Description: Ray Flynn comments on the Doyle-Flynn Bill, which cut state funding for abortions, and was being presented to the legislature the following day. According to the Original WCVB Rundown, Flynn called this impromptu news conference on the steps of the State House to defend his bill. Mix of sound and silent.
Collection: WCVB Collection
Date Created: 09/18/1977
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Mayor Ray Flynn has promised to integrate public housing projects in South Boston and to put a stop to discriminatory practices by the Boston Housing Authority (BHA). African American families have been passed over on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston housing projects. Flynn's plans to integrate public housing have angered his constituents in South Boston, who refer to housing integration as "forced housing." Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of white residents of a South Boston housing project and by footage of South Boston residents during the busing crisis in 1974. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and Doris Bunte of the BHA attended a community meeting in South Boston to talk about housing integration with South Boston residents. Flynn defends himself against the hostile comments of South Boston residents. City Councilor James Kelly addresses the meeting, denouncing housing integration. Interview with Neil Sullivan, policy advisor to Flynn who talks about public housing integration and Flynn's relationship with South Boston residents.
1:00:02: Visual: Shot of a white woman standing at the entrance to a housing project building in South Boston. Audio of Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Mayor Ray Flynn) saying that the people of South Boston understand discrimination. Meg Vaillancourt reports that residents of South Boston may understand discrimination; that some residents of South Boston also practice discrimination. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) discriminates against African American families; that no African American families live in any of the three public housing projects in South Boston. V: Shots of a white woman looking out of a window of an apartment in a housing project; of the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston; of a sign reading, "Old Colony Public Housing Development." Shots of white project residents outside of a project building. Vaillancourt reports that African American families were passed over on the waiting list for project apartments in South Boston; that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has promised to integrate the public housing projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn met with angry South Boston residents at a community meeting yesterday evening. V: Footage of Flynn addressing the crowd at the community meeting. South Boston residents are crowded into the room, seated at long tables. Doris Bunte (BHA) is on stage with Flynn. Flynn says that the issue is fair and equal access to public housing. Shot of a bumper sticker reading, "Stop 'forced' housing." Vaillancourt reports that the slogan, "Stop forced housing" evokes memories of the anti-busing protests in South Boston in the 1970s. V: Footage of school buses pulling up to South Boston High School in September of 1973. Angry South Boston residents yell and jeer at the buses. Vaillancourt reports that South Boston residents are angry about the integration of the area's three public housing projects. V: Shot of a white woman in the audience making an angry remark. Footage of James Kelly (Boston City Council) addressing the crowd. Kelly says that South Boston residents are going to be denied the right to live in public housing in their own neighborhood. Members of the crowd stand and cheer. Meg Vaillancourt reports that the controversy surrounding the integration of public housing projects creates an identity crisis for Flynn; that Flynn is in disagreement with his South Boston neighbors. V: Shot of Flynn walking to the stage at the community meeting. The crowd yells and boos Flynn. Vaillancourt notes that an audience member asked Flynn when he was moving to Roxbury. V: Shots of white female audience member standing to address Flynn; of another audience member raising her hand. Footage of Flynn saying that he and his family were born and raised in South Boston. The audience jeers. Footage of Sullivan saying that Flynn was probably hurt by the attitude of South Boston residents last night; that Flynn has never ducked this sort of confrontation. Sullivan says that Flynn could have refused to go to the meeting. Vaillancourt reports that Sullivan said that the public housing projects in South Boston could begin to be integrated by April. Vaillancourt notes that no whites will be forced to move out of the projects in order to achieve integration. V: Shot of an African American man raking leaves outside of a project building; of a white female project resident speaking to a reporter. Shots of a public housing project in South Boston; of Flynn at the community meeting; of Bunte addressing the community meeting. Footage of Flynn saying that no person will be displaced to serve the purposes of integration. Footage of Sullivan being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Sullivan says that the average Boston housing development has a turnover rate of 10% each year; that 10% is a higher turnover rate than most neighborhoods. Sullivan says that the goal of the Flynn administration is to sustain a good quality of life in the public housing projects. Shots of a white woman and white children in front of a project building; of a young white boy running around outside of a project building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/13/1988
Description: Mayor Ray Flynn holds a press conference in Roxbury to unveil plans for a new housing and commercial development to be built on a vacant lot in Douglass Square. The Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) cleared the land in the 1960s and never rebuilt on the lot. The owners and developers of the new project are African American. Flynn and City Councilor Bruce Bolling talk about the new development. Flynn says that all neighborhoods and all residents must share in the growth of the city. Bolling says that the proposal for the creation of Mandela, Massachusetts is a no longer an issue. Bolling and other Mandela opponents believe that the new development signifies a renewed commitment to the Roxbury neighborhood by the city of Boston.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) at an outdoor gathering in Roxbury. Flynn stands under a tent, addressing a crowd. Flynn talks about the vote against the proposal for the creation of Mandela, Massachusetts. Flynn says that the vote shows that the racial polarization of the city is in the past. Shot of the gathering from the back of the tent; of an architectural model. David Boeri reports that Flynn is advocating affordable housing and economic opportunity in every neighborhood. Boeri notes that Flynn unveiled a plan for a project in Douglass Square; that the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) cleared a two-acre plot of land in Douglass Square in the 1960s; that the lot has been abandoned since then. V: Shot of a mural on the wall of a building in Douglass Square in Roxbury; of buildings in Douglass Square; of a vacant lot in Douglass Square; of architectural plans and an architectural model. Boeri reports that a housing and commercial complex is slated to be built on the vacant lot; that one-quarter of the units will be set aside for low-income housing. V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) saying that the project addresses the need for economic re-investment in Roxbury. Boeri reports that the developers and owners of the project will be African American; that Bolling noted that Roxbury is becoming a full and equal partner in the city of Boston. V: Shots of African American crowd members; of an African American man standing beside an architectural drawing of the project. Footage of Bolling saying that the incorporation of minority neighborhoods into a new city is a dead issue. Boeri reports that Flynn had a unity breakfast with Roxbury leaders this morning; that Flynn pledged to make the city of opportunity for all. V: Shots of the crowd at the gathering. Footage of Flynn saying that all residents need to share in the city's growth and prosperity; that development of the downtown must be accompanied by development of the neighborhoods. Boeri stands in the vacant lot in Douglass Square. Boeri says that the lot has represented an empty promise by the city of Boston to the people of Roxbury. Boeri says that Bolling and other leaders fought the idea of secession from the city. Boeri adds that these leaders say that the plans for the new project are a signal that "their time has come."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/05/1986
Description: Interviews with women school integration policy. A group tried to get Massachusetts legislators to tour Boston's schools, but only one Representative showed up. Women talk with the Representative. Ray Flynn in State House corridor. Woman discusses schools having specialized programs to attract students based on interest. Sound.
Collection: WCVB Collection
Date Created: 05/10/1974
Description: Mayoral candidates Mel King and Ray Flynn participate in a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. Flynn talks about his experience in government and his commitment to the public schools. He notes his familiarity with the city and school budgets, and he discusses the importance of public education and public housing. King stresses the importance of early childhood education programs and a "child-centered" school system. King speaks of the need for the mayor to work together with the Boston School Committee. King says that the city must continue to demonstrate its support of integrated schools. King and Flynn respond to a question about requiring students to pass a standardized test in order to graduate. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:05: Visual: Four members of the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) sit at a table on stage at English High School. A member of the CWEC welcomes mayoral candidates Ray Flynn and Mel King to the annual meeting of the CWEC. Flynn and King are seated at a table at the center of the stage. Shots of Flynn and King. The CWEC member says that the candidates and the audience will discuss the future of public education in Boston. 1:01:55: V: Flynn thanks the moderator and the CWEC. Flynn mentions his experience as a state legislator and a member of the Boston City Council. He says that he was a student in the Boston Public Schools. Flynn congratulates the CWEC for their commitment ot public education. Flynn stresses the importance of public education and a good school system. Flynn says that he has a Master's Degree in education from Harvard; that he is committed to education. Flynn says that he would visit a few public schools and a few public housing projects on his first day as mayor; that education and public housing will be major concerns for his administration. Flynn says that the mayor should be involved in public education; that politicians in Boston have distanced themselves from the public schools since desegregation. Flynn says that the mayor should serve as an ex-officio member of the Boston School Committee; that the mayor needs to be aware of the situation in the schools. Flynn says that he is familiar with the city and school budgets. Flynn says that fiscal stability and predictable student placements are important for the schools. The audience applauds. 1:07:56: V: King thanks the audience and the CWEC. King says that the students in the school system must be served from birth to graduation; that early childhood education programs are important. King says that resources must be allocated to support Head Start programs and other early childhood education programs. King says that "child-centered" school system must guarantee education for all students; that the school system must believe that all children can be educated. King says that the mayor must work with the Boston School Committee; that the members of the School Committee will be newly elected; that the mayor and the Boston School Committee must determine the problems and the needs of the school system. King says that the newly elected School Committee must be unified in support of integrated schools. Jump cut in videotape. King says that he would provide leadership on the issue of education; that he would work to create a good climate and to end divisiveness on the issue of education. King says that the Boston Public School System must demonstrate its commitment to integrated education. The audience applauds. 1:14:52: V: An audience member asks if students should pass a standardized test in order to graduate from high school. King says that standards need to be established in the early grades as well as upon graduation. King says that the school administration must be held responsible for the education of the students; that diagnostic testing and evaluation is needed at every grade level, not just upon graduation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/13/1983
Description: Mayoral candidates Ray Flynn and Mel King participate in a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. Flynn says that students graduating from Boston public schools must be prepared to compete in the workplace. He adds that there must be a working relationship between parents, teachers, administrators, and the community. King speaks about the workings of the school administration and advocates the inclusion of parents in the process. King and Flynn respond to questions about how they would have handled school desegregation if they had been mayor at the time. Both candidates answer questions about the role of the mayor upon the court's withdrawal from its supervisory role over the school system and about the school budget. Audience members include John O'Bryant of the Boston School Committee. Tape 2 of 2.
1:00:00: Visual: Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston) speaks at a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. The candidates' forum is held in conjuction with their annual meeting. Flynn says that students graduating from Boston public schools must be able to compete in the workplace. Long shot of candidates on stage from the back of the auditorium. Flynn says that there must be a working relationship between parents, teachers, administrators and the community. The audience applauds. 1:00:56: V: King speaks about the workings of the school administration. Jump cut in the videotape. Shots of John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee); of members of the audience. King says that parents must be included in the workings of the school system. Shot of the candidates on stage. An audience member asks what each candidate would have done about school desegregation if he had been mayor at the time. The audience member also asks about the role of the mayor when the court pulls withdraws from its supervisory role over the school system. King says that community control over schools is important; that community accountablility is an important aspect of community control; that members of the community must be held accountable for the state of neighborhood schools. King says that he had suggested a community approach to schools which could have prevented the kind of sweeping court order imposed by the federal court to accomplish school desegregation. King says that he would have tried to bring people together in support of school desegregation if he had been mayor at the time; that there were many people acting in opposition to the court order at the time of school desegregation. King says that he would provide leadership on the issue of quality, integrated education upon the withdrawal of the court. 1:05:08: V: Flynn responds to the same question about school desegregation. Flynn notes that the State Department of Education will continue to oversee the Boston Public School System after the withdrawal of the court. Flynn says that he will work with the State Department of Education to protect the Constitutional rights of public schoolchildren in Boston. Flynn says that political and moral leadership was absent during school desegregation in Boston. Flynn says that he would have defended the rights and the safety of Boston schoolchildren as mayor, even if he disagreed with the court order. Flynn notes that he was a state legislator at the time of school desegregation; that he was criticized at the time for standing up for his beliefs; that he was criticized for living in a certain community; that he acted responsibly on behalf of all of Boston's schoolchildren at the time. 1:07:15: V: An audience member asks about the school budget. Flynn says that it is important to educate children; that it is more expensive to remedy social problems resulting from poor education. Flynn says that he supported funding for Boston schools even when it was politically unpopular to do so; that he is committed to providing the necessary funds to assure a good school system. Flynn says that accountability is as important as funding; that the school system has too many administrators. King responds to the same question. King says that he is aware of the lack of resources available to teachers and students in the Boston Public School System; that the lack of resources is embarrassing for a school system with a large budget; that the school administrators must make a commitment to provide resources for students and teachers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/13/1983
Description: Reporter Christopher Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration of Ray Flynn as Mayor of Boston, in the Wang Center. The crowd cheers as Flynn and former mayor Kevin White pass by. Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration in the lobby of the Wang Center. Interviewees express concerns about unemployment, crime, the restoration of city services and the city budget. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that she appreciates Flynn's commitment to diversity and unity but is suspicious of his past voting record on racial issues. Lydon interviews people outside of the Wang Center. Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority) says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech, but will face difficulties in delivering city services and achieving racial harmony. George Keverian (State Representative) says that Flynn is the right person to unite the city. Louise Day Hicks (former member of the Boston City Council) says that Flynn must strike a balance between downtown concerns and neighborhood interests. Hicks says that South Boston is the "center of the city." Hicks speaks to Dapper O'Neil outside of the Wang Center. Felix Arroyo (Latino activist) hopes that Flynn will deliver on his promises; Arroyo believes that it will be difficult for Flynn to integrate the city's neighborhoods. Elma Lewis (African American activist) says that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis adds that she is "always looking for diversity." Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Flynn exits the Wang Center and gets in his station wagon; crowd cheers. Lydon interviews James Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly expresses reservations about Flynn's proposal for District Advisory Councils. Thomas Menino (Boston City Council) compliments Flynn's inaugural speech.
1:00:00: Visual: Christopher Lydon interviews a white male about the inaugural speech of Ray Flynn (Mayor, City of Boston) at the Wang Center for the Performing Arts. The man says that Flynn gave a strong speech; that he is optimistic about Flynn's administration. The man says that Flynn will face challenges in improving the schools. Lydon speaks informally to the man. 1:00:45: V: Uniformed officers march up the stairs in the lobby of the Wang Center. People are gathered in the lobby. The audience cheers as Flynn exits a room and proceeds up the stairs. Flynn's young daughter holds his hand as he walks up the stairs. Flynn stops to greet bystanders as he passes. Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and Kathryn White (wife of Kevin White) proceed up the stairs after Flynn. 1:02:12: V: Lydon interviews a white man who is a Dorchester resident. The man says that Flynn is the first mayor since Josiah Quincy to have a "sense of the city"; that Flynn is familiar with the neighborhoods and the downtown. Lydon interviews a white middle-aged man about Flynn's speech. The man says that Flynn's speech was very good; that Flynn understands that the government exists to serve the people. The man says that Flynn will face a challenge in restoring city services during an economic crisis. An older white woman says that Flynn's speech was "wonderful." The woman says that Flynn will face a challenge in reducing unemployment; that Flynn's emphasis on unity was important. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that Flynn's speech was good; that she hesitates to trust Flynn because of his past voting record on racial issues. Silveira says that it will be difficult for Flynn to give his full attention to Boston neighborhoods; that she appreciates his commitment to diversity and unity. An older Irish woman recognizes Lydon from television. Her companions explains that they are from the region of Ireland where Flynn's family is from. The second Irish woman says that the speech was "wonderful." An older white woman says that Flynn will be a good mayor if he delivers what he promised in the speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to reduce the crime rate. An older white man says that Flynn has the right idea; that Flynn will "economize." 1:06:59: V: A crowd streams out of the doors of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority). Spence says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to deliver services and to achieve racial harmony. Spence says that Flynn's speech expressed his decency and commitment to the people. The crowd continues to exit the building. Groups of people are gathered outside of the doors. Members of the crowd greet Lydon. George Keverian (Massachusetts House of Representatives) greets Lydon and his two daughters. Keverian says that Flynn delivered a good speech; that Flynn's humanity was in evidence. Keverian says that Flynn is the right person to unite the people of Boston. Keverian continues to speak informally to Lydon and his daughters. 1:12:07: V: Louise Day Hicks greets Lydon. Hicks says that Flynn's speech covered many "interesting" and important topics; that South Boston is the "center" of the city. Hicks says that Flynn will need to strike a balance between the neighborhoods and the downtown interests; that Flynn needs to concentrate on affordable housing and crime reduction. Hicks confers with Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) on the street outside of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Felix Arroyo (Latino activist). Arroyo says that the city will be a better place if Flynn can deliver on his promises. Arroyo says that Flynn will face challenges in integrating the neighborhoods; that he appreciates Flynn's commitment to education. Shot of a black car pulled up to the curb in front of the Wang Center. Lydon asks Elma Lewis (African American activist) about Flynn's speech. Lewis say that Flynn put on a good "show"; that inaugural speeches do not mean much; that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis says that she has attended inaugurals for many years; that she would like to have seen "more diversity"; that she is "always looking for more diversity." 1:17:04: V: Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Crawford says that Flynn will face challenges in eliminating racial discrimination. Flynn exits the Wang Center. He greets several groups of bystanders. Photographers crowd around Flynn's station wagon. Flynn clears snow from his windshield. Flynn gets in the car and drives away. The crowd cheers briefly. 1:20:37: V: Lydon interviews Jim Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly says that Flynn gave a good speech; that parts of the speech "concerned" him. Kelly expresses reservations about the District Advisory Councils. Kelly says that Flynn face difficulties in providing services to the city during an economic crisis. Kelly says that the people of South Boston are happy to "have a say" in how the city is run. Lydon begins to interview Thomas Menino (Boston City Council). Menino says that Flynn made an excellent speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/02/1984
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on controversy over a new student assignment plan for the Boston Public Schools, which minority members of the Boston School Committee spoke out against at a breakfast commemorating the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.. School Committee members John O'Bryant, Juanita Wade, Jean McGuire, and Gerald Anderson speak to the media. They do not believe that the plan will provide equitable education for all. The plan was proposed by mayor Ray Flynn. It will allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend. Interview with Flynn, who defends the proposal, saying that it's supported by parents. He adds that School Committee members have been asked for input on the plan. Vaillancourt also reports that Flynn has proposed the decentralization of the Boston School Department and selling off the headquarters of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt reports that minority members of the School Committee may rescind their support for superintendent Laval Wilson if he supports Flynn's school choice proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Elma Lewis in Marsh Chapel at Boston University on Martin Luther King Day and Carmen Fields interviews Robert Nemiroff about the playwright Lorraine Hansberry
1:00:26: Visual: Footage of city and state leaders including Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), Bernard Cardinal Law (Archidiocese of Boston), and Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) singing together at celebration in honor of the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Meg Vaillancourt reports that local leaders gathered over breakfast today to celebrate Martin Luther King's birthday. Vaillancourt notes that there was controversy at the breakfast over a new assignment plan for students in Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of Juanita Wade (Boston School Committee) speaking to the media. School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire sit beside Wade. Wade calls the new plan "segregation redux." Wade says that the Boston Public Schools need to provide choice, equity, and a quality education right now. Footage of Flynn speaking to the media. Flynn says that the plan has the support of the citizens of Boston; that parents are looking for this kind of reform. Vaillancourt reports that the new plan would allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend; that parents have not been able to choose schools since school desegregation began in 1974. V: Shots of buses pulling up to the front of South Boston High School in 1974; of South Boston residents jeering at the buses. Shots of buses parked in front of South Boston High School; of African American students walking among the buses. Vaillancourt notes that the population of white students in Boston Public Schools has declined since 1974; that non-white students make up 70% of the student population in Boston Public Schools. Vaillancourt adds that the School System has been criticized for not providing students with a quality education. V: Shots of non-white students in a classroom; of an African American male student sitting in a classroom. Shot of Flynn. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and two consultants have proposed a plan to improve the schools and to increase parental choice. V: Footage of School Committee members O'Bryant, Wade, McGuire, and Gerald Anderson sitting on a couch. African American community leaders, including Charles Yancey (Boston City Council), Eugene Rivers (African Peoples Pentecostal Church) and Louis Elisa (Boston chapter of the NAACP), stand behind them. Anderson addresses the media. Anderson says that the Boston School System needs to provide a quality education to all before it can claim to be equitable. Anderson says that the mayor needs to provide more funding to the schools. Shots of O'Bryant and other community leaders. Footage of Flynn being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Flynn if he is surprised by the attitude of the African American community leaders. Flynn says that he has been working on the proposal for several months; that community leaders have had many opportunities to review and give input on the proposal. Footage of Anderson saying that he is offended by Flynn's attitude. Anderson notes that Flynn has said that the statements of the African American leaders are "bogus." Anderson says that the community leaders are standing up for their constituents; that Flynn's statements are "bogus." Footage of Flynn saying that the members of the School Committee have had input on the proposal; that the members of the School Committee voted twelve-to-one in favor of the plan. Flynn says that the School Committee members were told that they would have further opportunities to give input on the proposal. Footage of McGuire saying that Flynn's proposal will cost more money. McGuire says that the School Committee has not been given additional money to fund Flynn's proposal. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Public School System spends more money per student than any other public school system in the nation. V: Shot of an African American teacher and student at the front of a classroom; of a white male student seated in a classroom; of an African American female student seated in a classroom. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn has come up with another controversial proposal to fund neighborhood schools; that Flynn has suggested the decentralization of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt adds that the proposal would sell off the downtown headquarters of the Boston School Department on Court Street. V: Shots of the exterior of the Boston School Department headquarters. Footage of Flynn saying that the downtown headquarters of the School Department should be sold; that the money should be put into neighborhood schools. Footage of O'Bryant saying that the School System is going to end up back in court if it does not receive support from the city. Vaillancourt reports that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has supported Flynn's school choice plan; that Wilson's contract ends in June. V: Shots of a meeting in the chambers of the Boston School Committee; of Wilson speaking at a School Committee meeting. Vaillancourt reports that the African American members have voted to extend Wilson's contract in the past. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson's future support among the Committee's African American members may depend on his position on Flynn's school choice plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/16/1989
Description: Charles Stuart's body is pulled from Mystic River, lending a new perspective to the murder of his wife. Press conferences with Newman Flanagan and Ray Flynn. Unusual views of Tobin Bridge. Footage of wrongly accused suspect, Willie Bennett. Interviews with black Mission Hill residents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/04/1990
Description: Ray Flynn's State of the City address focuses on Stuart murder case, police behavior, and racism. He contrasts and challenges stereotypes of different Boston neighborhoods. Interviews with people responding the speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/10/1990