienced a slight increase. Perullo says that school attendance usually drops on Fridays. Perullo introduces a table with total attendance by area and level of schooling. He finds that attendance did not change significantly from yesterday to today in any of the areas except high schools; that attendance at Jamaica Plain High School decreased 5.5%; that attendance at Hyde Park High School decreased 6.9%; that attendance at Dorchester High School decreased 5.0%; that attendance at South Boston High School and East Boston High School decreased 4.4% and 5.3% respectively; that attendance at the magnet high schools declined only slightly; that elementary schools in Roslindale saw an increase in attendance of 3.5%. Perullo says that high school attendance increased from 60.3% on Monday to 68% on Thursday; that high school attendance today was down 2.6% from Thursday; that middle schools increased from 60% on Monday to 70.3% on Wednesday; that middle school attendance was down ).7% from Wednesday; that elementary school attendance increased from 58.1% on Monday to 69.8% today. Perullo says that white attendance increased from 56.9% on Monday to 64% on Wednesday; that white attendance was down 1.8% from Wednesday; that African American attendance increased from 62.5% to a high of 75% on Thursday; that today's African American attendance was down 0.6%; that the attendance of other minorities increased from 55% on Monday to 75.9% on Friday. 17:14:52: V: Brinn invites questions from the media. Reporter asks Perullo if he can verify that white students comprise 46% of the school system while African Americans and other minorities comprise 54%. Perullo says he has not yet analyzed those numbers and cannot verify the statistic. Baumeister asks Fahey if she has investigated claims by Frank Power (Headmaster, Charlestown High School), that the projected enrollment numbers are high. Fahey says that she has no answer. Reid says that it is normal to plan for the attendance of every student who might attend, even those whose attendance is doubtful; that students drop out or move away over the summer; that it is difficult to compare actual enrollment to projected enrollment during the first week of school; that actual enrollment is usually less than projected enrollment. 17:17:41: V: A reporter asks Reid about the atmosphere at South Boston High School, as compared to the previous year. Reid says that he does not remember the climate last year; that he has had a good first week of school; that the students were restless today due to a prayer march and rumors of a walkout. A reporter asks Reid about a disturbance resulting in a request for state troopers at South Boston High School today. Reid says that he works closely with Major Gilligan (Massachusetts State Police Department); that Gilligan places troopers where he thinks they will be effective; that decisions concerning the number of troopers are made by him, Gilligan, and the officer in charge of the building; that an altercation at South Boston High School began with an African American student who said he was punched; that three African American students were brought to the office to file reports; that another altercation involving one of these three students occurred after lunch; that he is investigating the situation. 17:20:39: V: A reporter asks Reid if he finds prayer marches and demonstrations outside of the building disruptive. Reid says that any actions taken by the outside community create tension in the school. A reporter reminds Fahey that she had told him that demonstrations outside Charlestown High School had no negative effects on the African American students inside the building. Fahey says that she does not dispute Reid's analysis of the atmosphere in his school; that normal school activity is taking place despite marches in South Boston, Charlestown and Hyde Park; that it is not up to her to restrict parade permits for these marches. A reporter says that Headmaster Power had complained that the number of non-school personnel present at Charlestown High School made it difficult to operate the school. Reid says that he shares Power's concern; that the court order allows 12 community persons to be in the school; that two persons are sufficient to monitor activity and report on the atmosphere. 17:22:54: V: A reporter asks Fahey for observations on the performance of the magnet schools so far. Fahey says that attendance has increased at the magnet schools; that programs in conjunction with area universities will be implemented; that programs are currently under review include a program between English High School and University of Massachusetts as well as an open education program involving the Martin Luther King School and Antioch University. Baumeister asks Murphy if any charges have been filed in cases involving Molotov cocktails. Murphy says that no charges have been filed; that charges may be filed at the end of next week. Baumeister reminds Murphy that the local US attorney has already filed civil charges in one case. Murphy says his office is working together with the local US attorney. Baumeister asks if federal marshals have made any arrests on their own in the past week. Murphy says that they have made no arrests. Baumeister asks if they have been instructed to use restraint. Murphy says that they have been instructed to be professional. 17:24:38: V: A reporter asks Meade if he can share any Police Department intelligence. Meade replies that he does not attend the police intelligence briefings and if he did, he would not share the information. A reporter asks Meade if the mayor will continue to request that two battalions of the National Guard be on call for the city at the expense of $37,000 per day. Meade responds that the decision will be made jointly by the mayor and the governor; that the expense had not been discussed; that a reduction of troops in the public safety plan must be submitted to the court. A reporter asks Fahey if she knows the racial breakdown of the kindergarten population. Fahey says that the school department is making efforts to gather that data. A reporter asks Fahey about the possibility of white students becoming the minority in Boston schools. Fahey says that she is not yet ready to predict a non-white majority; that the school system is engaged in a recruitment program for students of all races; that white attendance has gone up in Roslindale elementary schools; that recruitment is going on in West Roxbury, Jamaica Plain and Brighton; that it is too soon to make predictions. 17:29:26: V: A reporter comments on the fact that white students are staying away from schools in African American communities. Fahey says that this is true; that white parents may be keeping children out until they are sure the schools are safe; that the safety of the schools has been demonstrated over the past week. A reporter asks Fahey how long she thinks parents will wait before sending their children. Fahey says that the decision is up to individual parents. Baumeister asks if Fahey has seen results from the campaign to attract students back to the schools. Fahey says she has not had feedback from teachers; that over the past week teachers have been calling the parents of absentee students; that over the next two weeks teachers will write letters to the parents; that teachers will make personal visits to parents if they get no response from the letters or phone calls. A reporter comments that many classes will be racially imbalanced if white students do not return to schools in the next few weeks. Fahey says that she will refer the matter to the court. A reporter asks if it will be easier for parents to transfer students to a new school if classes are deemed to be racially imbalanced. Fahey reviews the transfer procedure and says that a transfer might be accepted if it does not upset the racial balance in either school. 17:35:01: V: Brinn invites other questions. Brady says that two arrests have been reported since his last report. An African American juvenile male was arrested at the Barton Rogers School for disorderly conduct and an African American juvenile female was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon relating to an incident on September 9th at the temporary Madison Park High School. Brady confirms 112 arrests for the week. Reporter asks if the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) will be pulled out of South Boston. Brady responds that the TPF is stationed where it is needed. 17:36:46: V: Brinn invites Murphy to make a statement about the past week's events. Murphy says that he is happy that the federal marshals have made no arrests; that few arrests indicate that the situation is not so bad; that the marshals will continue to be stationed at the schools; that his office is investigating a dozen cases; that he does not expect a dozen indictments; that he is working on these cases with the state district attorney's office, the US attorney's office, the FBI, and the Bureau of Tobacco and Firearms. 17:38:28: V: Foley announces a change in operating hours for the Boston Schools Information Center. Foley says that the phone lines will be open until 5:30pm; that the center has received very few calls during the evenings. Fahey thanks the media and mentions that she will no longer attend press conferences on a regular basis; that she will be working hard to improve programs in the schools; that Boston is dealing with the same problems that many urban schools are facing. Fahey excuses herself. Brinn thanks the participants and the media, then closes the press conference. Baumeister gives a summary of the press conference.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/12/1975
Description: News conference with Martin Luther King, Sr. and others regarding voter registration. Footage includes shots of King and others at the press conference, the insides of a damaged church, and b-roll of the press conference. Mix of silent and wild sound.
Collection: WCVB Collection
Date Created: 07/30/1976