Description: Digital Corporation sponsors a demonstration of the evolution of voice technology at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. A moderator and a group of speakers answer questions from the audience about voice technology and computing technology. The speakers and audience discuss the importance of access to this technology by the blind and disabled. The moderator introduces musician Stevie Wonder. A short clip of Saturday Night Live is played, featuring Stevie Wonder as a news reporter. Wonder speaks to the audience about the opportunities provided to him through technology. He explains the transition from acoustic technology to a more visual technology in terms of music. Wonder discusses his experiences with technology and explains how he works with a Kurzweil reading machine, a DECtalk computer and a synthesizer to compose music. He explains how technology helps further opportunity. Wonder thanks the creators of this technology. Tape 1 of 2
0:59:59: Visual: A man stands at a podium, talking about the evolution of voice technology at a demonstration of the Kurzweil voice recognition machine at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. The man talks about the applications of voice technology in computer-assisted instruction. He talks about speech synthesis and speech recognition as two components of computer-assisted instruction devices. The man says that computer-assisted instruction devices can help young children learn. 1:01:36: V: The audience applauds. The moderator invites the audience to ask questions of the speakers. The speakers are gathered beside the podium, in front of a large banner for the Digital Corporation. The moderator talks about Digital's commitment to promoting and furthering technology in the interests of the company and the greater community. An audience member asks about the sales of the voice recognition machine. The moderator says that the product is successful; that sales figures are not the focus of this conference. 1:03:26: V: The man who spoke answers a question at the podium. The man talks about silicon technology. He says that the price of silicon chips will continue to decline. He says that his company has an active research and development team; that they are working hard to incorporate the latest technology into their products. The man predicts that the future will bring more powerful devices at lower costs; that companies in the field would like to provide computing devices which are affordable for individuals. Another man says that blind people can benefit from voice recognition machines which are available at their workplaces or through community organizations. He notes that blind people can access the machines in these ways, even if they cannot afford to buy one. The first man quotes a statistic indicating that two-thirds of all blind college students have access to a Kurzweil reading machine through their college campuses. The man notes that the Xerox Corporation donated reading machines to many college campuses. A third man approaches the podium. He says that many corporations are interested in donating machines to appropriate organizations; that corporations want to provide access to the machines. 1:05:33: V: The moderator tells the audience that there will be a question and answer period after the presentation of Stevie Wonder (pop singer). A fourth man talks about Wonder's Kurzweil music synthesizer. The man talks about Wonder's involvement with technology. The man talks about Wonder's accomplishments and his efforts to establish a holiday in honor of Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader). The man talks about recent awards given to Wonder. 1:07:00: V: The audience applauds as Wonder enters the room. A man guides Wonder to the podium. Wonder introduces a video presentation, which begins to play. The video presentation shows Wonder doing a parody of a music critic on Saturday Night Live (late night TV show). 1:09:09: V: Wonder talks about the opportunities provided to him through technology. Wonder talks about the contributions made to the technology which allows him to communicate more fully. Wonder says that technology is his "little sister, big brother, mother and father. I get inspired by it." He talks about learning and developing along with technology. Wonder says that he was first introduced to technology through learning the Braille language; that the Braille language provided him with a fundamental understanding of technology; that he applies that lesson to the machines he encounters today. Wonder says that technology has become more visual; that blind people need to be able to read or hear visual displays on machines. Wonder thanks the technological community for allowing him to access to technology through voice recognition. Wonder says that he used a Teleprompter for the blind during his appearance on Saturday Night Live. Wonder talks about his portable Braille machine, which allows him to access information on a cassette tape. Wonder talks about the pleasure of reading a book through the Kurzweil reading machine. Wonder talks about the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that the DECtalk machine can read Braille input in English. Wonder talks about the usefulness of the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that he will show the audience how the DECtalk machine can read the visual output of a Kurzweil machine, which allows him to use synthesizers without relying on visuals. Wonder says that he is frustrated that these machines are not more accessible to the blind. Wonder says that this technology must be made available to the handicapped and non-handicapped alike; that demand for the product will lead to greater access. Wonder urges the technology community to apply its skill to create greater access for all people. Wonder thanks the creators of the technology and the audience. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Martin Nolan (Boston Globe) opens a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Nolan talks about the novel. Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addresses the meeting. Flynn says that the novel is the first piece of journalism to report accurately on the busing crisis. Flynn says that he is pleased that the novel touches on class issues as related to school desegregation in Boston. Flynn talks about the poor institutional leadership that led to the deterioration of the Boston Public School System. He adds that parents were never consulted during the school desegregation process. Mark Roosevelt (Executive Director, John F. Kennedy Library) addresses the audience and compliments Lukas on his book. Lukas addresses the meeting. Lukas mentions the name of each family member portrayed in the novel. He asks them all to stand. He expresses his sadness at the absence of the McGoff family (family portrayed in Common Ground) from the meeting. Lukas notes each family's connection to John F. Kennedy (former US President). Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 1 of 8
0:59:58: Visual: A man addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). The man speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). The man introduces Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe). Nolan reads from a glowing review of Common Ground, written by Robert B. Parker (author) for the Chicago Tribune. Nolan praises the book. He talks about the book's attention to the people it portrays. Nolan says that the book is not about the "movers and the shakers," but it is about "the moved and the shaken." Nolan jokes that everyone in the audience is a minor character in the book. Nolan introduces Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston). Nolan says that Flynn is always searching for common ground among the residents of Boston. The audience applauds. 1:03:39: V: Flynn says that he is honored to address the audience. Flynn says that Lukas' book is the first piece of journalism to report accurately on the "real Boston." Flynn notes the complexity issues portrayed in the book. Flynn says that the vast majority of Bostonians occupied a "middle ground" during the busing crisis. Flynn says that Lukas listened to the residents of Boston who lived through the busing crisis; that Lukas found the common ground among these people. Flynn says that there are more issues that unite people than there are issues which divide people. Flynn says that people are looking for the same opportunities in education and training. Flynn adds that people in Boston are still struggling under the weight of social and economic injustice. Flynn talks about the need to give "poor people" an opportunity to receive a good education. Flynn says that he is pleased that Lukas's book tackles the issues of class. Flynn says that the deterioration of the school system in Boston was a result of poor institutional leadership. Flynn adds that no one individual or organization was responsible for the lack of leadership; that it reflects poorly on everyone in the city. Flynn says that the institutional responses to problems in education were unsatisfactory to parents and schoolchildren. Flynn adds that the schools needed to be desegregated and reformed. Flynn says that parents of schoolchildren were never consulted during the desegregation process. Flynn says that the busing crisis divided people along class lines; that education became a secondary concern. Flynn adds that "a wall of legal paper clouded the city of Boston." Flynn says that parents were powerless to effect change in the desegregation process. Flynn talks about his respect for the people in the audience and on the panel at the town meeting. Flynn cautions the audience and panelists at the town meeting not to spend the day rehashing the history of the busing crisis. Flynn says that the city of Boston must move forward and continue to find its "common ground." The audience applauds. 1:11:28: V: Nolan runs through the program for the town meeting. Nolan notes that two panelists are missing; that there are audience members in a second theater; that those audience members will be included in the discussion period. Nolan adds that each panelists will speak about Lukas' book. Nolan paraphrases Flynn in urging the panelists to focus on how the city of Boston can reach "common ground." Nolan introduces Mark Roosevelt (Executive Director, John F. Kennedy Library). Roosevelt introduces J. Anthony Lukas. Roosevelt thanks the audience and the panelists. Roosevelt thanks Lukas for his contribution to the city of Boston. Roosevelt says that Lukas's book has helped Boston residents to understand their differences and to see their city more clearly. The audience applauds. 1:14:51: V: Lukas thanks Roosevelt for making the town meeting possible. Lukas talks about his roots in New York City. Lukas says that his "heart is in Massachusetts." Lukas says that many audience members helped him with the book. He thanks those people. Lukas makes special mention of the families portrayed in the book. Lukas says that he sees the families as "collaborators" on the book, not as "subjects." Lukas talks about the candor, generosity and courage of the families who allowed themselves to be portrayed in the book. Lukas mentions each family member by name, and then invites them to stand as one. Lukas expresses his sadness that no member of the McGoff family is present. Lukas mentions the names of Rachel Twymon, Rachel Twymon (daughter), Michael Twymon, Cassandra Twymon, Wayne Twymon, Valerie Twymon, Reverend George Walker, Hasan Sharif, Joan Diver, Colin Diver, Brad Diver, Ned Diver, George McKechnie, Ethleen Diver, Norman McKechnie, Judy McKechnie. The audience applauds for the family members when they stand up. 1:18:44: V: Lukas notes that it is fitting that the town meeting be held at the JFK Library. Lukas adds that all three families were "charter members" of the Kennedy Coalition twenty-five years ago. Lukas says that Alice McGoff can remember seeing John F. Kennedy (former US President) march in the Bunker Hill Day Parade in 1946. Lukas talks about McGoff's enduring allegiance to Kennedy. Lukas says that Rachel Twymon used to listen to Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader) when he preached at the Twelfth Baptist Church in Roxbury. Lukas talks about Twymon's respect for the connection between King and Kennedy. Lukas notes that Joan Diver attended Kennedy's inauguration in 1960.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Archival soundbites of civil rights activists Martin Luther King Jr., Stokely Carmichael, H. Rap Brown, Malcolm X. Interviews with Robert Moses and Alvin Poussaint, who say we should not celebrate MLK alone, but remember the whole history of the civil rights movement. Sammy Davis Jr., Leonard Bernstein, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte participating in march.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/20/1986
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force has announced its candidate endorsements for the upcoming elections. Footage from a press conference at which the Task Force announces its slate of candidates. Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for State Representative) addresses the audience. The Task Force has generated controversy by endorsing some white candidates over African American candidates. Footage of Georgette Watson and Robert Rufo talking about Black Political Task Force endorsement. Jones interviews Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) about the endorsements. Clips of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP), Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist), and Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) commenting on the endorsements. Clips of Mel King (political activist) and Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) campaigning.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage of Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) addressing a crowd at a press conference in front of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial on Boston Common. Hardie talks about the mission of the Black Political Task Force. Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force was started in 1979; that the Task Force is comprised of 60 minority activists who collect dues, hold forums, and endorse candidates. V: Shots of a male Task Force member wearing a Bob Rufo campaign pin; of a female Task Force member; of Mel King (political acitivist) campaigning in Roxbury; of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts). Jones reports that the Task Force endorsed Mel King in the 1983 mayoral race; that they endorsed Michael Dukakis in the 1982 governor's race. V: Shots of African American campaign workers holding campaign signs for Georgette Watson (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff); of Bob Rufo (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff) shaking hands with Hardie. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Bob Rufo over Georgette Watson in the race for Suffolk County Sheriff. V: Footage of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) saying that the Task Force does not always have to endorse African American candidates; that Watson deserves the endorsement of the Task Force because she is a good leader. Footage of Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist) saying that the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo was unfair; that the endorsement was "a political slap in the face to Watson." Jones says that Watson was shaken by the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo. V: Footage of Watson with supporters at a press conference. Watson has tears in her eyes. Watson says that the Task Force's decision has been an "emotional experience"; that she is going to wage a winning campaign. Footage of Hardie at the Task Force press conference. Hardie says that Rufo is a better candidate for the position than Watson. Footage of Rufo saying that the race is important to him; that the voters need to decide which candidate is most qualified for the position. Rufo says that he hopes that the endorsement does not become an issue between him and Watson. Jones says that the Task Force announced its full slate of candidates at the press conference today. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Rufo for Suffolk County Sheriff, Gerry D'Amico for lieutenant governor, Jo Ann Shotwell for attorney general, Byron Rushing for state representative for the ninth Suffolk District. Jones notes that the Task Force endorsed Salvatore DiMasi over Regina Placid for state representative of the third Suffolk District. V: Shots of Rufo at the Task Force press conference; of Gerry D'Amico (candidate for lieutenant governor) at the press conference; of Jo Ann Shotwell (candidate for state attorney general) at the press conference; of Byron Rushing (candidate for state representative) at the press conference. Footage of Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for state representative) at the Task Force press conference. DiMasi says that this endorsement shows that people from different communities and ethnic backgrounds are working together. DiMasi says that he is proud to receive the Task Force's endorsement. Footage of Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) saying that the Task Force's endorsement does not represent the true voice of the African American community. Footage of Hardie at the press conference. Hardie says that the Task Force is accustomed to the controversy which often accompanies their endorsements. Jones stands on the Boston Common. Jones reports that no one can predict if the Task Force's endorsements will make a difference in the upcoming elections. Jones notes that critics of the Task Force say that their endorsements may backfire. Jones says that some critics predict that the African American community may back the African American candidates not backed by the Task Force.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/25/1986