Description: Compilation of footage on the Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School. Press conference with Mr. Rollins and other people concerned about racist education at the King School, talking about the first day of school, the Boston School Committee's actions, and appropriate learning resources for the students at the King School. Another press conference about Operation Exodus, which is setting up learning centers for students who are assigned to attend the King School. They criticize the racist education of the current curriculum in Boston Schools. Cutaways of reporter asking questions. Press conference with John Bradley, new principal of the King School, answering questions about school problems and his proposed solutions. Interview with Louis Vangel, executive director of the Boston Teachers Union, on the teachers position at the King School. Interview with another man about the School Committee meeting to occur next Monday on the fate of the teachers and reopening of the King School. Interview with Louise Day Hicks on her proposed repeal of the 1965 Racial Imbalance law. Reporter asks her about soon to be Massachusetts Commissioner of Education Neil Sullivan and his busing programs. People walking into a building. Another interview with Mr. Vangel on the BTU's demands for the closing of the King School. Interview with man from the Boston School Committee on relationship between the School Committee and the King-Timility Advisory Council on resolving the problems at the King School. Silent footage of a hearing. Cutaways from Louise Day Hicks interview.
Collection: WHDH
Date Created: 11/1968...12/1968
Description: Anti-busing rally at St. Margaret's School. Interview with clergyman on his objections to busing, which are based on the dangers of transporting the children, not the schools they are assigned to. Louise Day Hicks attends the rally.
Collection: WHDH
Date Created: 09/12/1971
Description: A compilation of three Evening Compass shows from 1974-75. Evening Compass newscast from September 12, 1974. Paul deGive reports on the first day of school at the Rochambeau Elementary School. He reports that some parents, including Barbara King (local resident), are keeping their children out of school for fear of violence. Judy Stoia reports on the peaceful opening of the Martin Luther King School. Greg Pilkington and Diane Dumanoski report on their experiences riding buses with students to and from South Boston High School and Hyde Park High School. The bus Pilkington rode on was stoned in South Boston. Pilkington and Dumanoski report on the reactions of students. Joe Klein reports on the first day of school for a Hyde Park student, bused to the Lewenberg School in Mattapan. Klein reports that the student says that he will return to school tomorrow. Evening Compass newscast from December 12, 1974. Stoia reports on a violent mob gathered outside South Boston High School after the stabbing of a white student by an African American student. Stoia reports on clashes between the crowd and police. Pilkington reports from the Bayside Mall, where African American students arrived on buses after being trapped for several hours in South Boston High School. The students and their parents are angry and frightened. Peggy Murrell reports on the reactions of Thomas Atkins (President, NAACP) and Mel King (State Representative) to the violence at South Boston High School. Murrell reports that Atkins and King say that schools should be shut down if the safety of African American students cannot be guaranteed. Pam Bullard reports that the plaintiffs in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan) will demand that the federal court increase safety measures for African American students in South Boston. She also reports on a pending deadline for the Boston School Committee to file a school desegregation plan for 1975. Bullard notes that the School Committee risks being held in contempt of court if it does not file a plan. Evening Compass special from March 14, 1975. Pam Bullard reviews the major events concerning the desegregation of Boston schools in 1974. Her report includes footage and still photos of key figures and events in the busing crisis. Judy Stoia reports on an alternative school in Hyde Park, created by white parents to avoid busing, and on an alternative school for African American students. White parents at the alternative school in Hyde Park say that African American students are welcome to attend their school. Baumeister reports on Raymond Flynn, the only mayoral candidate to campaign on an antibusing platform. Baumeister also analyzes busing coverage by The Boston Globe and The Boston Herald American. Bullard reports on the school desegregation plan for the 1975-76 school year. Her report includes comments by Peter Ingeneri (Area Superintendent, Dearborn District) and Isaac Graves (Manager, Roxbury Little City Hall. She reports on segregation among Boston school faculty and administrators, and on plans to integrate school faculty in 1975. End credits reflect personnel working on all Evening Compass shows for the weeks of December 12, 1974 and March 14, 1975. Produced and directed by Charles C. Stuart.
0:00:15: Ed Baumeister introduces Paul deGive's report on the first day of school at the Rochambeau Elementary School in Dorchester. DeGive reports that the opening was peaceful; that a rumored white boycott failed to materialize; that buses were empty; that the absentee rate was 50% for both white and African American students. Degive comments that many parents were present at the opening. DeGive reports on an interview with Barbara King (local resident) who was present to observe the opening but did not send her daughter to the school for fear of violence. The nearby Murphy school also opened without incident. The attendance rate at the Murphy was estimated at two-thirds. 0:02:50: Baumeister introduces Judy Stoia's report on the Martin Luther King School. Stoia reports on the peaceful opening of the Martin Luther King School, which had been an African American school the previous year: the attendance rate was 50%; 130 white students attended, out of a possible 634; many parents kept their children at home because the King school was expected to be a trouble spot. 0:04:25: Baumeister talks to reporters Greg Pilkington and Diane Dumanoski. Pilkington spent the day with African American students who were bused into South Boston. Pilkington describes the students' reactions to their arrival at South Boston High School and their departure on buses which were stoned by an angry crowd. Diane Dumanoski describes a peaceful bus ride to Hyde Park High School with just one white student on the bus. Pilkington remarks on the low attendance at South Boston High School and describes the teachers as tense and ambivalent about busing. Dumanoski describes hostility from some white students at Hyde Park High School. 0:11:46: Baumeister reports on statistics: 47,000 students out of possible 70,000 attended Boston schools; police made 6 arrests; buses made 450 runs. Joe Klein reports on the first day of school for Jimmy Glavin, a Hyde Park student bused to the Lewenberg school in Mattapan. Visual: Report is a montage of still photographs. Shots of a photo of Claire O'Malley (bus monitor); of Glavin waiting for the bus; of Glavin on the bus. Klein reports that Glavin was the only student at the first stop; that the bus made several stops; that some parents refused to put their children on the bus. Klein reports that children of non-local parents in Coast Guard housing attended school. V: Shots of photographs of students and parents at various bus stops. Shots of photographs of students boarding the bus. Klein reports that the Lewenberg school was quiet; that the nearby Thompson School was quiet; that there were few white students in attendance at the Thompson School. Klein reports that the white students left the Lewenberg School on buses in the afternoon. Klein notes that Glavin says that he will return to school the next day. V: Shots of photographs of students in classrooms. Shots of photographs of students exiting the school and boarding buses; of Glavin exiting the bus. Baumeister ends the show. 0:16:17: Baumeister introduces the show. (Opening credits are cut.) Judy Stoia reports on violence at South Boston High School, where an African American student stabbed a white student. Stoia reports that an angry crowd of 1500 people had assembled outside of the high school by 1:00pm. Stoia reports that Louise Day Hicks (Boston City Council) tried to calm the crowd. V: Shots of photographs of huge crowds assembled on G Street, in front of the school; of helmeted police officers keeping the crowd at bay. Shot of a photograph of Hicks. Footage of Hicks assuring the crowd that the assault will be investigated. William Bulger (State Senator) stands beside Hicks. Hicks pleads with the crowd to let African American students return home safely. The crowd boos Hicks. Stoia reports that the crowd was hostile to police; that police units from the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF), the MDC Police Department and the Massachusetts State Police Department were outnumbered by the crowd; that the crowd threw bricks and bottles at police. Stoia reports that the crowd angrily stoned school buses headed toward the school. V: Shots of photographs of the huge crowd; of a TPF unit; of an MDC police officer on a motorcycle; of mounted police on the street. Shots of photographs of a police car with a broken window; of arrests being made. Shots of photographs of the crowd; of stoned school buses. Stoia reports that the buses were decoys and that African American students had escaped through a side door and were bused to safety. V: Shots of photographs of a side entrance of South Boston High School. 0:21:06: Pilkington reports on atmosphere at the Bayside Mall, where buses arrived with African American students who had been trapped in South Boston High School. Pilkington reports that students and parents were frightened and angry. V: Footage of buses and police officers in the mall parking lot. Angry groups of African American students speak directly to the camera about their experiences in South Boston. One student comments on the angry and violent parents in the South Boston crowd. An angry African American woman says that white children go to school peacefully at the McCormack school in her neighborhood, but that African American students cannot go safely to South Boston. She says that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is not doing his job. A man shouts into a bullhorn that there is no school on Thursday or Friday. Pilkington reports that the anger of the African American community seems to be directed at the city, the police, and the Boston School Committee for not controlling the situation in South Boston. 0:22:55: Peggy Murrell reports on the reaction of Thomas Atkins (President, NAACP) and Mel King (State Representative) to the violence at South Boston High School. She says that both leaders are determined to continue with school desegregation; that both are concerned for the safety of African American students in the schools. She quotes Atkins as saying that schools should be shut down and students should be reassigned if the safety of African American students cannot be guaranteed. Murrell reports that King agrees with Atkins about shutting down the schools if safety cannot be assured; that King says African American students will continue to attend school despite the violence. V: Shots of photographs of Atkins and of King. Murrell quotes King's condemnation of the violence at South Boston High School. Murell reports that Atkins charged the South Boston Home and School Association with holding a racist rally inside the high school and with encouraging a school boycott by white students. Murell says that Virginia Sheehy (South Boston Home and School Association) denies the charges. Murell reports that Sheehy says that white students should be able to hold meetings in school just like African American students do. State Senator William Owens (Chairman of the Emergency Committee Against Racism in Education) agrees that schools should be shut down if a peaceful solution cannot be found, and says that a march against racism planned for Saturday will proceed. 0:26:52: Pam Bullard reports on a special hearing before Judge Garrity planned for the next day: the African American plaintiffs in the desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan) have called the hearing to demand the following: the presence of state police and the national guard in South Boston; a ban on parents in schools; a ban on gatherings of more than five people in South Boston; a ban on the use of all racial epithets. Bullard reports that Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs) says that South Boston will not escape desegregation. Bullard notes that the Boston School Committee is under court order to file a second phase desegregation plan on the following Monday; that the new plan will desegregate schools city-wide and will allow parents to choose between flexible and traditional educational programs. V: Footage of John Coakley (Boston School Department) talking about the differences between the traditional and flexible program choices under the new plan. Coakley says that the new plan allows parents to choose programs, but not specific schools. Bullard reports that the Boston School Committee has repeatedly refused to endorse any form of desegregation; that the committee risks being held in contempt of court if they do not approve a plan to submit to the court. Bullard reports on speculation that William Leary (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) will submit the plan without the approval of the School Committee, to avoid being held in contempt of court. 0:31:56: Baumeister comments on the silence of both Mayor Kevin White and Governor Frank Sargent regarding the violence in South Boston. V: Footage of White on September 12, 1974, condemning violence and promising that it would not be tolerated. Credits roll. 0:34:14: Evening Compass special: The Compass Weekly: A Delicate Balance. Pam Bullard's report sums up the events concerning the desegregation of schools in Boston during the 1974 school year. V: Report includes footage of antibusing demonstrations at City Hall Plaza in August and September of 1974; of William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) reporting low attendance figures on September 13, 1974; of white students and black students discussing forced busing outside of Hyde Park High School; of a car on the street with two KKK signs displayed; of Kevin White addressing the busing issue on October 8, 1974; of Gerald Ford stating his opposition to forced busing on October 9, 1974; of national guardsmen on October 16, 1974; of students discussing their feelings about busing; of William Leary (Superintendent, Boston School Department) announcing the reopening of South Boston High School on January 7, 1974. Report also includes footage of children in classrooms, antibusing protests, school buses escorted by police, police in South Boston, and still photos of important figures in the busing controversy. 0:45:27: Stoia reports on alternative schools set up in Hyde Park by parents opposed to forced busing. Stoia reports that some teachers are accredited and are paid from the students' fees; that the curriculum is similar to public school curriculum and classes are smaller. V: Footage of a teacher and students in an alternative classroom. Footage of Henry Lodge (Hyde Park parent) being interviewed by Stoia. Lodge talks about the good education provided by the alternative schools; about parents' need to escape from forced busing and inferior public schools. Stoia reports that 125 white students attend alternative schools in Hyde Park and South Boston; that organizers plan to open Hyde Park Academy, which will have its own building to accommodate 500 students; that these schools are open to African Americans, but are mostly white. Stoia reports on an alternative school for African American students. V: Footage of African American teacher and students in an alternative classroom. Stoia reports that African American parents do not want to send their children into a hostile environment. Stoia remarks that parents are looking for "quality education," which is a term often heard in the desegregation debate. V: Footage of Thomas Atkins (President of the NAACP) calling on leaders to stop politicizing the school desegregation process. 0:49:22: Baumeister comments that many Boston residents are opposed to busing but that Raymond Flynn is the only mayoral candidate opposed to busing. Baumeister reports that Flynn campaigns on the busing issue and is the only antibusing politician to run for mayor. V: Shots of still photographs of candidates White, Thomas Eisenstadt, and Flynn. Shots of photographs of busing opponents Louise Day Hicks, William Bulger (State Senator), Avi Nelson (radio talk show host). Baumeister reports on media coverage of busing by The Boston Globe and The Boston Herald American. Baumeister reports that both papers urged compliance with the court order and played down any violence resulting from desegregation; that the Globe is especially distrusted by the antibusing movement; that antibusing leaders have set up their own information centers; that television stations have largely escaped the anti-media feeling of the anti-busers; that a large media presence will exacerbate the tense situation. V: Shots of front-page busing coverage in The Boston Globe and The Boston Herald American. Footage of William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) on September 15, 1974. Reid tells the media to stop filming and photographing his students. 0:54:15: Bullard reports on the peaceful integration of some schools and on the next phase of school desegregation in Boston, which will include schools in Charlestown, East Boston, and Roxbury. V: Footage of Peter Ingeneri (Area Superintendent, Dearborn District) on November 21, 1974. Ingeneri talks about larger social problems which will make school desegregation difficult in Roxbury. Footage of Isaac Graves (Manager, Roxbury Little City Hall) on January 9, 1975. Graves talks about African American commitment to better schools and integration. Footage of Chris Mitchell (student) on January 9, 1975. Mitchell talks about how important it is to graduate from high school. Report also includes footage of students boarding buses; of students in integrated classrooms; of African American schoolchildren; of buses transporting schoolchildren. Bullard reports on a Supreme Court ruling which dealt a blow to the antibusing movement's plan to include the suburbs in desegregation. Bullard reads statistics regarding the segregation of Boston school teachers and administrators. She reports on the plan to integrate teachers and administrators and to hire more African Americans in the school system. Bullard reports on the budget for police and security required to desegregate Boston's schools; on expectations for more resistance to busing in the next school year; on efforts to reverse or stop the court order. V: Credits roll over footage of African American students boarding buses.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/12/1974
Description: Theodore Landsmark (attorney) speaks to the media at a press conference. His face is in bandages. Landsmark gives an account of the attack he sustained on City Hall Plaza, perpetrated by white teenagers attending an anti-busing rally. He commends the actions of Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston), who came to his aid after the attack. Landsmark talks about the media's coverage of his attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of his attackers, and adds that he will bring suit against members of the Boston School Committee and the Boston City Council. He condemns white city leaders who "incite and encourage" racist violence. Landsmark calls for an end to racism and race discrimination in the city. He accuses the white power structure of ignoring the problems of minority citizens.
1:00:04: Visual: A group of African American men greet each other at the entrance of the room where Theodore Landsmark (attorney) will hold a press conference. Landsmark enters the room. His nose and face are bandaged with white tape. An African American woman hands him a note as he enters. Landsmark sits down behind a table with microphones. An African American man sits beside him. A group of African American men and women, and a few white people, stand behind him as he speaks. Reporters sit at the other side of the table and stand around the room. The reporters take notes as Landsmark speaks. 1:02:00: V: Landsmark notes that there has been conflict among the media over coverage of the press conference; that he wants both union and non-union members of the media to cover the press conference; that the media needs to work out the union issues outside of the press conference. Landsmark greets the media and reads a statement. He says that the press conference will be brief because he needs to get some rest; that he lost a lot of blood in the attack. Landsmark says that he is concerned that the publicity generated by the attack may distort some of the crucial issues which need to be discussed. Landsmark runs through the sequence of events on the day of the attack. Landsmark says that he was on his way to an affirmative action committee meeting with the Boston Redevelopment Authority; that he was beaten and kicked by a crowd of young people coming from an anti-busing rally at City Hall. Landsmark refutes rumors that Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston) had been with him and ran away from the scene. Landsmark says that he regrets the circulation of the false reports regarding Jones; that Jones was the only person who left City Hall to aid him after the attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of the youth involved in the attack; that he will take action in civil and criminal court against members of the Boston City Council and the Boston School Committee; that he would like to see an end to the use of City Hall as "a sanctuary for racism and a resource center for those who would incite and encourage racist violence." Landsmark says that some city officials perpetuate discrimination against people of color in Boston on a daily basis. Landsmark expresses gratitude to members of the African American and white communities for the many acts of kindness and courage shown to him after the attack. Landsmark adds that meaningful gestures by the white community before the attack could have prevented the violence. Landsmark says that he is grateful for the support of the Black Caucus, the Board of Directors of the Contractors Association of Boston, and the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. Landsmark thanks the newspaper and TV cameramen for capturing the attack on film. He says that he wishes that somebody had come to his aid, but is grateful for the record of the attack provided by the journalists. Landsmark says that without the photos, the attack would have been recorded "as just another scuffle on the street." Landsmark says that racism is to blame for the attack; that racism in the city of Boston has been fueled by selfish politicians; that politicians continue to ignore the social and economic problems of the city. Landsmark says that he will work to solve these problems in the African American community; that solving these problems will benefit all citizens. Landsmark says that the attack lays bare the problems of the city; that the problems go beyond issues of safety in the street or busing. Landsmark notes that the attack has been called "an isolated incident" by J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General). Landsmark says that he does not agree; that people of color must be allowed to participate on an equal basis in all areas and levels of business and city government. Landsmark says that the issue of racism must not be subordinated; that the white power structure is indifferent to people of color in the city; that businesses and government must work together to improve the economic situation of people of color in Boston. 1:15:29: V: Reporters ask Landsmark questions after his statement. A reporter asks him to specify city officials against whom he will bring suit. Landsmark says that he will not name the officials because he does not want to jeopardize any of the lawsuits. A reporter asks him if he will bring suit against Louise Day Hicks (Boston City Council). Landsmark says that he will not comment except that his attackers were violating truancy laws; that his attackers were marching on City Hall Plaza without a parade permit. Landsmark notes that Hicks invited the protestors into her office to escape from the cold; that police officers were on duty near City Hall Plaza, but did not arrive on the scene until after the attack. Landsmark says that he cannot comment on how the police department should have deployed its personnel to control the unlicensed protest on City Hall Plaza by the students. A reporter asks Landsmark if he agrees with the Black Caucus' decision to call for the resignation of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston). Landsmark says that the Black Caucus is looking for better leadership from White on issues of affirmative action, busing, and unemployment. Landsmark says that he has received calls from around the country; that many are appalled by the incident on City Hall Plaza; that the city can take action to prevent more violent incidents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/07/1976
Description: Steve Curwood interviews Louise Day Hicks about her vote in favor of a curfew proposal for the city of Boston. Hicks thinks that the curfew could reduce unrest on the streets in the evenings. She says that she will vote to rescind the curfew if police are shown to use it as a means to harass residents. Hicks notes that the senior citizens and fire fighters support the curfew proposal. They shoot cutaways.
0:58:32: Visual: Steve Curwood interviews Louis Day Hicks in her office. Curwood asks Hicks why she is in favor of a curfew proposal for Boston. Hicks says that senior citizens and fire fighters have requested the curfew; that a curfew could mean greater safety in the evening. Curwood comments that police have called the curfew proposal unenforceable. Hicks says that the city should try the curfew to test its effectiveness; that she voted for it to show solidarity with the senior citizens and fire fighters. Curwood points out the expense involved in a curfew ordinance; that the county may have to pay for private lawyers to defend violators because of the heavy workload of the public defenders. Hicks says that the curfew does not place undue burden on minors, who can move about with a note from their parents; that the curfew can be rescinded if it proves to be unworkable. Hicks says that the curfew could be enforced arbitrarily as a means of harassment; that she will vote to rescind the curfew if this proves to be true. Hicks says that the law could be used to bolster parental authority; that she hopes most parents have authority over their children even without the curfew. Hicks says that she does not know if the mayor will veto the curfew. Curwood thanks Hicks. The crew takes cutaway shots of Curwood and Hicks. Curwood and Hicks speak informally. Hicks talks about her constituents' support for the curfew.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1976
Description: Sound dropout in the beginning of the video. Boston City Council meeting on the Boston School budget. City Councilor reads communications from Mayor White to the City Council. Boston schools superintendent Marion Fahey testifies to City Council about school budget deficit. Accompanying Fahey are Paul Kennedy, Associate Superintendant in charge of personnel and John McGran, member of the superintendent's office on budgetary matters. Councilors Louise Day Hicks, Albert "Dapper" O'Neil, Larry DiCara are among those on the panel questioning Fahey. Mayor White and Superintendent Fahey both address the effect of Judge Arthur Garrity's 1975 court order on the Boston School Department budget. Video goes black in the middle for a few second, but audio continues.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1976
Description: Reporter Christopher Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration of Ray Flynn as Mayor of Boston, in the Wang Center. The crowd cheers as Flynn and former mayor Kevin White pass by. Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration in the lobby of the Wang Center. Interviewees express concerns about unemployment, crime, the restoration of city services and the city budget. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that she appreciates Flynn's commitment to diversity and unity but is suspicious of his past voting record on racial issues. Lydon interviews people outside of the Wang Center. Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority) says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech, but will face difficulties in delivering city services and achieving racial harmony. George Keverian (State Representative) says that Flynn is the right person to unite the city. Louise Day Hicks (former member of the Boston City Council) says that Flynn must strike a balance between downtown concerns and neighborhood interests. Hicks says that South Boston is the "center of the city." Hicks speaks to Dapper O'Neil outside of the Wang Center. Felix Arroyo (Latino activist) hopes that Flynn will deliver on his promises; Arroyo believes that it will be difficult for Flynn to integrate the city's neighborhoods. Elma Lewis (African American activist) says that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis adds that she is "always looking for diversity." Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Flynn exits the Wang Center and gets in his station wagon; crowd cheers. Lydon interviews James Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly expresses reservations about Flynn's proposal for District Advisory Councils. Thomas Menino (Boston City Council) compliments Flynn's inaugural speech.
1:00:00: Visual: Christopher Lydon interviews a white male about the inaugural speech of Ray Flynn (Mayor, City of Boston) at the Wang Center for the Performing Arts. The man says that Flynn gave a strong speech; that he is optimistic about Flynn's administration. The man says that Flynn will face challenges in improving the schools. Lydon speaks informally to the man. 1:00:45: V: Uniformed officers march up the stairs in the lobby of the Wang Center. People are gathered in the lobby. The audience cheers as Flynn exits a room and proceeds up the stairs. Flynn's young daughter holds his hand as he walks up the stairs. Flynn stops to greet bystanders as he passes. Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and Kathryn White (wife of Kevin White) proceed up the stairs after Flynn. 1:02:12: V: Lydon interviews a white man who is a Dorchester resident. The man says that Flynn is the first mayor since Josiah Quincy to have a "sense of the city"; that Flynn is familiar with the neighborhoods and the downtown. Lydon interviews a white middle-aged man about Flynn's speech. The man says that Flynn's speech was very good; that Flynn understands that the government exists to serve the people. The man says that Flynn will face a challenge in restoring city services during an economic crisis. An older white woman says that Flynn's speech was "wonderful." The woman says that Flynn will face a challenge in reducing unemployment; that Flynn's emphasis on unity was important. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that Flynn's speech was good; that she hesitates to trust Flynn because of his past voting record on racial issues. Silveira says that it will be difficult for Flynn to give his full attention to Boston neighborhoods; that she appreciates his commitment to diversity and unity. An older Irish woman recognizes Lydon from television. Her companions explains that they are from the region of Ireland where Flynn's family is from. The second Irish woman says that the speech was "wonderful." An older white woman says that Flynn will be a good mayor if he delivers what he promised in the speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to reduce the crime rate. An older white man says that Flynn has the right idea; that Flynn will "economize." 1:06:59: V: A crowd streams out of the doors of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority). Spence says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to deliver services and to achieve racial harmony. Spence says that Flynn's speech expressed his decency and commitment to the people. The crowd continues to exit the building. Groups of people are gathered outside of the doors. Members of the crowd greet Lydon. George Keverian (Massachusetts House of Representatives) greets Lydon and his two daughters. Keverian says that Flynn delivered a good speech; that Flynn's humanity was in evidence. Keverian says that Flynn is the right person to unite the people of Boston. Keverian continues to speak informally to Lydon and his daughters. 1:12:07: V: Louise Day Hicks greets Lydon. Hicks says that Flynn's speech covered many "interesting" and important topics; that South Boston is the "center" of the city. Hicks says that Flynn will need to strike a balance between the neighborhoods and the downtown interests; that Flynn needs to concentrate on affordable housing and crime reduction. Hicks confers with Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) on the street outside of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Felix Arroyo (Latino activist). Arroyo says that the city will be a better place if Flynn can deliver on his promises. Arroyo says that Flynn will face challenges in integrating the neighborhoods; that he appreciates Flynn's commitment to education. Shot of a black car pulled up to the curb in front of the Wang Center. Lydon asks Elma Lewis (African American activist) about Flynn's speech. Lewis say that Flynn put on a good "show"; that inaugural speeches do not mean much; that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis says that she has attended inaugurals for many years; that she would like to have seen "more diversity"; that she is "always looking for more diversity." 1:17:04: V: Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Crawford says that Flynn will face challenges in eliminating racial discrimination. Flynn exits the Wang Center. He greets several groups of bystanders. Photographers crowd around Flynn's station wagon. Flynn clears snow from his windshield. Flynn gets in the car and drives away. The crowd cheers briefly. 1:20:37: V: Lydon interviews Jim Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly says that Flynn gave a good speech; that parts of the speech "concerned" him. Kelly expresses reservations about the District Advisory Councils. Kelly says that Flynn face difficulties in providing services to the city during an economic crisis. Kelly says that the people of South Boston are happy to "have a say" in how the city is run. Lydon begins to interview Thomas Menino (Boston City Council). Menino says that Flynn made an excellent speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/02/1984