Description: Martin Luther King, Jr. received his doctorate of theology from Boston University in 1955, and he donated more than 80,000 personal papers to the university before he died. Coretta Scott King has filed suit against the university to get the papers returned to her. Interviews with students on campus about whether BU should return the papers to Scott King. The law firm of Melvin Miller, a BU Trustee, is handling the case for the university. Miller has accused Scott King of trying to profit from her husbands' materials. Scott King does not believe that King's agreement with the university is binding. Interview with BU Vice President Greg Felker and Black Student Union President Kiphanie Radford about the case. Shots of the papers and footage of Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King. This tape includes additional footage of King's papers on display at BU.
1:00:10: Visual: Black and white footage of Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) delivering the "I Have a Dream" speech. Marcus Jones reports that King was one of Boston University's most distinguished graduates; that King received his doctorate of theology from the university in 1955; that a statue in honor of King was placed on the campus after his assassination in 1968. V: Shots of students on the BU campus near the statue honoring King; of the statue honoring King. Jones reports that King donated more than 80,000 personal papers to the university before he died; that Coretta Scott King (widow of King) wants the papers returned to her. V: Black and white shots of King. Shots of the King papers on display; of Coretta Scott King. Jones reports that Coretta Scott King has filed suit against BU. V: Shot of Coretta Scott King standing near the Martin Luther King's grave. Footage of a white male student saying that the university should give the papers back; of an Asian American female student saying that BU is within its rights to keep the papers. Footage of a white female student saying that BU should return the papers if they are not being cared for properly. Footage of a male student saying that Coretta Scott King should have the papers. Jones reports that the law firm of Melvin Miller (BU Trustee) is handling the case for the university; that Miller accuses Coretta Scott King of trying to make a profit from her husband's written material. V: Footage of Miller addressing an audience. Shot of a newspaper article in The Daily Free Press with a headline reading, "Miller: Mrs. King not telling the truth." Footage of King delivering the "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington in 1963. Shot of Coretta Scott King. Jones reports that Coretta Scott King claims that Martin Luther King had changed his mind about keeping his papers at BU before his death. Jones notes that Miller disputes the claim by Coretta Scott King. V: Footage of Greg Felker (Vice President, BU Student Union) saying that BU should return the papers. Felker adds that there is evidence to support Coretta Scott King's claim that Martin Luther King changed his mind about housing the papers at BU. Footage of Kiphanie Radford (President, BU Black Student Union) saying that there may be merit in BU's refusal to return the papers. Shot of King's papers on display. Text of a quote from King is displayed on screen. Jones quotes a letter written by King to BU: "In the event of my death, all such materials deposited with the University shall become from that date the absolute property of Boston University." Jones says that Coretta Scott King claims that King's letter is not binding. V: Shots of Coretta Scott King at the grave of Martin Luther King; of a sign for the Martin Luther King Jr. reading room at Boston University. Jones stands on the BU campus. Jones reports that the public outcry surrounding the issue has not convinced BU to return the papers. Jones adds that BU is scheduled to respond to Coretta Scott King's charges on Monday, which is the anniversary of King's death.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/01/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that James Farmer (civil rights leader) spoke at Faneuil Hall during a ceremony to commemorate the death of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Jones notes that Farmer was the head of the Congress for Racial Equality in the 1950s. Jones' report includes footage of Farmer addressing the audience at Faneuil Hall. Jones interviews Farmer about progress on civil rights issues in the US. Jones reports that Charles Yancey read a proclamation honoring King during the ceremony at Faneuil Hall. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of Yancey reading a proclamation at the ceremony and by footage of schoolchildren performing at the ceremony. Jones' report also includes footage of King during the civil rights movement. This tape includes additional footage from the ceremony at Faneuil Hall. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Jesse Jackson (Democratic candidate for US President) has released position papers, detailing his stance on domestic issues
1:00:04: Visual: Black and white footage of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader) delivering a speech. Black and white footage of a white man announcing the death of King to a group of students. Marcus Jones reports that today is the twentieth anniversary of King's death. Jones reports that James Farmer (civil rights leader) talked to an audience at a ceremony commemorating King's death at Faneuil Hall. V: Footage of Farmer addressing an audience at Fanueil Hall. Farmer talks about King's vision for the nation. Shots of the audience. Jones reports that Farmer was the head of the Congress for Racial Equality in the 1950s; that Farmer is now a visiting professor at Mary Washington College in Virginia. Jones says that Farmer believes that minorities have made great strides in the past twenty years. V: Footage of Farmer being interviewed by Jones at Faneuil Hall. Farmer says that there are plenty of things that need to change in the US; that some progress has been made by minorities. Jones reports that Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) read a city proclamation honoring King at the ceremony at Faneuil Hall. V: Footage of Yancey addressing the audience. Yancey says that King was once refused admittance to the Patrick T. Campbell Junior High School in Boston; that the school is now named for King. Jones reports that students from the Martin Luther King Middle School performed a song in honor of King. V: Footage of students from the King Middle School performing at Faneuil Hall. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/04/1988
Description: Jan von Mehren reports that Ralph Abernathy (author and civil rights activist) has written a book about his experiences in the civil rights movement with Martin Luther King, Jr. Von Mehren notes that Abernathy signed copies of the book in Cambridge; she adds that the book is called, And The Walls Came Tumbling Down. Von Mehren reports that the book is controversial because Abernathy has revealed King's human side and his faults. Von Mehren's reports includes footage of the book signing in Cambridge. Michael Dorn (Cambridge resident) says that he would rather not know compromising information about his heroes. Von Mehren interviews Abernathy. Abernathy says that King would have wanted him to write this book. Von Mehren notes that Morris Dees (Southern Poverty Law Center) is one of the leading critics of the book. Von Mehren reviews Abernathy's career in the civil rights movement. Von Mehren's reports includes footage of Abernathy speaking at the Cambridge Baptist Church, and later gathered in the church with Mel King and others. Von Mehren's report also includes clips of Abernathy and King from the film, From Montgomery to Memphis. After the edited story, there is additional black and white footage from From Montgomery to Memphis.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/08/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Mamie Till-Mobley (civil rights activist) received a lifetime activism award from a Massachusetts senior citizen action group. Jones reports that Till-Mobley's son, Emmett, was brutally murdered in Mississippi in 1955. Jones notes that Till-Mobley's determination to bring the murderers to justice has been an inspiration to other African Americans. Jones notes that the Eyes On The Prize series has brought attention to Till-Mobley's role in the civil rights movement. Jones' report includes footage from Eyes on the Prize. Jones reports that James Farmer (civil rights activist) also received an award from the organization. Jones' report features footage of Farmer and Till-Mobley at a press conference after the awards ceremony. Jones interviews Till-Mobley, who discusses her role in the civil rights movement. Jones notes that Till-Mobley has organized the Emmett Till players, who travel with Mobley to spread the message of the civil rights movement. Jones' report includes footage of performances at the awards ceremony by Ericka Elcy and Patrice Richardson of the Emmett Till Players.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Mamie Till-Mobley talking about the civil rights movement. Till-Mobley says that she wanted the world to see the horrible events taking place in the US. Marcus Jones reports that the brutal murder of Emmet Louis Till startled the nation in 1955; that Emmet Louis Till was from Chicago; that Emmet Louis Till was visiting relatives in Mississippi in 1955. Jones reports that Emmet Louis Till said "Bye, baby" to a white woman when exiting a grocery store; that Emmet Louis Till's body was found in the Tallahatchie River a few days later. V: Footage from Eyes On The Prize of Emmet Louis Till's funeral. Shots of a black and white photo of Emmet Louis Till; of Bryant's grocery store in Mississippi; of a river. Footage from Eyes on the Prize of Mamie Till-Mobley at a press conference. Shots of whites seated in an audience. Jones reports that Till-Mobley's determination to bring her son's murderers to justice was an inspiration to other African Americans. V: Black and white footage from Eyes On The Prize of Rosa Parks (civil rights activist); of Martin Luther King Jr. (civil rights leader); of a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama; of white people seated at the front of a bus. Footage of Mamie Till-Mobley and James Farmer (civil rights activist) at a press conference in Boston in June of 1988. Till talks about her quest for justice in 1955. Shots of reporters at the press conference. Till-Mobley and Farmer embrace. Jones reports that Till-Mobley and Farmer received lifetime activism awards from a Massachusetts senior citizen action group. V: Shots of members of the action group seated in a room. Footage of Alfred Saunders (member of the senior citizen action group) greeting Till-Mobley. Footage of Saunders saying that Till-Mobley's commitment to justice inspired the civil rights movement. Footage of Ericka Elcy (member, Emma Till Players) performing in front of the members of the senior citizen group. Elcy says that people must be committed to their goals and life's work. Jones reports that Till-Mobley has organized a group in Chicago called the Emma Till Players; that the young people in the Emma Till Players travel with Till-Mobley to spread the message of the civil rights movement. V: Footage of Patrice Richardson (member, Emma Till Players) performing. Richardson reciting a speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. Shots of Till, Farmer and the audience applauding for Richardson. Footage of Till-Mobley talking about how her role in the civil rights movement may have gotten lost in history. Till-Mobley says that her role in the movement stems from an "ugly" incident; that no one wants to remember "ugly" incidents. Footage from Eyes On The Prize of Till-Mobley in 1955. Till-Mobley says that she hopes that her son's death will mean something to other oppressed people. Shots of Till-Mobley at her son's funeral. Jones reports that the Eyes On The Prize series has shed light on Till-Mobley's role in the civil rights movement. V: Footage of Till-Mobley being interviewed by Jones. Till-Mobley says that she is interested in seeing a renewal of activism; that kids today need to be directed toward positive ways of living; that drugs and gangs are a problem for youth today.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/24/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports on Northeastern University's observation of the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. Jones notes that a ceremony commemorating King's life was held at the university. Jones' report includes footage from the ceremony. Sonia Sanchez (poet and teacher) talks about King. Jones' report also includes footage of King. Susan Sullivan (Northeastern Law student) makes the announcement that the university is awarding an honorary law degree to Nelson Mandela. Interviews with Daniel Givelber (Dean, Northeastern University School of Law) and Sullivan about the decision to award a degree to Mandela. Jones notes that the university trustees overturned a policy which required recipients of degrees to pick them up in person. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: David Scondras, Charles Yancey and Ray Flynn: Boston City Council makes fair housing policy
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of an African American man performing a song at a ceremony commemorating the life of Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) at Northeastern University. Shots of the audience. Marcus Jones reports that hundreds of people gathered at Northeastern to commemorate the life of King; that King's 59th birthday is Friday. V: Shots of King addressing a crowd; of King marching at the head of a group of civil rights demonstrators. Footage of Sonia Sanchez (poet and teacher) talks about King's struggle to advance the cause of civil rights. Sanchez says that King's work is not finished. Shots of audience members applauding. Jones reports that Sanchez was the featured speaker at the ceremony; that the remarks of Susan Sullivan (Northeastern Law student) were the highlight of the event. V: Footage of Sullivan announcing that the Board of Trustees at Northeastern University has decided to award an honorary law degree to Nelson Mandela (jailed South African leader). The crowd applauds. Jones reports that Northeastern law students have petitioned the university for three years to grant a degree to Mandela. V: Shot of the entrance to the library at Northeastern Law School. Shot of a paper taped to the door of the library. A handwritten note on the paper reads, "Trustees grant Mandela Honorary Degree." Jones reports that the request had been previously denied due to a policy which required recipients of degrees to pick them up in person. Jones notes that Mandela has been jailed by the South African government because of his opposition to apartheid. V: Black and white footage of Mandela speaking; of a sign for Pollsmoor Prison, where Mandela is held. Jones notes that the university's decision to accede to the demands of students and faculty is unprecedented. V: Footage of Jones interviewing Daniel Givelber (Dean, Northeastern University School of Law). Givelbar says that Northeastern has an unusually diverse group of Trustees; that the Trustees felt like they were doing the right thing. Givelbar notes that the Board of Trustees made the decision to divest two years ago. Footage of Susan Sullivan saying that the degree should have been granted when the students first petitioned for it; that the law students should not have had to fight so hard for it. Sullivan says that international recognition could hasten Mandela's release from jail. Jones notes that the scheduled protest by the students turned into a celebration. Jones says that Northeastern students hope that other universities will follow Northeastern's example.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on controversy over a new student assignment plan for the Boston Public Schools, which minority members of the Boston School Committee spoke out against at a breakfast commemorating the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.. School Committee members John O'Bryant, Juanita Wade, Jean McGuire, and Gerald Anderson speak to the media. They do not believe that the plan will provide equitable education for all. The plan was proposed by mayor Ray Flynn. It will allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend. Interview with Flynn, who defends the proposal, saying that it's supported by parents. He adds that School Committee members have been asked for input on the plan. Vaillancourt also reports that Flynn has proposed the decentralization of the Boston School Department and selling off the headquarters of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt reports that minority members of the School Committee may rescind their support for superintendent Laval Wilson if he supports Flynn's school choice proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Elma Lewis in Marsh Chapel at Boston University on Martin Luther King Day and Carmen Fields interviews Robert Nemiroff about the playwright Lorraine Hansberry
1:00:26: Visual: Footage of city and state leaders including Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), Bernard Cardinal Law (Archidiocese of Boston), and Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) singing together at celebration in honor of the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Meg Vaillancourt reports that local leaders gathered over breakfast today to celebrate Martin Luther King's birthday. Vaillancourt notes that there was controversy at the breakfast over a new assignment plan for students in Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of Juanita Wade (Boston School Committee) speaking to the media. School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire sit beside Wade. Wade calls the new plan "segregation redux." Wade says that the Boston Public Schools need to provide choice, equity, and a quality education right now. Footage of Flynn speaking to the media. Flynn says that the plan has the support of the citizens of Boston; that parents are looking for this kind of reform. Vaillancourt reports that the new plan would allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend; that parents have not been able to choose schools since school desegregation began in 1974. V: Shots of buses pulling up to the front of South Boston High School in 1974; of South Boston residents jeering at the buses. Shots of buses parked in front of South Boston High School; of African American students walking among the buses. Vaillancourt notes that the population of white students in Boston Public Schools has declined since 1974; that non-white students make up 70% of the student population in Boston Public Schools. Vaillancourt adds that the School System has been criticized for not providing students with a quality education. V: Shots of non-white students in a classroom; of an African American male student sitting in a classroom. Shot of Flynn. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and two consultants have proposed a plan to improve the schools and to increase parental choice. V: Footage of School Committee members O'Bryant, Wade, McGuire, and Gerald Anderson sitting on a couch. African American community leaders, including Charles Yancey (Boston City Council), Eugene Rivers (African Peoples Pentecostal Church) and Louis Elisa (Boston chapter of the NAACP), stand behind them. Anderson addresses the media. Anderson says that the Boston School System needs to provide a quality education to all before it can claim to be equitable. Anderson says that the mayor needs to provide more funding to the schools. Shots of O'Bryant and other community leaders. Footage of Flynn being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Flynn if he is surprised by the attitude of the African American community leaders. Flynn says that he has been working on the proposal for several months; that community leaders have had many opportunities to review and give input on the proposal. Footage of Anderson saying that he is offended by Flynn's attitude. Anderson notes that Flynn has said that the statements of the African American leaders are "bogus." Anderson says that the community leaders are standing up for their constituents; that Flynn's statements are "bogus." Footage of Flynn saying that the members of the School Committee have had input on the proposal; that the members of the School Committee voted twelve-to-one in favor of the plan. Flynn says that the School Committee members were told that they would have further opportunities to give input on the proposal. Footage of McGuire saying that Flynn's proposal will cost more money. McGuire says that the School Committee has not been given additional money to fund Flynn's proposal. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Public School System spends more money per student than any other public school system in the nation. V: Shot of an African American teacher and student at the front of a classroom; of a white male student seated in a classroom; of an African American female student seated in a classroom. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn has come up with another controversial proposal to fund neighborhood schools; that Flynn has suggested the decentralization of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt adds that the proposal would sell off the downtown headquarters of the Boston School Department on Court Street. V: Shots of the exterior of the Boston School Department headquarters. Footage of Flynn saying that the downtown headquarters of the School Department should be sold; that the money should be put into neighborhood schools. Footage of O'Bryant saying that the School System is going to end up back in court if it does not receive support from the city. Vaillancourt reports that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has supported Flynn's school choice plan; that Wilson's contract ends in June. V: Shots of a meeting in the chambers of the Boston School Committee; of Wilson speaking at a School Committee meeting. Vaillancourt reports that the African American members have voted to extend Wilson's contract in the past. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson's future support among the Committee's African American members may depend on his position on Flynn's school choice plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/16/1989
Description: Christopher Lydon interviews cultural historian Kiku Adatto (Harvard University) about Jesse Jackson as a presidential candidate. Lydon's interview with Adatto is accompanied by footage of Jackson throughout his political career. The footage illustrates Jackson's dynamic style of speaking. Adatto notes that Jackson is a religious figure in the political arena. She notes that Jackson's energy and moral fervor are more suited to a preacher than a politician. She says that Jackson's strength lies in his ability to articulate social criticism. Adatto says that many voters see Jackson as an outsider or a social critic instead of as a politician; she adds that some voters may not be able to envision him as president. Lydon's report also includes footage of Martin Luther King, Jr. (American civil rights leader) and Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta).
1:00:02: Christopher Lydon interviews Kiku Adatto (Harvard University) about Jesse Jackson (candidate for the Democratic nomination for US President). Adatto talks about the tradition of preachers in American history. She says that many of these preachers, including Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) and Jackson, have become political leaders. Visual: Shot of a black and white photo of Jackson on a balcony with King. Black and white footage of King giving a speech. Shot of a black and white photo of Jackson in a crowd, raising his arm in the black power salute. Adatto says that Jackson has tried to pick up the mantle of King; that Jackson has tried to be the "conscience of America" in the way that King was. V: Footage of Jackson addressing a crowd at Harvard University on April 4, 1985. Jackson talks about the evils of apartheid. Adatto says that there is a tradition in the US of the preacher staying outside of politics; that Jackson has tried to move into the political system in order to effect change. V: Footage of Jackson passing a lobby of a building. He shakes hands with African American bystanders. Jackson enters a room full of supporters. Adatto says that Jackson is concerned with equality and civil rights; that Jackson has been caught exhibiting prejudice against Jews; that Jackson was linked with Reverend Louis Farrakhan (African American Muslim leader). V: Shots of newspaper articles detailing the controversy surrounding Jackson's remarks about Jews in 1984. Adatto adds that the preacher must remain "morally sound" when entering the political arena. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. Adatto says that Jackson has an "insider-outside dilemma"; that Jackson finds it difficult to make the compromises required by electoral politics. Adatto notes that Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) made an easy transition into electoral politics. V: Shot of Young at a press conference in Boston in 1983. Adatto notes that Jackson has lost none of his energy or "moral fervor"; that Jackson still criticizes society from an outsider's point of view. Adatto adds that Young is an "insider." V: Shot of Young at a press conference. Adatto says that Jackson strength lies in his ability to articulate social criticism. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. Shots of audience members. Adatto says that Jackson stirs the emotions of voters in his "outsider" role; that Jackson troubles many voters in his "insider" role. Adatto notes that Jackson's role as social reformer and critic undermines his strength as a presidential candidate; that many voters cannot envision Jackson as president. Adatto notes that many of the nation's great presidents have been calm and quietly strong; that some see Jackson as too much of a preacher; that Jackson's energy and moral fervor are more suited to preacher than politician. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. Adatto says that some see voters as too much of an outsider, social critic or civil rights leader; that some white voters are turned off by Jackson. Adatto quotes statistics from a study which found that 23% of American voters are not ready to vote for any African American for president. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. Adatto says that Jackson has the ability to stir the emotions of the American people; that he is most powerful in his role as "outsider" or critic. Adatto says that many voters are stirred by his message, but cannot envision him as president because he is an outsider. V: Footage of Jackson announcing his candidacy for president in 1988. His supporters stand behind him, cheering. Jackson promises "bold leadership."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/16/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the civil rights documentary series, Eyes on the Prize. Jones notes that Eyes on the Prize is a six-part series documenting the first decade of the civil rights movement, using historical footage and first-hand accounts to tell the story. Jones interviews Henry Hampton (documentary filmmaker). Jones notes that Hampton's production company, Blackside Incorporated, produced the series. Hampton says that the civil rights movement is often overshadowed by the memory of Martin Luther King, Jr. Hampton says that Eyes on the Prize attempts to tell the stories of lesser-known civil rights activists. Hampton adds that the series is a testament to the power of ordinary people to effect great changes. Jones's report is accompanied by footage from Eyes on the Prize.
1:00:12: Visual: Black and white footage of A. Philip Randolph (civil rights leader) introducing Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) at the March on Washington in 1963. Shots of the crowd on the National Mall; of King standing before the crowd. Black and white footage of King being arrested by police; of King in prison with another African American civil rights protester. Shot of white people standing in the bed of a pickup truck. The Confederate flag is draped over the side of the truck; of two white boys making racist comments while waving a small Confederate flag. Marcus Jones talks about the legacy of King. Jones notes that King was a martyr for civil rights; that he was taunted by white racists. V: Black and white footage of John Patterson (Governor of Alabama) saying that King should leave Alabama because he is a "menace." Shot of King marching peacefully with other protesters. Jones reports that King was mocked by Black Power advocates; that student leaders second guessed his plans. V: Footage of H. Rap Brown (Black Power advocate) saying that the civil rights movement is dead. Footage of Stokely Carmichael (black student leader) saying that white leaders do not know what is good for black America. Footage of King preaching against violence. Audio of a gunshot. Jones reports that King embodies the civil rights movement for many; that King's memory sometimes overshadows the civil rights movement. V: Shot of King lying in his casket. Footage of King and civil rights supporters in January, 1956. King talks about the right of African Americans to protest. Footage of Henry Hampton (documentary filmmaker) saying that King would want to be seen as a small part of the civil rights movement; that Martin Luther King Day should be a testament to King as well as the accomplishments of the civil rights movement. Jones says that Hampton wants to set the record straight about the civil rights movement; that the civil rights movement was America's "second revolution;" that the civil rights movement is most often recounted through the life of King. V: Footage of civil rights demonstrators marching. One of the black demonstrators is being interviewed by a white journalist. Shots of the feet of the marching demonstrators. Jones notes that the experiences of the lesser-known demonstrators are important. V: Footage of the animated opening to the Eyes on the Prize series. Footage of Hampton saying that the series is a testament to the power of ordinary people to effect great changes. Excerpt from Eyes on the Prize, showing civil rights supporters picketing lunch counters in the South. Jones reports that Eyes on the Prize was produced by Hampton's company, Blackside Incorporated; that Eyes on the Prize recalls the first decade of the civil rights movement. Jones notes that the series is comprised of six parts; that the series will air on PBS. V: Shots of signs for "colored lunch counters" and "colored waiting rooms." Shots of King; of Lyndon B. Johnson (US President) signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Footage from Eyes on the Prize of African American students entering Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. Melba Pattillo Beals (Central High School Junior) talks about her experiences as an African American student integrating the school. Jones says that the series uses first-hand accounts and historical footage to tell the story of the civil rights movement. V: Footage of a group of white men pushing an African American man down a street; of King reciting the "I have a dream" speech. Audio of Hampton saying that King was only a small part of a very large civil rights movement. Footage of Reverend C.T. Vivian (civil rights leader) confronting Sheriff Jim Clark in Selma, Alabama. Footage of Hampton saying that the stories of lesser-known civil rights activists have not been told. Hampton talks about the efforts of Diane Nash (civil rights acitivist) in Nashville. Shots of civil rights demonstrators in Nashville. Footage of Nash saying that she asked the Ben West (Mayor of Nashville) if segregation was wrong. Footage of West saying that Nash made him realize that segregation was morally wrong. Shots of Nash; of King. Jones says that many Americans remember the civil rights movements through the memory of King; that the civil rights movement was made up of many dreamers like King. V: Footage of King at the March on Washington. Shots of marchers at the March on Washington; of civil rights demonstrators being arrested by police; of civil rights demonstrators chanting and clapping.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports that state and local officials have come through with funding for a multi-million dollar program to revitalize Grove Hall, which is Roxbury's business district. The area has experienced hard times since the late 1960s. Press conference to announce the revitalization program. City Councilor Charles Yancey and Mayor Ray Flynn talk about the program to revitalize the district. Jones walks through district while conducting an interview with Walter Little, the Executive Director of the Neighborhood Development Association of Grove Hall. Little talks about the revitalization program and the development of the area. Little notes that there is a high concentration of subsidized housing in the area. Little talks about the history of the area, noting that the district once had a large Jewish population. Jones notes that the revitalization program will benefit current and future residents of the area. Following the edited is additional footage from the press conference and Jones' interview with Little while walking through the Grove Hall District.
1:00:23: Visual: Footage of Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) at a ceremony to mark the revitalization of Grove Hall. Yancey says that the revitalized Grove Hall will develop into the best community in the city of Boston. Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) at the ceremony. Flynn says that the concerns of the Grove Hall community will no longer be ignored. Shots of the neighborhood; of signs for the Grove Hall Cafe and the Boston Legal Assistance Project. Marcus Jones reports that state and local officials have finally come through with a multi-million dollar program aimed at revitalizing Roxbury's business district. Jones notes that the area has experienced hard times ever since the riots which followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader) in 1968. V: Shot of Jones in the Grove Hall district with Walter Little (Executive Director, Neighborhood Development Association of Grove Hall). Jones asks about a boarded up building on the street. Shot of a woman crossing the Street. Footage of Little standing with Jones. Little says that three tenants of one building have now become owners of the properties on the block. Little says that local residents must have the opportunity to participate in the ownership and development of a property. Shot of the streets in the area. Jones remarks that Little has lived in this area for forty years. V: Shot of a "No Trespassing" sign on a boarded-up building; of another boarded-up building. Footage of Little saying that the area has the largest concentration of subsidized housing of any area in the city; that there are 2800 subsidized units within the Grove Hall boundaries. Little says that economic balance is important to the survival of a commercial district. Little says that the small shops currently in the Grove Hall area are not enough to support a thriving commercial district. Little notes that many of the current businesses are fairly new to the area. Jones reports that Little remembers when there was a large Jewish population in the area; that Siegel's cafeteria was a popular restaurant in those days. V: Shot of Jones and Little walking on in the Grove Hall District, near a liquor store which once was Siegel's Cafeteria. Footage of Little saying that Siegel's Cafeteria closed in the early 1970s; that they were one of the last businesses to leave the area. Shot of the front of the liquor store; of two women walking on the street. Shot of a boarded-up apartment building. Jones reports that the revitalization plan aims to benefit the current and future residents of the Grove Hall area. V: Footage of Little saying that the money is available for the project; that buildings in the area will no longer be boarded up after the revitalization. Shot of Jones and Little on the street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/20/1988
Description: Christy George reports that Jesse Jackson spoke about leadership in a speech at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. George reports that Jackson is very active in this non-election year. George's report includes footage of Jackson walking a picket line with striking Eastern Airline employees and footage of Jackson visiting an Armenian earthquake zone. George talks about Jackson's activities since the 1988 election. George's report also features footage from Jackson's speech at Harvard. Jackson talks about voter cynicism in the 1988 election and the qualities of a good leader. Jackson says that the US must invest in itself in order to flourish. He explains a metaphorical term: "honeybee sense." George's report also includes footage from Jackson's 1988 presidential campaign. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Lee Atwater visits Massachusetts for a Republican Party fundraiser
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) as he enters an auditorium at the John F. Kennedy School of Goverment at Harvard University. The audience applauds for Jackson. Shot of a man in the crowd. Footage of Jackson addressing the audience. Jackson jokes about his speech being televised on C-Span. Jackson waves to his mother. Christy George reports that Jackson talked about the scarcity of good leaders in American politics during his speech at the Kennedy School of Government. V: Footage of Jackson delivering his speech. Jackson says that public cynicism won more voters than Bush did in the 1988 campaign. Jackson notes that 50% of the eligible voters did not vote; that 70% of voters expressed a desire for a different choice. Jackson says that Bush's campaign won while the country lost. Footage of Jackson at a campaign rally in New Hampshire on February 16, 1988. The crowd chants, "Win, Jesse, Win." George notes that Jackson travels the country regularly in non-election years. V: Shots of Jackson doing a television interview; of Jackson picketing with striking Eastern Airline employees. George reports that Jackson has walked with striking Eastern Airline employees across the nation; that Jackson turned a tour of an Armenian earthquake zone into a Soviet-American people's summit. V: Shot of a Soviet news anchor reading the news; of Jackson kissing a baby in Armenia. Footage of Jackson looking out of a window while riding on a bus in Armenia. Jackson speaks to the media, saying that human beings must care for one another. Footage of Jackson at a 1988 campaign rally. George calls Jackson a "perpetual candidate" and a "peripatetic preacher." V: Footage of Jackson speaking at the Kennedy School. Jackson says that he is a "liberal" who fights for change. Jackson says that pollsters and pundits are looking for a manufactured candidate. Jackson says that great leaders do not follow opinion polls; that great leaders mold public opinion. Jackson says that John F. Kennedy (former US President) was not following opinion polls when he reached out to Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Jackson says that Kennedy's actions were based on courage and principles. Jackson says that the US needs bold leadership to deal with the nation's "structural crisis." Jackson talks about "honeybee sense." Jackson says that honeybees know to drop pollen when they pick up nectar; that honeybees know the importance of keeping the flowers alive. Jackson says that the US needs to invest in itself in order to stay alive and flourish. The crowd rises to its feet and applauds for Jackson.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1989