Description: Steve Curwood interviews Louise Day Hicks about her vote in favor of a curfew proposal for the city of Boston. Hicks thinks that the curfew could reduce unrest on the streets in the evenings. She says that she will vote to rescind the curfew if police are shown to use it as a means to harass residents. Hicks notes that the senior citizens and fire fighters support the curfew proposal. They shoot cutaways.
0:58:32: Visual: Steve Curwood interviews Louis Day Hicks in her office. Curwood asks Hicks why she is in favor of a curfew proposal for Boston. Hicks says that senior citizens and fire fighters have requested the curfew; that a curfew could mean greater safety in the evening. Curwood comments that police have called the curfew proposal unenforceable. Hicks says that the city should try the curfew to test its effectiveness; that she voted for it to show solidarity with the senior citizens and fire fighters. Curwood points out the expense involved in a curfew ordinance; that the county may have to pay for private lawyers to defend violators because of the heavy workload of the public defenders. Hicks says that the curfew does not place undue burden on minors, who can move about with a note from their parents; that the curfew can be rescinded if it proves to be unworkable. Hicks says that the curfew could be enforced arbitrarily as a means of harassment; that she will vote to rescind the curfew if this proves to be true. Hicks says that the law could be used to bolster parental authority; that she hopes most parents have authority over their children even without the curfew. Hicks says that she does not know if the mayor will veto the curfew. Curwood thanks Hicks. The crew takes cutaway shots of Curwood and Hicks. Curwood and Hicks speak informally. Hicks talks about her constituents' support for the curfew.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1976
Description: Exteriors of Maverick housing project in East Boston. White children play outside. Lone black girl sits on fence. Black Power and racist graffiti. Boarded up windows. East Boston environs shot from moving car.Sign for Police Station 7. Interview with a Maverick resident, Mrs. Baker, about vandalism and threats from youth, and destruction of her apartment and possessions and death of three dogs due to a fire of suspicious origin. Interview with a priest, Father Corrigan, who says 12 African American families moved out of project because of intimidation and harassment. Shot of Maverick St. sign. Interview with Maverick resident, Mrs. Porter, about the families who moved out, many of whom she knew, and why she's going to stay. They shoot cutaways.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/24/1976
Description: South Boston teens on street. Police on motorcycles. Exterior South Boston High School with broken windows. Hill Stop Deli. “White Power” graffiti painted on street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/25/1976
Description: Exteriors of Mission Hill housing project. Trash strewn about. African American children playing in the parking lot and playing basketball. Steve Curwood interviews with residents including Betty Galloway, Dorothy Johnson, and a woman who doesn't want to give her name. They speak about the strike by BHA maintenance workers, and the past and current condition in the public housing, especially the amount of trash piling up. Accumulated rubbish in a vacant apartment and the chutes to the incinerators. Several takes of reporter standup. Exteriors of Exchange Building (53 State Street). Pedestrians.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/01/1977
Description: Mayor Kevin White, with Speaker Tip O'Neill and Lt. Governor Thomas O'Neill, announces federal discretionary grant for The Boston Plan Project Yes to be used for urban renewal and youth employment. Approximately 10,000 jobs have been created for young adults ages 16-19 living in an entitlement area who are enrolled in school. Jobs are part-time during the school year and full-time during the summer. Jobs are available in both the public and private sectors.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/12/1978
Description: Story on the Drop-a-Dime Program started by Roxbury residents Georgette Watson and Rev. Bruce Wall. Pedestrians on the streets of Roxbury and Roxbury neighborhood in the evening. Watson points out a drug dealer and a building out of which the drug trade operates. Interview with Watson about the drug problem in the city and the effectiveness of the Drop-a-Dime Program. She talks about the role of neighborhood youth in the drug trade. Representatives from the Drop-a-Dime Program were not included in the mayor's newly formed council on drug abuse. Mayor Ray Flynn holds press conference announcing the formation of the council. Ben Thompson, Chairman of the council, says that the council intends to work with anti-crime and drug prevention groups across the city. William Weld, US Attorney for Massachusetts, and Derek Sanderson, former player for the Boston Bruins, stand with the other members of the council at the press conference. Interview with Bruce Wall about how community groups have not been included on the council. He adds that members of community groups understand how the drug trade functions in their neighborhoods. Flynn will go to the Boston City Council to obtain funding to combat drug abuse in the city.
1:00:05: Visual: Shots through the windshield of a traveling car of Boston streets; of Washington Street; of youth gathered in front of a building. Audio of Georgette Watson (Roxbury community leader) talking about drug trafficking in her neighborhood. Watson points out a well-known drug dealer as he walks across the street. Watson talks about the role of neighborhood youth in the drug trade. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Watson is familiar with the drug trade in her neighborhood; that Watson and Reverend Bruce Wall (Roxbury community leader) started the Drop-a-Dime program. Vaillancourt reports that the Drop-a-Dime program encourages residents to phone in tips and information about the drug trade to police; that South Boston and Roxbury police have found the tips to be mostly accurate. V: Shots of Watson and Wall; of a tape recorder. Footage of a hand pressing the play button on the tape recorder. Audiocassette is heard playing in the background of the report. Shots from a traveling car of Washington Street in the evening. Vaillancourt reports that Watson wants to expand Drop-a-Dime program into a city-wide service; that representatives from the program were not included in the mayor's council on drug abuse. V: Footage of Watson saying that Drop-a-Dime deserves more support from the mayor and the city. Vaillancourt reports that the Ray Flynn (Mayor of the City of Boston) held a press conference today to announce his new drug abuse council; that Flynn did not answer questions regarding the absence of Drop-a-Dime representatives from the council. V: Shots of Flynn and his council at a press conference. Footage of Ben Thompson (Chairman of the Council), saying that the council intends to be "inclusive"; that the council intends to work with other anti-crime and drug prevention groups across the city. Footage of Wall saying that community groups need to be included on the mayor's council; that community groups understand how the drug trade functions on the streets of the city. Shots of members of the drug abuse council, including William Weld (US Attorney for Massachusetts) and Derek Sanderson (former player for the Boston Bruins). Footage of Flynn explaining that Sanderson will be paid by the city of Boston; that the rest of the committee is made up of volunteers. Shots of the council preparing to leave the press conference. Vaillancourt notes that the council is made up of local and state officials. Vaillancourt notes that the council will prepare a report on how the city can combat drug abuse; that Flynn will take the report to the Boston City Council in order to obtain funding; that it will be difficult for Flynn to obtain extra funds because of the economic crisis faced by the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/07/1984
Description: Christopher Lydon reports on a controversy over the distribution of contraception in schools. Lydon notes that the Adolescent Issues Task Force of the Boston School Department has recommended that birth control be distributed to students as part of a comprehensive adolescent health program in the city's middle schools and high schools. Lydon's report includes footage of an NAACP press conference with Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP), Joseph Casper (member, Boston School Committee), and Grace Romero (NAACP board member). Robinson and Casper condemn the proposal as racist. Robinson says that the initiative targets African American students. Lydon's report includes footage from interviews with Hubie Jones (member, Adolescent Issues Task Force), Dr. Howard Spivak (member Adolescent Issues Task Force) and Dr. Deborah Prothrow-Stith (Chairwoman, Adolescent Issues Task Force). Jones, Spivak and Prothrow-Stith defend the proposal. Spivak and Prothrow-Stith discuss statistics relating to teen pregnancy. Lydon's report also features interviews with students about teen pregnancy and footage of students in schools.
1:00:11: Visual: Footage of an African American woman saying that she knows "what is going on" with teenagers from listening to them talk. Christopher Lydon reports that teenagers are starting to have sex at an early age. V: Footage of Dr. Howard Spivak (member, Adolescent Issues Task Force) saying that he is alarmed at the numbers of teenagers who are having sex. Spivack says that 25% of teenage girls are sexually active before the age of 15. Footage of Dr. Deborah Prothow-Stith (Chairwoman, Adolescent Issues Task Force) saying that one million girls under the age of nineteen become pregnant each year; that 600,000 of those girls give birth. Prothow-Stith says that teenage pregnancy has become an epidemic. Footage of Spivak quoting a statistic which predicts that 40% of fourteen-year olds will become pregnant before their twentieth birthday. Shot of teenage girls descending a staircase at a school. Lydon reports that the Boston School Department's Adolescent Issues Task Force is recommending the distribution of birth control as part of a comprehensive adolescent health program at Boston's middle schools and high schools. V: Shot of a collection of diaphragms in a health clinic. Shot of a clinic worker and a teenage girl at a school health clinic. Lydon reports that the proposal has been heavily criticized. V: Shot of the street outside of the Boston NAACP office. Footage of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) at a press conference. Robinson says that the NAACP is opposed to the distribution of birth control in school health clinics. Joseph Casper (member, Boston School Committee) and Grace Romero (former member, Boston School Committee and NAACP board member) stand beside Robinson at the press conference. Lydon points out that Casper and Romero are unlikely allies for Robinson. V: Footage of Robinson saying that the plan introduces sexual devices into the schools under the guise of a health initiative. Robinson says that African American schools and school districts are the targets of these plans; that the plans are a form of "social engineering." Lydon notes that Robinson believes the proposal to be "insidiously racist." V: Footage of Hubie Jones (member, Adolescent Issues Task Force) saying that the proposal has nothing to do with race. Footage of Casper saying that the proposal targets inner city students; that there are no proposals to distribute birth control among white suburban students. Casper says that "something is afoot." Footage of Jones saying that it is genocidal to allow large numbers of African American teenage girls to become pregnant. Lydon reports that Jones sees the proposal as a "regrettable necessity," needed to combat the incidence of pregnancy in young girls. V: Shots of teenage students in a study hall. Footage of Prothow-Stith saying that the Task Force is concerned about the increase of pregnancies among girls aged ten to fourteen. Footage of a young African American male student saying that a lot of teenage girls are pregnant; of a young Hispanic male student saying that he knows a girl in ninth-grade with a child. Footage of another African American male student saying that he knows a thirteen-year old girl who became pregnant; that the girl has dropped out of school. Footage of a white female student saying that she knows eighth grade girls who are pregnant; that it is wrong for young girls to be pregnant. Shots of students outside of a school. Lydon says that everyone seems to agree that young girls should not be pregnant.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1986
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Roxbury community leaders met behind closed doors to draw up a plan to deal with the growing problem of gang violence in the community. Jones reports on the recent deaths of Roxbury residents Darlene Tiffany Moore and Richard Bailey. Jones' report includes photos of Bailey and Moore. Four suspects in the Bailey murder, including Shango Dilday, Demetrius Dunston, and Emmett Snow, were arraigned today in Roxbury District Court. Interview with Barry Snow (uncle of Emmett Snow) about the arraignment. Police have arrested Roxbury resident Shawn Drumgold and another suspect in connection with Moore's death. Information from the community led to Drumgold's arrest. Press conference with Police Commissioner Francis "Mickey" Roache, who says that police are working with members of the community to solve crimes. Interview with Roxbury resident Terrence Kelley about the increase in violence. City Councilor Bruce Bolling speaks to the press.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) and Gloria Fox (State Representative) entering a building. Members of the press remain outside. Marcus Jones reports that Roxbury leaders met behind closed doors to draw up a plan to deal with the growing problem of gang violence. V: Shot of a Boston Herald newspaper article a headline reading, "Police vow to capture girl's killers." The article features a photo of Darlene Tiffany Moore (Roxbury resident and shooting victim). Jones reports that two Roxbury youngsters have been killed in less than two weeks; that Moore was killed in the crossfire of two warring drug gangs on August 19. V: Shot of the Humboldt Street location where Moore was killed. Jones reports that Richard Bailey (Roxbury resident, age 14) was stabbed to death by a rival gang member over the past weekend. V: Shot of a color photo of Bailey. Jones stands on the corner of Copeland Street in Roxbury. Jones reports that Bailey was one of several gang members being chased by a rival gang; that Bailey was caught and stabbed by the rival gang member. Jones reports that four suspects in the Bailey murder were arraigned today in Roxbury District Court. V: Shot of Francis "Mickey" Roache (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) approaching the podium at a press conference. William Celester (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) and another man stand stand behind him. Footage of a lawyer at the arraignment of the suspect. The lawyer addresses the judge, saying that the government does not have a case against his client. Shots of Clarence Dilday (father of Shango Dilday) in the audience of the courtroom; of Barry Snow (uncle of Emmett Snow) in the audience of the courtroom; of other audience members. Jones reports that a 14-year-old juvenile was arraigned in court today; that Shango Dilday (Roxbury resident), Demetrius Dunston (Roxbury resident) and Emmett Snow (Roxbury resident) were also arraigned. V: Footage of Barry Snow saying that he brought Emmett Snow to court today so that the situation could be straightened out. Shot of Shawn Drumgold (Roxbury resident) in Roxbury District Court. Jones reports that police have arrested Drumgold and another suspect in connection with the Moore shooting; that police arrested Drumgold in court where he was being arraigned on a heroin charge. [Shot of Drumgold in Roxbury District Court. Jones reports that the information from the community aided police in making Drumgold's arrest. V: Footage of Roache at a press conference. Roache says that he has spoken to members of the Roxbury community; that members of the community are willing to do whatever they can to help police. Footage of Jones interviewing Terrence Kelley (Roxbury resident) on the street. Jones asks Kelley if there will be an end to the violence. Kelley says that the violence may only be at its beginning. Shot of Jones stands with other members of the media outside of the building in which Roxbury community leaders are meeting. Jones reports that today's meeting is a signal that Roxbury leaders are serious about ending the violence. V: Footage of Bolling speaking to the press outside of the building. Bolling says that community leaders are going to work together to get rid of the negative elements in the community. Shot of Copeland Street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/29/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC) provides a safe haven from street violence for young people in the area. Jones reports that some young people at the DYC have formed their own music groups and write their own songs. Jones interviews Robert Bostic (15-year old Roxbury resident) and his friends. Bostic says that he is using rap music to send a positive message. Jones also interviews Al McClain (DYC counselor), who talks about the impact of the DYC on the lives of the neighborhood teenagers. Jones reports that the DYC-member group One Nation has released an album. Jones interviews DeMaul Golson (DYC member) and other members of the group One Nation. Jones also interviews Todd Maxell (16-year old Roxbury resident), who says that teenagers will listen to anti-violence messages from their peers. The report includes footage of Natalie Jacobson (WCVB-TV) and R.D. Sahl (WNEV-TV) reporting on crime in Roxbury. The report also features footage of teenagers at the DYC, footage of the members of One Nation performing on stage and footage from a video produced by teenagers at the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club. This tape includes additional footage of DYC members and a music video called "Stand Back From Crack" filmed inside Back Bay Station.
1:00:29: Visual: Footage of the members of the group One Nation dancing and performing on stage. Footage from WNEV of R.D. Sahl (WNEV reporter) reporting on gang violence in Roxbury. Footage from WCVB of Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) reporting on shootings in Roxbury. Shots of paramedics wheeling an injured African American woman out of a building; of police vehicles and an ambulance on a street in Roxbury; of paramedics tending to an injured African American patient inside of an ambulance. Marcus Jones reports that a group of Roxbury youngsters are not surrenduring to the violence in Roxbury. V: Footage of Robert Bostic (15-year old Roxbury resident) sitting with a group of his friends. Bostic says that he wants to set a good example for young people; that young people should avoid violence. Bostic says that he and his friends are using rap to send a positive message. Jones reports that Bostic and his friends are members of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC). V: Shots of Bostic and other members of the Youth Collaborative; of a sign for the Youth Collaborative. Shots of African American youth entering the Youth Collaborative building. Footage of Al McClain (Counselor, Dorchester Youth Collaborative) saying that the Youth Collaborative has had a great impact; that some of the members of the Youth Collaborative used to be in gangs. Shots of members of the youth collaborative dancing to rap music; of Jones sitting with the members of the youth collaborative. Jones reports that some of the members of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative have formed groups to make music. Jones notes that some of the youth write their own music; that the DYC member group One Nation has released an album about AIDS. V: Shot of the cover of an album by the group One Nation. Footage of One Nation members performing a rap song about street violence. Footage of Jones interviewing DeMaul Golson (DYC member) and two other African American male DYC members. Jones asks the boys if they are scared by the street violence. The boys say yes. Golson says that his cousin was shot in the back; that his cousin is dead. Footage of One Nation members performing on stage. Jones reports that the DYC members are determined to rise above the violence. Jones notes that members of the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club are also doing their best to fight the violence. V: Footage of a video produced by members of the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club. Footage of Bostic saying that most kids are not going to listen to their parents' advice; that kids are influenced by the people on the streets who are making money from drugs. Footage of Todd Maxwell (16-year old Roxbury resident) saying that kids might listen to their peers if their peers tell them not to do drugs. Shots of an African American man being led into a police station by police officers; of police standing near a cordoned-off crime scene.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/01/1989
Description: David Boeri reports on a legislative hearing about urban issues in the Roxbury neighborhood, where city and state officials addressed the panel. Mayor Ray Flynn, District Attorney Newman Flanagan, and Judge Julian Houston of the Roxbury District Court address the panel. Boeri reports that the congressmen were interested in the Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC) program. Emmit Folgert of the DYC, along with Dorchester teens Lawrence McKinley and Andrew Young address the panel. They talk about gang activity in the neighborhood. Boeri reports that many teen counselors believe that drug education and prevention should focus on the after-school hours. DYC offers entertainment, music, sports, and a safe place for teenagers. Interview with Al McClain of DYC, and Dorchester teens William Woods, Abigail Santana, and Mickey McBride about the DYC. The teens dance and hang out at DYC. Boeri reports that the congressmen are being urged to fund community centers like the DYC. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Carmen Fields interviews Shirley Caesar
1:00:13: Visual: Footage of speakers addressing a congressional hearing in Roxbury. The congressional panel includes Congressman Joseph Moakley and Charles Rangel. Shots of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addressing the panel; of Newman Flanagan (District Attorney) addressing the panel; of Julian Houston (judge, Roxbury District Court). Shots of the panel. Shot of William Celester (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department). David Boeri reports that legislators on the panel at the congressional hearing wanted to hear from residents of Roxbury and Dorchester; that the panel first heard from Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Flynn and other officials. V: Shots of African American attendees at the meeting. Shot of Georgette Watson (Roxbury resident) at the hearing. Audio of Emmet Folgert (Dorchester Youth Collaborative). Folgert says that the US has given up on poor urban teens; that poor urban teens have given up on America. Shots of audience members. Footage of Lawrence McKinney (Dorchester teen) describing the gang culture in his neighborhood. Footage of Andrew Young (Dorchester teen) talking about dangerous gang members in his neighborhood. Shots of the exterior of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC); of a sign for the DYC. Shots of teenagers entering the DYC. Boeri reports that the DYC is a safe haven for many teens; that Congressman are interested in the DYC program. V: Shots of a white girl and an African American girl dancing to music in a room at the DYC; of other teens in the room with the girls. Boeri reports that drug activity takes place after school. Boeri notes that counselors think that drug education and prevention should be focused on after-school hours. V: Footage of Al McClain (DYC) being interviewed by Boeri at the DYC. Boeri asks McClain what the teens would be doing if they were not at the DYC. McClain says that the teens would probably be out on the streets; that they might get into drugs. Footage of William Woods (Dorchester teen) saying that he does not want to get into trouble. Boeri reports that the DYC offers entertainment, music, and sports; that some kids go to the DYC to do their homework. V: Shots of teens at the DYC; of a two boys dancing to music in a room at the DYC. Footage of Abigail Santana (Dorchester teen) and Mickey McBride (Dorchester teen) being interviewed by Boeri at the DYC. Boeri asks about the activity on the streets. Santana says that people are drinking alcohol on the streets. McBride says that people are selling drugs and shooting each other. McBride says that she likes being at the DYC. Boeri stands outside of the entrance to the DYC. Boeri reports that DYC counselors complain that President George Bush's drug program directs funding to jails, schools, and treatment centers; that the drug program does not fund community centers like the DYC. V: Footage of McClain saying that the teens at the DYC are like a big family; that the teens try to reach out to others who are on the streets. Shots of two boys dancing to music at the DYC. The boys are wearing WGBH T-shirts. Boeri reports that Congressmen are being urged to take a closer look at DYC. V: Footage of Emmet Folgert (DYC) speaking at the congressional hearing. Folgert says that community centers should be funded; that community centers provide positive adult role models. Shot of the two boys dancing at the DYC.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/06/1989