Description: Marcus Jones reports that drug addicts and community leaders held a demonstration in front of the Massachusetts State House, lobbying for more funding for drug treatment centers in Massachusetts. There are not enough publicly funded treatment programs to meet demand. Demonstrators hold signs and chant. Reverend Graylan Hagler and others address the demonstrators. Hagler says that access to drug treatment is a class issue. State Rep. Gloria Fox tells demonstrators to let state legislators know that drug treatment centers are needed. Interview with recovering addict David Watson about the need for treatment centers. Interview with another recovering drug addict who says that she intends to register to vote. Jones reports that the demonstrators went into the State House to register to vote after the rally, and they intend to vote against legislators who do not support their cause.
1:00:15: Visual: Footage of a demonstration in front of the Massachusetts State House. Supporters of treatment facilities for drug addiction are gathered. A man leads the demonstrators in a cheer. Shot of a sign reading, "Don't treat addiction as a crime. Treat it as a disease." Marcus Jones reports that hundreds of people were expected to attend today's demonstration outside of the State House; that rainy weather may have kept some demonstrators away. Jones notes that the demonstration went on as planned; that the demonstrators are committed to their cause. V: Shots of speakers and attendees at the demonstration. Footage of Nathaniel Askia (drug treatment provider) addressing the crowd. Askia tells the demonstrator to remain committed to the cause. Askia predicts that the movement will be successful. Shot of a button pinned to the shirt of a demonstrator. The button reads, "Treatment on demand." Jones reports that the demonstrators support drug treatment on demand; that the demand for drug treatment in Massachusetts is growing. Jones notes that over 1,000 drug addicts are turned away from treatment facilities each day in Massachusetts; that there are not enough publicly funded treatment programs to meet the demand. V: Shots of the demonstrators. The demonstrators carry umbrellas and wear hats to protect themselves from rain. Footage of Reverend Graylan Ellis-Hagler (Church of the United Community) addressing the crowd. Ellis-Hagler says that access to drug treatment is a class issue. Ellis-Hagler says that Kitty Dukakis (wife of Governor Michael Dukakis) has access to treatment because she belongs to the upper class. Ellis-Hagler says that class, race, gender, and sexual preference may bar some from treatment for their addictions. Jones reports that David Watson (recovering drug addict) was recently admitted to a treatment program; that Watson is recovering from 24 years of substance abuse. V: Footage of Watson being interviewed by Jones. Watson says that citizens will end up paying the price if more treatment centers are not built. Watson says that addicts are likely to steal and commit crime in order to pay for their habits. Watson says that he began stealing to support his habit at one point in the past. Footage of the supporters cheering at the demonstration. A leader leads the supporters in chanting, "What do we want? Treatment. When do we want it? Now." Footage of Gloria Fox (State Representative) addressing the crowd. Fox says that the demonstrators must let the legislators know that drug treatment centers are needed; that the legislators will soon begin work on the state budget. Footage of Brenda (recovering drug addict) being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks Brenda if she has registered to vote. Brenda says that she is going to register to vote today. Brenda says that she intends to vote; that she thinks her vote will make a difference. Jones stands outside of the State House. Traffic passes on the street behind him. Jones reports that demonstrators went into the State House to register to vote after the rally. Jones reports that the demonstrators will vote against legislators who do not support an increase in the present drug treatment program.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports that some African American leaders, including Jesse Jackson, are promoting the use of the term "African American" instead of the term "black." Comedian Charles Cozart on the Arsenio Hall Show. Interview with Northeastern lecturer Robert Hayden, who promotes the use of the term. Hayden says that it is an accurate term that reflects the roots and history of African Americans. Interview with Elma Lewis, the Director of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, who believes that the term "black" is more inclusive. Lewis says that not all black people in the US are Americans. Interviews with students and teachers at the Ellis School in Roxbury about which term they prefer. Following the edited story is additional footage of Jones speaking to students and teachers at the Ellis School. Jones answers questions about his report on Jackie Robinson and the race relations of the time. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston School Committee is deeply divided over whether to renew the contract of Laval Wilson
1:00:11: V: Footage from the Arsenio Hall Show. Charles Cozart (comedian) tells jokes in front of the audience. Marcus Jones reports that the African American community is debating the use of the term "black." Jones notes that Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) is urging the use of the term "African American" instead of "black." V: Shots of Jackson addressing an audience. Shots of African Americans in the audience. Footage of Robert Hayden (Lecturer, Northeastern University) saying that many people of color have been calling themselves "African Americans" for years. Hayden says that many universities have departments of African American studies. Hayden says that people of African descent were living in Boston in the eighteenth century; that those people referred to their community as "African." Hayden says that the term is "accurate" and "useful." Footage of Elma Lewis (Director, National Center of Afro-American Artists) being interviewed by Jones. Lewis says that she does not have to follow the trend. Jones notes that Lewis is opposed to using the term "African American." V: Footage of Lewis saying that Africa is a whole continent. Lewis says that the terms "Nigerian American" or "Jamaican American" are more appropriate than "African American." Lewis says that the term "black American" is more inclusive. Footage of Jones addressing a class at the David A. Ellis School in Roxbury. Jones asks how many of the students are aware of the debate surrounding the term "African American." A few students raise their hands. Jones says that he asked students and teachers at the Ellis School in Roxbury about the terms "African American" and "black." V: Shots of students. Footage of an African American female student saying that it does not matter which term is used. Footage of a Latina teacher saying that there should be no mention of race in identification terms. Footage of an African American teacher asking if the term would be extended to "Afro-English" for blacks living in England. Footage of an African American male student saying that he likes the term "brown." Footage of a female student saying that it doesn't matter. Footage of Hayden saying that the term might inspire some to think about their African roots. Hayden says that some people might begin to look into their family histories. Footage of Lewis saying that it is important to teach children to be proud of their African roots. Lewis says that not all black people in the US are American; that all black people in the US are black. Shots of African Americans walking on a street; of a group of students walking away from a school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1989
Description: Andrew Young, Ambassador to the United Nations, speaks at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He takes questions about the UN, divestment from South Africa, the Middle East peace process and the Carter Administration. He also discusses his transition from the civil rights movement to politics. Young has a good rapport with the students in the audience.
0:00:44: Visual: Andrew Young (Ambassador to the United Nations) speaks at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. A representative from the school sits on stage while Young speaks. Young talks about the Trilateral Commission. He says that the Trilateral Commission "is the rich people of the world getting together to talk." Young says that UN has been criticized for being a part of the "Western Bloc"; that five members of the UN Security Council are western nations; that the UN must make policy with all nations in mind. Young describes UN efforts to initiate an arms embargo against South Africa; that the UN resolution on South Africa was not as strong as many would have liked; that the resolution is effective because all of South Africa's trading partners have agreed on it. Young mentions the "North-South dialogue." He says that it is important for nations to deal with issues like trade, debt relief and foreign aid as a group; that the Trilateral Commission is a negotiating group. Young says that there are competition and adversarial relationships among members of the Trilateral Commission; that the members of the Trilateral Commission are competing with each other, not with the Third World. 0:04:12: V: Young responds to an audience member's question about the UN Security Council. Young says that the US, France and England are permanent members of the Security Council; that France and Canada hold two of the rotating seats. Young has a good rapport with the crowd. The crowd laughs at his jokes. An audience member asks about UN policy in Africa. Young says that he does not think pressure should be put on US corporations to divest from South Africa. Young adds that companies would continue to invest in South Africa through complicated transactions using foreign subsidiaries. Young notes that the students at Harvard should be learning all about the complicated finances of multi-national corporations. Young says that nothing would change through divestment; that US corporations are complicit with the government of South Africa; that change can be wrought through the guilt felt by these corporations. He notes that the students should continue to put pressure on Harvard's Board of Directors to divest from South Africa. He says that students should be idealistic, while administrators like him must be realistic. An audience member asks about the Carter Administration's policy in the Middle East. Young says that Jimmy Carter (US President) has been willing to expend political capital pushing for a peace settlement in the Middle East. Young says that Carter has never tried to impose peace on the parties involved in the conflict. Young says that Anwar Sadat (President of Egypt) has moved boldly to move the peace process forward; that the Carter Administration must work with Sadat; that the USSR must be forced to participate in the peace process; that the USSR will undermine the peace process if they are not involved. Young notes that Sadat and the Soviets have had a difficult relationship. 0:12:55: V: An audience member asks how he can remain morally conscious when the policy he conducts for the US is not always morally conscious. Young says that protest movements in the 1960s have led to a reawakening of the nation's moral conscience; that the Carter Administration was voted into office by morally conscious voters. Young notes that it is easier to protest than it is to govern; that the Carter Administration is staffed with idealistic, moral people of all races and ethnicities. Young notes that he chose to enter politics to put his ideals into action; that effective change can be made through politics as well as protest. Young talks about his experiences in the civil rights movement and the movement against the Vietnam War. Young says that there was a logical progression from the protest movements of the 1960s to the politics of change in the 1970s. Young says that he took his post in order to effect change in foreign policy; that foreign policy issues and domestic policy are closely related; that he has not compromised his ideals in performing his job. Young jokes that he tries to stand up for what is right while doing his job; that he might be looking for a new job someday because of that; that perhaps Harvard will hire him if he ever needs a job. The audience laughs at the joke. 0:18:30: V: An audience member asks Young if he has seen an increase in "television diplomacy." Young says that he has seen an increase in "television diplomacy." Young responds to another audience question. Young says that the Carter Administration is staffed with people who are advocating change; that these people were outside of politics before. Young notes that Ernie Green (Assistant Secretary for Manpower) was one of the students who integrated Little Rock High School in 1958; that Green is working hard to create jobs within the African American communities; that he has been working on the problem for only six months. Young notes that an African American lawyer from Harvard helped prepare the brief for the Bakke court case. Young notes that Patricia Harris is Carter's Secretary for Housing and Urban Development. Young says that African American organizations needs to work within the structure of the government; that the activists in the civil rights movement were working with the Kennedy Administration in the early 1960s.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/06/1977
Description: Interview with Andrew Young, Mayor of Atlanta at the Parker House. Young talks about his efforts to facilitate international trade between Atlanta businesses and third-world nations. He says that urban mayors can help local businesses by leading trade delegations and encouraging local businesses to get involved in emerging markets. Young criticizes the federal government's reliance on the military in conducting foreign policy. He says that the US must act with intelligence and rely on diplomacy to solve world problems. He talks about US involvement in Vietnam, Lebanon, and El Salvador. Young and Christy George discuss African Americans in politics. Young does not believe that a candidate should not represent one single constituency. Young says that more African Americans need to be elected as senators, mayors and governors before an African American is elected as president. George reasks questions for cutaways. Young attends a cocktail party at the Parker House. Other guests include Bruce Bolling, Boston City Councilor, and Hubie Jones, Dean of the School of Social Work at Boston University.
1:00:04: Visual: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) is interviewed by Christy George in the Parker House. George asks about urban mayors taking on international roles. George notes that Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) is interested in Young's work in Atlanta with third-world nations; that Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) calls Boston a "world-class city." Young says that most governments help businesses; that the federal government has done little to help businesses. Young says that mayors can help local businesses. Young talks about leading trade delegations of Atlanta businessmen to other parts of the world. Young says that businessmen can gain access to government officials through the mayor. Young says that he took businesspeople, educators and a YMCA soccer team on a trip to Jamaica and Trinidad. Young says that the businesspeople did $150 million of business during a one-week trade mission. Young says that business people were allowed to see the decision-makers in foreign governments. Young says that white mayors can do the same thing. Young says that the mayors of Seattle and Indianapolis have done the same thing. Young says that there are large concentrations of Dutch and Japanese businesses in Georgia; that he is trying to build on that. George notes that African-American mayors are now dealing with third-world countries. Young says that the emerging markets are in the third world. Young says that he will visit Nigeria next week. Young says that Nigeria is buying products from Atlanta; that Nigeria is developing at a rapid rate. Young notes that Japanese and German businesses have been doing business with the third world for a long time. Young says that US businesses never needed to do business abroad until 1975. George notes that Young had been talking about doing business with the third world when he worked for Jimmy Carter (former US President). George remarks that the Democratic Party has not advocated more trade with the third world. Young says that Ronald Reagan (US President) sees everything in terms of an East-West conflict. Young says that the US needs to look beyond the East-West conflict. Young talks about US involvement in Egypt and Panama in the 1970s. Young says that diplomatic treaties can undercut communist influence. Young says that military solutions seem popular, easy and "macho." Young says that military solutions have seldom succeeded for the US or for the Soviet Union. 1:05:15: V: George asks what the Democratic Party should be doing to prepare for the 1984 elections. Young says that the Democratic Party must approach world problems with "reason and sanity." Young talks about how the US was drawn into the Vietnam War. Young says that US ships are present off the coasts of Central America and Lebanon; that the US could easily become trapped in a military situation in one of these regions. Young says that there is no military solution in Lebanon; that the US has no business there. Young says that there is no military solution in El Salvador. Young says that the US needs to show its strength through intelligence; that the US should not show its strength through destructiveness. Young says that the Democratic Party must offer clear a alternative to Reagan. Young says that the US is living on the brink of war; that this policy is insane. George asks how the Democratic Party should deal with political unrest and revolutions in the third world. Young says that the US needs to understand the impulses behind revolutions in third world country. Young says that Harry Truman (former US President) probably did not know that Ho Chi Min (former Vietnamese leader) worked as a chef at the Parker House while he was a student in Boston. Young talks about the influence of American ideas of freedom on Ho Chi Min in the 1940s. Young says that third world leaders should not be discounted as Marxists. Jump cut in videotape. George asks if African Americans need an African American candidate for president in 1984 in order to gain political influence. Young says that he disagrees; that politicians should not represent only one segment of the population. Young says that the present Democratic candidates have strong records on civil rights and minority issues. Young says that African Americans need to be involved in the campaign of a winning candidate. Young says that candidates never live up to promises made at the convention. George asks if it is time for an African American presidential candidate. Young says that there need to be more African American mayors, governors and senators before there is an African American president. George closes the interview. 1:09:57: V: The crew takes cutaway shots of George. 1:14:40: V: Footage of a cocktail reception at the Parker House. Attendees eat, drink, and socialize. Attendees include Hubie Jones (Dean of the School of Social Work, Boston University), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), Carol Bolling (wife of Bruce Bolling), Young, and others. Shot of Young socializing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/22/1983
Description: Deborah Wang reports that notes that Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) was the keynote speaker at a gathering of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund gathered in Boston this evening. Wang notes that many members of the Legal Defense Fund are skeptical of President George Bush's commitment to civil rights; she adds that civil rights advocates are worried about Bush making conservative appointments to the judiciary. Wang interviews Young about Bush's presidency and his possible judicial appointments. Young says that Bush did not exhibit fairness and decency during the presidential campaign. Wang interviews Tom Franklin and Rona Kiley of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Franklin and Kiley say that Bush is beholden to the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Wang reports that there will be several openings in lower courts and a possible opening on the Supreme Court during Bush's term in office. Wang's report is accompanied by footage of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund gathering, by footage of Bush giving a speech and by footage of Ronald Reagan standing by as a judge is sworn in.
1:00:09: Visual: Shots of a gathering of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Attendees of the gathering are socializing in a large room. Footage of Tom Franklin (NAACP Legal Defense Fund) saying that his colleagues do not have a high regard for George Bush (US President-elect). Franklin says that he hopes that Bush will show more character and leadership than he has shown so far. Franklin says that he does not have high expectations for the Bush presidency. Footage of Bush addressing the Coalition of Black Republicans on August 11, 1988. Bush announces the formation of the Black Americans for Bush Committee. Wang reports that many members of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund are skeptical of Bush's commitment to civil rights. Wang notes that Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) was the keynote speaker at tonight's gathering of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. V: Footage of Young being interviewed by Wang. Young says that he wants to believe that Bush is not as bad as his campaign was. Young says that Bush could be counted on for decency and fairness in the past; that Bush did not exhibit decency and fairness during the presidential campaign. Footage of Franklin saying that Bush is beholden to the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Franklin says that Bush will talk about civil rights; that he will not take any action on civil rights issues. Wang reports that civil rights advocates are worried about Bush making conservative appointments to the judiciary. V: Shots of the exterior of the Supreme Court Building; of Reagan standing by as a federal judge is sworn in. Shot of Reagan standing behind an official at a press conference. Wang notes that there may be openings on the Supreme Court; that there will be numerous openings in lower courts. V: Footage of Young being interviewed by Wang. Young says that Bush needs to decide which wing of the Republican Party to represent. Young says that the "Eastern establishment" wing of the Republican Party has generally made wise judicial appointments. Footage of Rona Kiley (NAACP Legal Defense Fund) being interviewed by Wang. Kiley says that Bush has been playing to the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Kiley says that she hopes that Bush will not adopt Ronald Reagan's "litmus test" for making judicial appointments. Shots of the members of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund as they socialize.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/15/1988
Description: Christy George reports from Atlanta on African American residents' views of the Democratic presidential ticket and the Democratic National Convention. George notes that Michael Dukakis needs to show African American voters that he wants their support. Interviews with employees and customers at the Auburn Rib Shack. The interviewees support Jesse Jackson and hope that Jackson will be named as Dukakis's running mate. George notes that both Dukakis and Lloyd Bentsen have good records on civil rights and that Jackson's supporters may be waiting for Jackson to throw his support behind Dukakis. Interviews with African Americans in Atlanta about Jackson and Dukakis. Many interviewees are skeptical about Dukakis. George's report also features footage of Jackson speaking to an audience and footage of Dukakis addressing the Democratic National Convention.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage of James Wyatt (Atlanta resident) driving his cab in Atlanta. Wyatt talks about how life has changed in Atlanta since the civil rights movement. Christy George reports that Wyatt is 84 years old; that he has been driving a cab for 52 years. V: Footage of Wyatt talking about how is mother used to work in the cafeteria of a white school. Wyatt says that she would bring the leftovers home to him. Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American leader) addressing an audience. Jackson talks about how his mother could not prepare a Thanksgiving meal for his family. Jackson say that his mother was busy serving another family's meal. Footage of Wyatt saying that he would have liked to have seen Jackson as the Democratic nominee or as the running mate of Michael Dukakis (Democratic nominee for US President). Christy George stands in front of the Auburn Rib Shack in Atlanta. George reports that Dukakis needs to ask African American voters what they want. V: Footage of an African American female working behind a counter in a restaurant. The woman says that some voters may vote for the Republican ticket if they are disappointed in the Democratic ticket. Footage of an African American male saying that many voters will be upset if Jackson is left off of the Democratic ticket. Shot of an African American man working in the kitchen of the Auburn Rib Shack. George reports that workers and customers at the Auburn Rib Shack are hoping that Jackson will named to the Democratic ticket. V: Footage of an African American man saying that many African Americans registered to vote in order to vote for Jackson. Footage of Dukakis speaking from a podium at the Democratic National Convention. Jackson and Lloyd Bentsen (US Senator) stand on each side of Dukakis. Dukakis says that he wants Jackson and his supporters to play a major role in the presidential campaign. George reports that Dukakis and Bentsen both have good civil rights records. George notes that African American voters may be waiting for Jackson to throw his support behind Dukakis. V: Footage of an African American woman in the driver's seat of a car. The woman says that Jackson deserves a chance. Footage of an African American woman saying that it is time for a change; that the US is ready for an African American candidate. Footage of two women wearing T-shirts which read, "Jesse Walk Out." The women say that Dukakis should go back to Massachusetts. Footage of Wyatt talking about Dukakis. Wyatt says that he has not heard much about Dukakis; that the Democratic Party needs a good leader. Shot of Wyatt's cab turning a corner.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/18/1988
Description: Christy George reports from the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta. George reports that Atlanta is the heart of the new South; she adds that the region is becoming more diverse, and has been energized by an influx of industry and culture. George reports that the Mississippi Delegation to the Democratic National Convention is said to lead the region on issues of race relations. George notes that the Mississippi delegates are representative of the new South. Interviews with Mississippi delegates Jesse Banks, Ed Cole, Isaiah Frederides, Sherry Fisher, Deborah Dunn and Joe Gaitlin. Each delegate expresses pride in the political process and talks about the changes in the state of Mississippi. George reviews the struggle by African Americans for inclusion in the Democratic Party. George discusses the history of African Americans at the Democratic National Convention from 1948 to 1968. George's report includes footage of civil rights protesters in the 1960s and footage of the Democratic National Convention in the 1960s. George's report is also accompanied by footage of Jesse Jackson at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. George notes that Jackson has led a new group of people into the Democratic Party.
1:00:16: Visual: Black and white footage from Eyes on the Prize of Fannie Lou Hamer (Mississippi Freedom Delegation) at the Democratic National Convention in 1964. Black and white footage from "Eyes on the Prize" of African Americans exiting a bus; of white political officials. Shots of a uniformed man taking American flags from the hands of African American demonstrators; of African American demonstrators marching with American flags. Shots of a Democratic National Convention from the 1960s. Christy George reports that African Americans have been fighting for inclusion in the Democratic Party since 1948; that white delegates from Mississippi and Alabama walked out of the convention in 1948 to protest a civil rights plank in the party platform. George notes that the Mississippi Freedom Delegation was seated at the Democratic National Convention in 1968. V: Footage of Jessie Banks (resident of Tchula, Mississippi) talking about the seating of the Mississippi Freedom Delegation at the 1968 convention. George reports that Banks is now a Mississippi delegate to the Democratic National Convention; that the Mississippi delegation is said to lead the South on the issue of race relations. V: Shot of the Mississippi delegation on the floor of the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) addressing the convention on July 19, 1988. Jackson announces that Ed Cole (Mississippi delegate) is the leader of the Mississippi delegation; that Cole is African American. Shots of Jackson exiting a building. He waves to voters. A bus awaits Jackson. A banner on the bus reads, "Rainbow voter registration campaign." Jackson stands in the entrance to the bus, waving to supporters. George reports that Jackson has a led a new group of people into the Democratic Party. V: Footage of State Representative Isaiah Frederides (resident of Gulfport, Mississippi) says that his mother was a domestic servant; that his mother was fired from her job when he tried to register to vote; that his father-in-law's job was threatened. Frederides says that he and his wife were the first two African Americans to register to vote in his county. Footage of Sherry Fisher (resident of Vicksburg, Mississippi) saying that she is attending a convention for the first time; that she wants to be a part of the US democracy. She says that it feels good to be a part of the changes in Mississippi and the US. Shot of delegates on the floor of the 1988 convention. George says that the "new South" is focused on sharing power between those of common backgrounds. V: Footage of Deborah Dunn (resident of Bruce, Mississippi) being interviewed by George. Dunn says that she is a white woman who has picked cotton and worked hard for what she has. Dun says that all southerners are proud of what they have achieved. Footage of Jackson addressing the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Jackson calls Atlanta the "crucible of the new South." V: Shots of the Atlanta skyline; of construction workers working on a new building in Atlanta. George reports that Atlanta is becoming a major urban center. V: Footage from WNEV-TV of an Atlanta Hawks basketball game. Footage of Joe Gatlin (resident of Laurel, Mississippi) saying that industry has come to Atlanta from the north; that industry has brought culture and diversity. Gatlin says that the South is diversifying while keeping some of its old values. Shots of the Atlanta skyline. George reports that diversity and new people may energize the Democratic Party as it is energizing the South. V: Footage of Banks saying that she has great hope for the nation; that the Democratic Party has great African American and white leaders. Christy George stands in downtown Atlanta. George reports that African Americans and whites live in harmony and prosperity in Atlanta; that the Democratic Party will begin to understand the "new South" after holding its convention in Atlanta.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/20/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force has announced its candidate endorsements for the upcoming elections. Footage from a press conference at which the Task Force announces its slate of candidates. Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for State Representative) addresses the audience. The Task Force has generated controversy by endorsing some white candidates over African American candidates. Footage of Georgette Watson and Robert Rufo talking about Black Political Task Force endorsement. Jones interviews Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) about the endorsements. Clips of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP), Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist), and Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) commenting on the endorsements. Clips of Mel King (political activist) and Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) campaigning.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage of Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) addressing a crowd at a press conference in front of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial on Boston Common. Hardie talks about the mission of the Black Political Task Force. Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force was started in 1979; that the Task Force is comprised of 60 minority activists who collect dues, hold forums, and endorse candidates. V: Shots of a male Task Force member wearing a Bob Rufo campaign pin; of a female Task Force member; of Mel King (political acitivist) campaigning in Roxbury; of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts). Jones reports that the Task Force endorsed Mel King in the 1983 mayoral race; that they endorsed Michael Dukakis in the 1982 governor's race. V: Shots of African American campaign workers holding campaign signs for Georgette Watson (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff); of Bob Rufo (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff) shaking hands with Hardie. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Bob Rufo over Georgette Watson in the race for Suffolk County Sheriff. V: Footage of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) saying that the Task Force does not always have to endorse African American candidates; that Watson deserves the endorsement of the Task Force because she is a good leader. Footage of Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist) saying that the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo was unfair; that the endorsement was "a political slap in the face to Watson." Jones says that Watson was shaken by the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo. V: Footage of Watson with supporters at a press conference. Watson has tears in her eyes. Watson says that the Task Force's decision has been an "emotional experience"; that she is going to wage a winning campaign. Footage of Hardie at the Task Force press conference. Hardie says that Rufo is a better candidate for the position than Watson. Footage of Rufo saying that the race is important to him; that the voters need to decide which candidate is most qualified for the position. Rufo says that he hopes that the endorsement does not become an issue between him and Watson. Jones says that the Task Force announced its full slate of candidates at the press conference today. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Rufo for Suffolk County Sheriff, Gerry D'Amico for lieutenant governor, Jo Ann Shotwell for attorney general, Byron Rushing for state representative for the ninth Suffolk District. Jones notes that the Task Force endorsed Salvatore DiMasi over Regina Placid for state representative of the third Suffolk District. V: Shots of Rufo at the Task Force press conference; of Gerry D'Amico (candidate for lieutenant governor) at the press conference; of Jo Ann Shotwell (candidate for state attorney general) at the press conference; of Byron Rushing (candidate for state representative) at the press conference. Footage of Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for state representative) at the Task Force press conference. DiMasi says that this endorsement shows that people from different communities and ethnic backgrounds are working together. DiMasi says that he is proud to receive the Task Force's endorsement. Footage of Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) saying that the Task Force's endorsement does not represent the true voice of the African American community. Footage of Hardie at the press conference. Hardie says that the Task Force is accustomed to the controversy which often accompanies their endorsements. Jones stands on the Boston Common. Jones reports that no one can predict if the Task Force's endorsements will make a difference in the upcoming elections. Jones notes that critics of the Task Force say that their endorsements may backfire. Jones says that some critics predict that the African American community may back the African American candidates not backed by the Task Force.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/25/1986
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that many African American legislators are opposed to the adoption of the latest version of the state budget proposed by the Ways and Means Committee of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Vaillancourt reviews the proposed budget, which includes cuts in rental assistance and welfare assistance. The budget also includes cuts to the Department of Social Services and the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination. Interview with State Rep. Shirley Owens Hicks, State Rep. Byron Rushing, and Louis Elisa of the Boston chapter of the NAACP at a breakfast meeting of the Massachusetts Legislative Black Caucus. Owens Hicks and Elisa talk about the need for funding of human services. Rushing says that many voters are not opposed to new taxes to fund human services. Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee Richard Volk talks about the proposed budget in the chambers of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Maureen Hart Hennessey of the Norman Rockwell Museum and African Americans in the paintings of Norman Rockwell
1:00:11: Visual: Shots of a breakfast meeting of the Black Caucus. Shots of attendees at the breakfast including Byron Rushing (State Representative). Meg Vaillancourt reports that African American legislators are concerned about the adoption of the budget proposed by the Ways and Means Committee of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Vaillancourt notes that African American legislators are concerned about cuts to specific areas of the budget. V: Footage of Shirley Owens Hicks (State Representative) saying that cuts to the budget will affect the poor; that many people depend on the services provided by state agencies. Vaillancourt reports that Richard Volk (Chairman, House Ways and Means Committee) unveiled a budget which cuts $582 million from the budget proposed by Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts); that the budget includes no new taxes. V: Shot of Volk in the House chambers. Volk stands at a podium to explain the proposed budget. On-screen text details some of the cuts included in the budget proposed by the House Ways and Means Committee. Vaillancourt reports that the House Ways and Means budget includes an $8.5 million decrease in rental assistance and a $12 million decrease in emergency welfare assistance. Vaillancourt notes that the budget cuts $6 million from the Department of Social Services; that the budget cuts $20,000 from the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD). Vaillancourt reports that the House Ways and Means budget increases spending on AIDS prevention, elder services, and drug treatment. V: Footage of Rushing saying that the House Ways and Means budget did not cut some areas; that the budget increased spending in other areas. Rushing says that the House Ways and Means Committee proposed spending more money on drug treatment than Dukakis did. Shot of the Massachusetts State House. Vaillancourt reports that legislators are aware of the popular revolt against new taxes; that the minority community may be more receptive to the governor's call for new taxes. V: Footage of Rushing being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Rushing says that his constituents favor new taxes; that many voters all over the state probably favor new taxes. Rushing says that many state representatives are not listening to their constituents. Footage of Owens-Hicks being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Owens-Hicks if she will vote for new taxes. Owens-Hicks says that she is not opposed to some elements of the new tax package; that she supports a capital gains tax; that she is not opposed to cigarette or alcohol taxes. Owens-Hicks says that she will not endorse a gasoline tax. Footage of Louis Elisa (Boston chapter of the NAACP) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Elisa says that every citizen of the Commonwealth needs to reaffirm their commitment to human services and to their neighbors. Elisa says that the state legislators cannot play politics when there are lives at stake.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/24/1989
Description: Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) and W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia). The city of Hartford, Connecticut has elected Carrie Perry, an African American woman, as mayor of the city. Marcus Jones notes that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. Jones' report includes footage of Perry at a polling station and at a press conference. Jones reports that Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) is seen as having the best chance at becoming Boston's first African American mayor. Interview with Bolling, who says that he might run for mayor someday, but that he is concentrating on his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling differed with Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston in 1983) and other African American community leaders over the issue of Roxbury's secession from Boston. Footage of Bolling, King, Andrew Young (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) and Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) on the Phil Donahue Show in 1986. Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor. Interviews with Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) about the chances of Boston electing an African American mayor.
1:00:09: Visual: Shots of Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) celebrating his victory at the polls; of W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia); of an African American man official from the campaign of Carrie Perry in Hartford. Shot of Carrie Perry (Mayor of Hartford) entering a polling booth. Marcus Jones reports that Carrie Perry is the first African American to be mayor of Hartford; that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. V: Footage of Perry at a press conference. Footage of Bruce Bolling (President, Boston City Council) being interviewed by Jones. Bolling says that the city of Hartford deserves a lot of credit; that Hartford voters have looked beyond race in electing city officials. Jones reports that Bolling is seen as having the best chance of becoming Boston's first African American mayor. V: Footage of Bolling saying that he is not preoccupied with the thought of running for mayor. Bolling says that he is pursuing his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling was once seen as a successor to Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston in 1983); that King and Bolling differed publicly on the issue of Roxbury's proposed secession from Boston. V: Shot of King campaigning in Roxbury in 1983. Footage of Bolling, King, Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Andrew Jones (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) on the Phil Donahue show on October 30, 1986. Bolling says that African Americans and voters from other races supported King's candidacy in 1983 because they wanted a change in the city. Footage of Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) saying that there will be an African American mayor in Boston; that the African American mayor will need to be the mayor for all residents, not just African Americans. Jones notes that the Black Political Task Force endorsed Bolling's last bid for re-election to the City Council. V: Footage of Weeks saying that whites are becoming more accustomed to seeing African Americans in positions of authority; that an African American will eventually become mayor of Boston. Footage of Bolling saying that it is possible that he might become mayor someday. Bolling adds that an African American will become mayor of Boston in the future. Footage of African American audience members debating on the Donahue show. Marcus Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/04/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the emergence of African American elected officials in the predominantly white suburbs of Boston. Gretchen Underwood was elected to the Wellesley Town Meeting as a member of the recently formed Wellesley African American Coalition. The coalition was formed after an incident of harassment in Wellesley involving Dee Brown of the Boston Celtics. Virginia Nelson placed second out of fourteen candidates in the Milton elections. Selectman Charles McKenney will become the chairman of the Ayer Board of Selectmen next year. Interview with Underwood and Nelson about their experiences as African American elected officials in the suburbs. Underwood talks about African American political action groups in other suburbs. Jones's report is accompanied by footage of McKenney and footage of the towns of Wellesley and Milton. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Carmen Fields interviews Libertarian candidate Richard Boddie
0:59:31: Visual Shots of Charles McKenney (Selectman, town of Ayer); of Gretchen Underwood (Wellesley Town Meeting Member); of Virginia Nelson (Milton Town Meeting Member). Shots of McKenney, Underwood and Nelson each being interviewed by Marcus Jones (WGBH reporter). Jones reports that McKenney, Underwood, and Nelson are all town officials; that the three are part of a surprising emergence of black power in the suburbs. V: Footage of Underwood being interviewed by Jones. Underwood says that Wellesley was no different than other places where she could have campaigned. Underwood says that some people were offended because she campaigned as "a candidate of difference." Underwood says that she wanted to put the issue out in front for voters; that she was running for office because of the issue. Shots of downtown Wellesley, MA. Jones reports that Dee Brown (Celtics basketball player) was harassed in Wellesley in September of 1990; that the incident awakened Wellesley's African American community. Jones reports that Brown was mistaken for a robbery suspect while house-hunting in Wellesley; that the incident embarassed the town. Jones notes that the Brown incident was a catalyst for bringing frustrated African Americans in Wellesley together. V: Shot of Underwood walking with Jones in front of a home in Wellesley. Footage of Underwood being interviewed. Underwood says that the Brown incident brought the issue to everyone's attention at the same time. Underwood says that most African Americans in Wellesley have experienced individual acts of discrimination. Underwood says that the Brown incident forced the town to have an open Selectmen's meeting; that a number of African Americans spoke out at the meeting. Underwood says that the meeting brought the African American residents together. Jones reports that the Wellesley African American Coalition was founded after the Brown incident; that Underwood ran for the position of Town Meeting Member with the support of the coalition. Jones notes that Underwood is an administrator at Brookline High School. V: Shots of Underwood exiting the front doors of Brookline High School; of Underwood walking on a path outside of the school. Jones reports that thirteen seats were open; that Underwood placed fourteenth in the election. Jones notes that Underwood was appointed to a seat when one of the Town Meeting Members resigned. Jones reports that Nelson placed second out of fourteen candidates in an election in Milton. V: Shot of Nelson and Jones walking through the lobby of a corporate office. Footage of Nelson being interviewed by Jones. Nelson says that minorities need to have a voice in town affairs. Jones asks Nelson if she is putting the town government on notice. Nelson says that she is letting her presence be known to the town; that she will speak out for minorites and other groups. Nelson says that she is not only representing minorities. Jones reports that the death of Charles Hardison (Milton teenager) made Nelson realize the need for African Americans to be active in town government. V: Shots of a sign for Milton; of the exterior of the Milton Town Office building. Footage of Nelson being interviewed by Jones. Nelson says that everyone should exercise their voices; that African American residents pay their taxes; that African American residents should be represented in the town government. Nelson says that she hopes that other residents of color will become active. Jones reports that all of these African American town officials see their involvement as the beginning of a new activism. Jones reports that McKenney is in line to become the highest-ranking African American town official in Massachusetts. Jones notes that McKenney will become the chairman of Ayer's Board of Selectmen next year. V: Shot of McKenney speaking with another man on the steps of the Post Office in Ayer. Jones notes that Nelson is running for a seat of the Milton School Committee. V: Shot of Nelson talking to Jones in the lobby of a corporate office. Jones reports that Underwood says that African Americans in Foxboro, Wayland, and Southborough are talking about forming political action groups in their towns. V: Shot of Underwood and Jones walking through the yard of a house in Wellesley. Footage of Underwood being interviewed by Jones. Underwood says that African Americans are prepared to take an active role in town government; that African Americans are ready to pay their "dues." Underwood says that African Americans are going to keep running for office. Shot of the Wellesley Town Hall.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/22/1991
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Jesse Jackson traveled to Iraq and Kuwait last weekend in order to interview Saddam Hussein. Jackson traveled to Iraq as a journalist, but also managed to secured the release of US citizens trapped in the US embassy in Kuwait. Jones' report includes footage from Inside Edition of Jackson's meeting with Hussein and his return from Iraq. Interview with Urban Update producer Alicia Hilliard about media coverage of the Persian Gulf crisis and the minority perspective on the Persian Gulf crisis.
1:00:06: Visual: Footage from the TV show Inside Edition, including Inside Edition graphics. Shots of Jesse Jackson (African-American political leader) in Iraq; of Jackson on a plane; of Jackson exiting the plane. Shot of Jackson entering a building. Marcus Jones reports that Jackson was identified as a reporter on the TV news magazine Inside Edition. Jones reports that Jackson traveled to Iraq and Kuwait last weekend; that Jackson's activities were not those of a conventional journalist. V: Footage from Inside Edition. Jackson meets with Saddam Hussein (Iraqi leader). The two men speak through a translator. Jackson and Hussein talk about women and children who will return to the US with Jackson. Jones reports that Jackson interviewed Hussein; that Jackson secured the release of US citizens trapped in the US embassy in Kuwait. V: Shots of a US family; of Jackson standing with the US family. Jones reports that Jackson was treated as a welcome guest; that Jackson responded in kind. V: Footage from Inside Edition. Shots of a Iraqi man in military uniform. Shot of Jackson greeting a security guard on the other side of a glass window. Shots of Jackson at the airport with US citizens who traveled with him from Kuwait. The media takes photographs. Shots of two girls greeting a relative at the airport. Jones reports that a Wall Street Journal/NBC poll shows that most African Americans approve of Jackson's direct and personal approach to resolving the Persian Gulf Crisis. Jones notes that the same poll shows that most white Americans believe that a show of US military might will resolve the crisis. V: Shots of Jackson meeting with Hussein; of Hussein during the meeting. Footage of Alicia Hilliard (producer, Urban Update) being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks about the minority perspective on the Persian Gulf Crisis. Hilliard says that African Americans may sympathize with Kuwaitis and Iraqis because Kuwaitis and Iraqis are people of color. Hilliard wonders whether African American and other minority US soldiers will feel comfortable shooting at Kuwaitis and Iraqis. Hilliard says that the mainstream media ignores this angle. Jones reports that Hilliard is the producer of Urban Update on WHDH; that Urban Update focuses on minority issues and perspectives. Jones reports that Hilliard says that the mainstream media has ignored the minority perspective on the crisis. V: Footage of CBS Evening News coverage of the Persian Gulf Crisis. Shot of Dan Rather (CBS News anchor) reading the news. Footage of Hilliard being interviewed by Jones. Hilliard says that the media is not sensitive to those who differ from the norm. Hilliard says that "people do not relate to people who are different." Jones reports that Jackson counts himself among the minority of African Americans who support Bush's military build-up in the Persian Gulf. V: Footage of Jackson being interviewed on the set of Inside Edition. Jackson says that war becomes inevitable if talking is impossible. Inside Edition graphics and closing credits.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/04/1990
Description: Senator Edward Brooke concedes the Senate race to Paul Tsongas in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. With him on the stage are supporters including State Sen. William Owens, his mother Helen Brooke, community leader Elma Lewis, and campaign field director Thomas Trimarco. Sharon Stevens reports from behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech; Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage, waiting to interview Brooke after the speech. Brooke thanks the crowd, his family, and his campaign staff. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat and that he continues to support full equality and justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator and assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke shakes hands and answers questions from the press as he slowly makes his way off stage surrounded by an entourage. B-roll of Brooke supporters in ballroom after the speech.
0:58:17: Visual: Shot of Edward Brooke (US Senator) at a podium, waving to a cheering crowd in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. A large campaign banner behind him reads, "Brooke - United States Senator." William Owens (State Senator), Helen Brooke (Edward Brooke's mother), Elma Lewis (African American community leader), Thomas Trimarco (field director for Brooke's campaign) and other supporters are all on stage with Brooke. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) stands behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech. 0:59:15: V: Brooke thanks the crowd, which continues to cheer for him. Brooke says that preliminary results show Paul Tsongas (candidate for US Senator) to be the victor. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat. Brooke thanks his campaign workers and contributors for their support. Brooke notes that there are US Senators who will continue to fight for senior citizens, minorities, the poor, and the handicapped. Brooke says that he continues to support full equality for women and equal justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator. Brooke assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke says that he leaves the Senate with the feeling that there is much left to be accomplished; that he remains committed to the causes he has supported. Brooke paraphrases Lillian Hellman, saying that "I could never cut my consciensce to fit the fashion of any year." Brooke commends his supporters for their hard work, faith and courage. Brooke thanks his family, his campaign manager, John Volpe (chairman of Brooke's campaign committee), and Trimarco. Brooke says that he regrets not having spent enough time with the voters of Massachusetts during the campaign. He notes that his Senate responsibilities kept him in Washington D.C. during much of the campaign. Brooke says that he wishes Tsongas well; that he is sorry he did not deliver a victory for his campaign workers and supporters. Brooke says that he is very happy that a woman has been elected to the US Senate. He jokes about going out to look for a job and wishes his supporters well. 1:09:35: V: Brooke shakes hands with members of the crowd. Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage with a microphone, waiting to interview Brooke. The crowd continues to clap for Brooke. Stevens recaps Brooke's speech. Brooke is still on the stage, talking to members of the media. The crowd remains on the floor. 1:11:11: V: Brooke remains on the stage. He waves to supporters. Members of the media surround him. He answers questions about the race and his future plans. A jazz band plays and the noise of the crowd is audible. Brooke attempts to move off of the stage. The media continue to surround him. Brooke waves at the crowd as he moves slowly off the stage. Flashbulbs go off as the media take his photograph. 1:15:51: V: Shot of a sign reading, "We still love you Ed. You're the best.". Shots of campaign supporters on the floor; of members of the crowd. Shots of the media and their equipment in the corner of the room. Members of the crowd mill about in the ballroom. Shot of the jazz band playing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1978
Description: Senator Edward Brooke holds a press conference at the offices of Robert McGrath (attorney for Edward Brooke) to address a story about his personal finances that appeared in the Boston Globe. Brooke admits to making a false statement about the receipt of a personal loan in an out-of-court deposition for his divorce. Brooke says that he did not commit perjury by making a "misstatement" in the divorce proceedings; that he did not inflate his financial liability in the divorce settlement. Brooke discusses the divorce settlement and says that it is "fair and equitable." Brooke denies allegations by the Boston Globe that he spends more than he earns. Brooke describes the sources of his income, including details of the purchases and estimated values of his properties. Brooke apologizes to constituents and asks for their forgiveness and understanding. The media asks probing questions about his personal life and finances. Brooke admits that his daughter is responsible for leaking the story to the press.
11:27:58: Visual: Members of the media are gathered in a small room at the offices of Robert McGrath (attorney for Edward Brooke). The media waits for the arrival of Edward Brooke (US Senator). Members of the press are crowded into the small room. Some are sitting and some are standing. Camera crews set up cameras and microphones. Walt Sanders (WBZ) is among the reporters. 11:30:19: V: Brooke arrives and stands at the front of the room. McGrath stands at his side. Brooke says that the story in The Boston Globe about his personal finances is mostly correct. He notes that there was an error in the caption. Brooke says that he has never admitted to swearing falsely about a $49,000 loan. Brooke apologizes for making a "misstatement and a mistake." He asks for forgiveness and understanding from his constituents. Brooke admits that he never received a $49,000 loan from A. Raymond Tye (Boston liquor wholesaler). He adds that he made a false statement about the receipt of the loan in an out of court deposition for his divorce case. Brooke says that he does owe $49,000; that $2,000 is owed to Tye; that the remaining money belonged to his mother-in-law; that the money was in his control and spent according to the wishes of his mother-in-law. Brooke adds that his divorce is a private matter; that he does not want to discuss the $47,000 debt; that the debt is a family matter. Brooke notes that the out of court deposition was never signed; that McGrath and Monroe Inker (attorney for Brooke's wife) stated in the deposition that the debt was a matter to be settled privately. Brooke states that the depositions were never entered into court. He apologizes for having made a misstatement about the loan. 11:34:57: V: A reporter asks Brooke about allegations that he has been spending more than he has earned. Brooke says that those allegations in The Boston Globe story are untrue; that he has never spent more money than he has earned. Brooke adds that he made rough estimates of his living expenses in a financial statement for the divorce; that his income is comprised of his salary, honoraria received from speaking engagements, stocks, and rental fees from his properties on St. Martin and Martha's Vineyard. Brooke discusses details of the purchases and estimated values of his properties on Martha's Vineyard and St. Martin, his home in Newton, and his apartment in Washington D.C. Brooke notes that he bought his home in Newton with funds realized from the sale of his first home in Roxbury. He adds that he is regularly paying off a $125,000 loan which he received to pay for the property in St. Martin; that he is also paying a mortgage on his apartment in Washington D.C. Brooke says that he has no cash and securities holdings, despite reports to the contrary by The Boston Globe. Brooke notes that he has one checking account from which he pays all of his bills. He says that he would like to put an end to rumors about his "vast holdings." Brooke adds that there is nothing wrong with making a profit from a "sane" investment in real estate. 11:39:16: V: A reporter asks Brooke if he committed perjury in making a "misstatement" in the divorce proceedings. Brooke says that he did not commit perjury; that he admitted under oath to owing $49,000; that he misstated the party to whom he owed the money. The reporter insists that Brooke committed perjury by saying that he owed all of the money to Tye. Brooke insists that he did not commit perjury; that he stated the correct amount of money owed; that he said the money was owed to Tye in order to avoid bringing a private family matter into the court settlement. The reporter asks if his misstatement inflated his financial liability in the divorce settlement. Brooke says that he had always intended to pay back the money; that he had spent the money for his family with his mother-in-law's consent; that he did not inflate his liability because he was obligated to pay back the money. Brooke notes that his wife knew about the debt to his mother-in-law; that the debt did not affect the settlement. Brooke adds that the settlement gave his wife their home in Newton and the property in St. Martin as well as an annual alimony payment of $18,000 and all health and medical insurance. Brooke explains that he has assumed all mortgage payments for the property in St. Martin given to his wife in the settlement; that the divorce settlement was fair and equitable. Brooke says that divorce settlements are very painful; that he does not know how The Boston Globe gained access to the depositions; that he has never read the depositions. Brooke says that he wants to clarify the facts surrounding the divorce settlement because of inaccuracies in the story by The Boston Globe. Brooke says that he thinks his constituents will forgive him; that he has a strong record of public service. Brooke says that his mistakes in the divorce proceedings were not related to public funds or to his performance as US Senator. Brooke adds that he has never tried to cheat his wife; that he has never received any money through dishonest means. Brooke says that he will not take legal action against The Boston Globe; that their story was substantially correct. Brooke notes that he never admitted to falsely swearing about his finances under oath, as was reported in the Globe. Brooke says again that he made a "mistake and a misstatement." Brooke says that the depositions were not provided to the Globe by him or his attorney; that the depositions must have been provided by his wife or her attorney; that the depositions were never filed in court; that he never read them; that they exist for the sole purpose of reaching a financial agreement in the divorce settlement. A reporter asks Brooke if someone has "an axe to grind" about the settlement. Brooke says that someone peddled this story to the news media all over the state of Massachusetts and in Washington D.C.; that the release of the story coincides with his bid for reelection to the US Senate; that he feels like he is being "blackmailed." Brooke says that he thinks the story is being used in an attempt to force him to give up more to his wife in the divorce settlement. Brooke notes that he has given "three-fourths" of his assets to his wife in the settlement; that the settlement is fair and equitable. Brooke admits that his daughter, Remi, is responsible for leaking the story to the media. A reporter asks Brooke if his mother-in-law "holds the note" to the personal debt. Brooke responds that there is no note. Brooke explains that his mother-in-law received an insurance settlement of $100,000 from a car accident which left her paraplegic. Brooke says that this money was spent according to the wishes of his mother-in-law; that she gave him control of this money; that much of this money was spent on her doctor's bills and expenses; that he has been paying this money back and owes about $30,000. A reporter notes that Brooke sponsored legislation forcing full financial disclosure from US Senators. Brooke says that he has always fought against corruption in government; that full financial disclosure by US Senators is ethically important. A reporter asks Brooke if he has received a "bum rap." Brooke says no.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/26/1978
Description: Visuals related to the district attorney's inquiry into the finances and divorce case of Senator Edward Brooke. Shots include court drawings, newspaper headlines, and articles from The Boston Globe, photographs of A. Raymond Tye (Boston liquor wholesaler) and Brooke, and the typed cover of the district attorney's inquiry.
1:54:07: Visual: Shots of court drawings relating to an inquiry into the divorce case of Edward Brooke (US Senator). The drawings include Brooke sitting in the courtroom, lawyers approaching the judge's bench and testimony being given. 1:56:50: V: Shot of newspaper articles and headlines about the Brooke case. One Boston Globe article has a headline reading, "Brooke admits to swearing falsely on $49,000 loan." Another article includes a photo of A. Raymond Tye (Boston liquor wholesaler). 1:57:44: V: Shot of the typed cover page of the district attorney's inquiry into the Brooke divorce case. 1:58:32: V: Shot of another court drawing related to the inquiry into the Brooke divorce case. The drawing shows the judge sitting at the bench. The stenographer is seated in front of the judge. The lawyers stand in the courtroom. 1:59:24: V: Shots of the front page of The Boston Globe from Tuesday, August 22, 1978. A headline reads, "Brooke case: Fraud found, he's cleared. Medicaid to in-law held illegal by state panel." 2:00:39: V: Shots of a still photo of Brooke.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/22/1978
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson has challenged Michael Dukakis to come out with a budget for his proposed domestic programs, during a campaign debate. Dukakis has refused to release a budget so far. Interview with Issues Dirextor for the Dukakis campaign, Christopher Edley, who says that Dukakis is an experienced chief executive and that he does not need to release a budget during a presidential campaign. Vaillancourt reviews Dukakis's proposals on day care, affordable housing, and drugs. She notes that he has not talked about a budget for these proposals. Interview with community activist and Jackson supporter Mel King, who also supports Jackson in his demand for Dukakis's budget. Dukakis has talked about funding for his education proposals and for his "Rebuild America" proposal. Vaillancourt reviews Dukakis' budget priorities and notes that he would fund increases in domestic funding through cuts in the defense budget. Vaillancourt reviews the events of Dukakis's first term as Governor of Massachusetts. She notes that a massive state debt forced Dukakis to raise taxes and cut spending.
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) and Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential candidate) at Steel Valley Debate in Pennsylvania. Jackson says that "Reaganomics" must be reversed. The audience applauds. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has challenged Dukakis to come up with a budget detailing which domestic programs need support and how Dukakis would pay for them. Vaillancourt notes that Dukakis has stuck to his own script; that he has refused to enter into a budget battle with Jackson. V: Footage of Dukakis at the debate. Dukakis says that partnerships between Washington DC, management, and labor need to be built. Vaillancourt reports that public-private partnerships are the key to Dukakis's domestic programs. V: On-screen visuals and text detail Dukakis's positions on day care, affordable housing, and drugs. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis has called for "'a national partnership to create affordable day care for all'"; that Dukakis's position paper carries no price tag for his day care program. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis supports a reallocation of money to build more affordable housing; that Dukakis's position paper carries no price tag for the affordable housing program. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis would fight drugs by restoring funds to the Coast Guard and to other enforcement measures; that Dukakis's position paper carries no price tag for his anti-drug program. V: Shot of Jackson at the campaign debate. Footage of Christopher Edley (Issues Director for the Dukakis campaign) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Edley says that Dukakis is an experienced chief executive; that Dukakis has put together ten balanced budgets in his tenure as Governor of Massachusetts. Edley says that an electoral campaign is not the time to put together a budget. Footage of Mel King (Jackson supporter) saying that the voters need to know about Dukakis's priorities; that voters need to know where Dukakis will find the money to implement his programs. Vaillancourt notes that Dukakis has talked about the budgets for two of his programs. V: Shots of Dukakis and Jackson at the campaign debate. On-screen text and visuals detail Dukakis's positions on job creation and education. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis's "'Rebuild America'" program would "invest $500 million from federal government to regional development." Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis supports increasing the education budget by $250 million in his first year. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson would raise taxes on corporations and the wealthy to pay for his domestic programs; that Dukakis would like to generate additional money by cracking down on tax cheats and by making the government more efficient. V: Shots of Dukakis and Jackson at the campaign debate. On-screen text and visuals detail Dukakis's budget priorities. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis will "finance all new domestic spending through cuts in Star Wars." V: Shot of King being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Footage of Dukakis speaking at a press conference in 1974. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis promised no new taxes in his first campaign for governor of Massachusetts in 1974; that the massive state debt forced him to raise taxes and to cut spending. V: Footage of King being interviewed by Vaillancourt. King says that Dukakis has not learned the lesson of 1974; that Dukakis has not honored his commitments to meet the needs of people on welfare. King says that voters need to know where the money will come from for his programs. Vaillancourt notes that Dukakis probably does not want to quote specifics in order to avoid becoming the captive of special interest groups. V: Shot of Dukakis at the campaign debate. Footage from C-Span of Walter Mondale (1984 Democratic US Presidential candidate). Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis has avoided giving Jackson specifics outside of the areas of job creation and welfare reform; that Dukakis has left himself room to maneuver in the general election.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1988
Description: Christopher Lydon interviews in-studio guests Howie Carr (columnist, The Boston Herald) and Byron Rushing (State Representative) about the murder of Carol Stuart in Mission Hill. Carr talks about criticism received by the Boston Herald for running a brutal photograph of the murder. Rushing and Carr talk about how to solve the problem of violence on the streets. Rushing accuses city officials of making policy "based on frustration." He adds that the government must focus on the root of the problem. Rushing and Carr talk about class and race issues surrounding media response to the murder. Rushing says that education and community development will help to stop violence on the streets.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/25/1989
Description: Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm speaks to an audience about the evils of racism in America. Silent footage of the audience and of Chisholm at the podium. Chisholm continues her speech, saying that Americans need to address racism and work passed the commonly held stereotypes, following the example of the younger generations.
Collection: WHDH
Date Created: 04/20/1970
Description: David Boeri reports that Senator Edward Kennedy took a cruise on a Coast Guard boat to Little Brewster Island in Boston Harbor. Little Brewster Island is the site of a lighthouse that was repaired with funds procured by Kennedy from the federal government. Funding for the Coast Guard has been cut by the federal government, resulting in closed facilities and fewer patrols. Interview with Robert Johanson, Rear Admiral of the US Coast Guard, about the budget cuts. Kennedy and Jesse Jackson have called for a restoration of funds to the Coast Guard. Coast Guard patrols can stem the flow of drugs into the US. Jackson talks about the Coast Guard. Kennedy on Little Brewster Island.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Edward Kennedy (US Senator) shaking hands with a Coast Guard officer on board a boat. Shot of a Coast Guard boat cruising in Boston Harbor. Shot of Kennedy with a cigar, walking toward the lighthouse on Little Brewster Island. Shots of the lighthouse. Shots of the Boston skyline from Little Brewster Island. David Boeri reports that Kennedy took a boat cruise with a crew of Coast Guard officers and reporters; that Kennedy was trying to draw attention to his legislative record on Boston Harbor; that the boat brought Kennedy to visit the lighthouse on Little Brewster Island in Boston Harbor. Boeri notes that the lighthouse was repaired with funds from an amendment that Kennedy tacked on to an appropriations bill two years ago. Boeri notes that the the lighthouse marks the entrance to Boston harbor; that the lighthouse is still operational. Boeri adds that other lighthouses have been closed recently. V: Footage of Kennedy on Little Brewster Island. Kennedy says that light stations have been closed for budgetary reasons; that reduced services are the result of budget-tightening measures. Boeri reports from Little Brewster Island. The lighthouse is visible behind him. Boeri reports that Ronald Reagan (US President) and the Congress made cuts in the Coast Guard budget in 1988; that the Coast Guard has closed facilities. Boeri adds that the Coast Guard is running fewer patrols as a result of cuts in the budget for fuels, parts, and maintenance. Boeri reports that search and rescue patrols and fisheries enforcement patrols have been eliminated. V: Shot of a Coast Guard boat in Boston Harbor. Footage of Robert Johanson (Rear Admiral, US Coast Guard) saying that the Coast Guard has cut back on law enforcement patrols; that an increase in drug trafficking could be the result. Shot of a Coast Guard officer driving a boat. Boeri reports that the cuts in law enforcement patrols have provoked some to call for a restoration of money to the Coast Guard budget. V: Footage of Jesse Jackson from October 5, 1987. Jackson says that the Coast Guard needs to be stronger; that the Coast Guard can prevent the flow of drugs to the US. Footage of Kennedy on Little Brewster Island. Kennedy calls for a restoration of money to the Coast Guard budget. Boeri reports that Kennedy has called for Congress to transfer an additional $60 million to the Coast Guard budget. Shot of the Boston skyline from Little Brewster Island.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/04/1988
Description: Christy George reports that the campaigns of Jesse Jackson and Michael Dukakis have different agendas for the upcoming Democratic convention. She notes that Jackson may not support Dukakis's choice of running mate because he would like to be named as Dukakis's running mate. George reports that Jackson has threatened to have floor fights on all platform issues that he does not win, and to present his speech outside of the convention if he feels slighted by the party. George speculates on whether the delegates for each candidate will unite at the convention. Interview with Dukakis delegate Raymond Jordan and Jackson delegate Saundra Graham about their views of the convention. Jordan says that he is working to unite all Democrats behind Dukakis. Graham says that Dukakis must accommodate Jackson's platform to win his delegates. George's report includes footage of Dukakis and Sen. Lloyd Bentsen at a press conference and footage of Dukakis campaigning. George's report also features footage of Jackson and footage of Sen. Dianne Feinstein at the 1984 Democratic National Convention. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: An African American family moves into the McCormack housing project
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Raymond Jordan (Dukakis delegate) being interviewed by Christy George. Jordan says that he is working to unite all Democrats behind the nomination of Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential candidate). Footage of Saundra Graham (Jackson delegate) saying that Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) has broken the barrier which had kept people of color from running for elected offices. George reports that the Jackson campaign and the Dukakis campaign have different agendas for the Democratic Convention in Atlanta next week. V: C-Span footage from the 1984 Democratic National Convention. Dianne Feinstein (US Senator) urges the members of the Democratic Party to put aside their differences in order to work for their goals. Shot of Democratic leaders including Jackson shaking hands at the the Convention. Shots of construction workers preparing the set and stage for the 1988 Democratic National Convention. George reports that Jackson may not support Dukakis's choice of running mate; that Jackson wants to be Dukakis's running mate. V: Shot of Dukakis and Lloyd Bentsen (US Senator) at a press conference. Footage of Jordan saying that Dukakis supporters are going to the convention to support Dukakis. Footage of Graham saying that Dukakis needs to accomodate Jackson supporters. George reports that Jackson is threatening floor fights on all 13 platform issues that he does not win. V: Shot of Jackson speaking from a podium. Footage of Jordan saying that Dukakis has done everything he can to accomodate Jackson on the platform issues. Footage of Graham saying that she is going to the convention to fight for the issues which are important to her and her constituents. George reports that Jackson is threatening to give his speech outside of the convention hall if he feels mistreated by the Democratic Party leadership. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the 1984 Democratic Convention. Shot of the audience. Footage of Jordan saying that Jackson's attitude is "political posturing." Jordan says that no one knows what Jackson's real motives are. Footage of Graham saying that Dukakis is acting unreasonably; that Dukakis is trying to control the convention rules and the party platform. George speculates as to whether Jackson supporters and Dukakis supporters will unite at the convention. V: Shots of Dukakis standing at the shore of a lake; of Jackson addressing a small crowd; of the convention set being constructed in the Atlanta convention center. Footage of Graham saying that Jackson needs to urge his supporters to support Dukakis as the Democratic nominee. Footage of Jordan saying that Jackson supporters and Dukakis supporters both want the Democratic nominee to win the presidency. George notes that the convention could be boring if both sides unite immediately behind one candidate and one platform.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/11/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Michael Dukakis is the frontrunner among the Democratic presidential candidates after faring well in the Super Tuesday primary elections. Dukakis did well in the Southern states because he had money to travel and to buy advertising time. Jesse Jackson won the African American vote and some votes from southern whites. Vaillancourt discusses the performances of Democratic candidates Al Gore, Dick Gephardt, and Paul Simon. She notes that Gore did better than analysts had predicted. Vaillancourt analyzes the candidates' chances in the upcoming Illinois primary election. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Dukakis campaigning, footage of Dukakis speaking to the media and footage from a Dukakis campaign advertisement. Vaillancourt's report is also accompanied by footage of Jackson campaigning, by footage of Gore campaigning and by footage of Gephardt and Simon. Vaillancourt's report features footage from a Gephardt campaign advertisement and footage of Dukakis with Walter Mondale.
1:00:14: Visual: Footage of Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential candidate) speaking to reporters. Kitty Dukakis (wife of Michael Dukakis) stands next to him. Dukakis says, "It's a fight for delegates." Shot of Dukakis exiting a voting booth and posing for reporters with Kitty Dukakis. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis is the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination after the Super Tuesday primaries; that Dukakis did better in the South than political analysts had predicted. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis targeted districts in which he thought he could do well; that Dukakis focused on states in which he could pick up bonus delegates. Vaillancourt notes that Dukakis's political organization allowed him to compete in the twenty states holding primaries on Super Tuesday; that Dukakis has raised a lot of money to buy advertising time and to travel. V: Footage from a 1988 campaign advertisement for Dukakis. Shots of Dukakis campaigning during the 1988 primary season. Footage of Dukakis speaking to reporters. Dukakis says that he will focus on the Illinois primary next. Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) won the African American vote as well as votes from southern whites. V: Shot of Jackson surrounded by media and supporters. Jackson picks up a young girl. He gives a thumbs-up sign to the crowd. Shots of Jackson speaking to supporters. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson's success may be worrisome for the Democratic Party. V: Footage of Dukakis saying that Jackson is a "formidable competitor." Vaillancourt reports that Al Gore (Democratic US Presidential candidate) did better in the South than political analysts has predicted. V: Shots of Gore and Tipper Gore (wife of Gore) visiting a factory. Gore shakes hands with workers. Vaillancourt reports that Gore sees Dukakis as his main competitor for the Democratic nomination. Vaillancourt notes that Gore has been comparing Dukakis' candidacy with that of Walter Mondale (1984 Democratic US Presidential candidate). V: Shot of Dukakis shaking hands with Mondale at a campaign rally in 1984. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson and Paul Simon (Democratic US Presidential candidate) are well known in Illinois; that Gore is not. V: Shots of Gore; of Jackson; of Simon; of Dukakis. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis has been organizing his campaign in Illinois since October. Vaillancourt notes that Gore is telegenic. Vaillancourt adds that Gore hopes to have success in the North, like Gary Hart (1984 Democratic US Presidential candidate) did in 1984. V: Shots of Gore and Tipper Gore exiting a building; of Hart campaigning in 1984; of Gore speaking at a podium. Vaillancourt reports that Dick Gephardt (Democratic US Presidential candidate) did not do well in the South. V: Shot of Gephardt at a campaign rally. Footage from 1988 Gephardt political advertisement. The political advertisement attacks Dukakis. Vaillancourt notes that Gephardt was hurt by his own political advertisements attacking Dukakis; that Gephardt has had difficulty raising funds. V: Shot of Gephardt with supporters. Vaillancourt notes that there is speculation that Gephardt will skip the Illinois primary. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis is already in Illinois. V: Footage of Dukakis saying that he has a good chance of winning some delegates in Illinois. Shot of Dukakis getting into a car. Supporters and the media surround the car.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that a poll by The Boston Globe found that African American residents do not think that African American politicians are providing strong leadership for the community. Interviews with African American residents David Reddick, Evangeline Josey, and Joe King about African American leadership. Jones reports that Donald Polk (Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts) does not believe that the Boston Globe poll is a good measure of the effectiveness of the African American leadership. Interview with Polk who says it is easy to criticize the leadership. He adds that residents need to get more involved in the activities of the community. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) on the Phil Donahue show in October of 1986.
1:00:20: Visual: Footage of David Reddick (South End resident) being interviewed by Marcus Jones. Reddick says that he is no longer happy with the leaders of the African American community. Shots of African American residents walking on street. Jones reports that The Boston Globe released results of a poll about leadership in the African American community. V: Shots of a Boston Globe newspaper article with a headline reading, "Black leaders criticize Globe poll on their effectiveness." Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) on the Phil Donahue Show from October, 1986. Bolling says that his efforts and the efforts of Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) have produced significant changes in the city of Boston. Jones reports that the Globe poll found that African American residents do not think that African American politicians are providing strong leadership. V: Footage of Evangeline Josey (Roxbury resident) saying that the politicians need to provide leadership on issues like crime and drugs; that the politicians need to organize the community. Footage of Donald Polk (Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts) saying that the community cannot expect a few people to solve the community's problems. Polk says that Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) could never have emerged as a leader without the efforts of Rosa Parks (civil rights activist). Shots of Polk and Jones walking together on a street. Jones says that Polk does not believe that the Globe poll is a good measure of the effectiveness of African American leaders. V: Footage of Polk saying that people will shoot at a target if given the opportunity; that the Globe poll holds up leaders as targets. Footage of Joe King (Mattapan resident) saying that African American leaders have not provided good leadership. Shots of Jones interviewing Polk; of African American residents on a city street. Jones reports that Polk says that good leaders need good followers. V: Footage of Polk saying that people become leaders when contribute their efforts to an activity or movement. Shot of an African American man exiting the Boston Bank of Commerce.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/15/1988
Description: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature holds a hearing on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation. Bolling says that legislators must guarantee protection and equal rights for all citizens. Suzanne Bumps (State Representative) testifies in favor of legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the its effect on women in the workplace. John Olver (State Senator) and Thomas Vallely (State Representative) testify in favor of the legislation. Vallely says that legislators must fight one of the last remaining civil rights battles by banning discrimination on the grounds of sexual preference. Vallely talks about a proposed amendment barring religious organizations from some aspects of civil rights law; he says that such an amendment is unnecessary. Peter Morin (State Representative) asks Vallely a question about language used in the legislation. Vallely talks about other exceptions granted under the proposed legislation. John Businger (State Representative) testifies in favor of the legislation. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of their civil rights by posting anti-discrimination policy and legislation. George Bachrach (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation.
1:00:00: Visual: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature sits at the front of a room. The committee prepares to hear testimony on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. The room is crowded with audience members and members of the press. Audience members stand and seat themselves on the floor. The committee chairman invites Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) to testify. 1:00:28: V: Bolling thanks the committee members. Bolling notes that the Senate could not vote on this legislation during the previous year; that the vote was held up until the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled on the constitutionality of the legislation. Bolling talks about discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling says that opponents of legislation barring discrimnation on the grounds of sexual orientation have ignored ugly incidents involving discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling makes reference to a television show which depicted the absurdity of society's prejudices against gays and lesbians. Bolling notes that gay and lesbians make up 10% of the population. Bolling says that many citizens will be positively affected by the passage of legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Bolling says that gays and lesbians will be denied equal protection under the law unless this legislation is passed; that there cannot be exceptions to the government's guarantee of equal access to all citizens. Bolling says that the legislators must guarantee protection for all citizens, even if legislators disagree with those citizens' way of life. Bolling says that Massachusetts must be a safe haven from discrimination. Bolling says that this legislation reaffirms the dignity and integrity of our democracy; that legislators must be willing to take risks to assure civil rights for all citizens. Bolling says that legislators must speak out against discrimination in all forms. Bolling reaffirms the right of citizens to live free from fear. Bolling says that he hopes the law will be passed this year. 1:11:11: V: The committee chairman thanks Bolling and calls the next speaker. Suzanne Bump (State Representative from Braintree) speaks on behalf of the Massachusetts Caucus of Women Legislators. She notes that the caucus strongly supports legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the ill effects of sexual harassment on students and female employees. Bump adds that surveys show that 75% to 95% of women have been harassed at some point in their working lives. Bumps says that sexual harassment is a form of sexual discrimination; that sexual harassment is degrading and humiliating to women. Bumps notes that women who quit their jobs because of sexual harassment are unable to collect unemployment benefits. Bumps says that grievance procedures for victims of sexual harassment are non-existant; that victims who complain about sexual harassment often receive little support. Bumps says that sexual harassment is often perpetrated by men in positions of power who go unpunished; that the perpetrators are often the bosses or professors of these women. Bumps notes that federal courts have upheld the use of Title VII of the civil rights act in some sexual harassment cases; that Title VII bars discrimination in the work place; that there are limits to the application of Title VII in sexual harassment cases. Bumps talks about the importance of the current legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps notes that the legislation defines sexual harassment, puts cases of sexual harassment under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and establishes a uniform grievance procedure for cases of sexual harassment within state government. Bumps notes that the legislation allows for the prompt resolution of complaints. She urges legislators to support the bill. 1:15:05: V: The committee chairman thanks Bumps and calls the next speaker. John Olver (State Senator) says that he is testifying as a Democratic state senator and on behalf of the Massachusetts State Democratic Party. Olver urges the Massachusetts state legislature to ban discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Olver says that discrimination against gays and lesbians must be ended in housing, employment, public accomodation, and in the consumer marketplace. Olver thanks the Congressional committee. 1:17:06: V: Tom Vallely (State Representative) speaks to the committee about his support for legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely notes that he has been one of the principal sponsors of this legislation in the Massasachusetts House of Representatives. Vallely reviews the history of the legislation. Vallely notes that the legislation allows for the protection of gays and lesbians under the state civil rights law. Vallely says that legislators are not condoning homosexuality by offering protection for gays and lesbians under the civil rights law; that legislators need to allow citizens a form of redress against widespread discrimination. Vallely notes that this legislation has been debated by the legislature for more than a decade. Vallely says that the debate about the "gay lifestyle" is inappropriate; that the lifestyles of gays and lesbians is the same as the lifestyle of straight people. Vallely says that gays and lesbians are looking for equal protection, not "special treatment." Vallely refers to the controversy about Mark Twain's book, Huckleberry Finn. Vallely says that the book is a moving exploration of discrimination in American society; that the book is not racist. Vallely says that discrimination on the grounds of race or sexual preference is not acceptable in our society; that discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation is one of the "last civil rights battles" to be fought. Vallely says that opponents to the legislation will try to add an amendment exempting religious organizations from some aspects of the civil rights law. Vallely says that this amendment is unnecessary because the separation of church and state already exists. Vallely says that religious groups do not need to be exempted from legislation about the ERA (Equal Rights Amendement) or from legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely offers to speak to the members of the committee individually about why special legislation exempting religious groups from the civil rights law would be a "grave error." Vallely says that the legislation is important and worth the fight to get it passed. 1:25:44: V: Peter Morin (State Representative) asks a question about the language used in the legislation. Morin points out that there is an exemption to the discrimination law in the case of "bona fide occupational qualifications." Vallely says that the exemption grants authority to the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD) to consider the qualifications necessary for a certain occupation before deciding a discrimination case. Vallely says that it is important to give the MCAD some leeway in its decisions; that he cannot name a list of these "occupational qualifications." Vallely thanks the Congressional committee. 1:28:11: V: John Businger (State Representative from Brookline) notes that he has co-sponsored legislation in the Massachusetts House of Representatives barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Businger says that government has a role in protecting its citizens from discrimination and harassment. Businger says that sexual harassment and discrimination against gays and lesbians are "unreasonable" and "arbitrary" forms of harassment. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of this legislation; that he has sponsored a bill to increase the posting requirements for anti-discrimination legislation; that the people affected by the legislation must be well informed in order to take advantage of it. Businger says that anti-discrimination policy and legislation must be posted on applications for credit, for employment, for services and for membership in organizations. Businger urges the legislators to pass this bill so that people can be made aware of their civil rights. Businger urges the legislators to pass the bills barring sexual harassment and discrimination of the basis of sexual orientation. 1:31:29: V: George Bachrach (State Senator) makes a lighthearted joke. The members of the panel laugh. Bachrach says that he is testifying in support of the Senate bill which bars discrimination against gays and lesbians in housing, employment, and credit. Bachrach says that he is sorry that this legislation has not already been passed into law.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/28/1985
Description: Christy George reports that a Los Angeles Times poll shows Michael Dukakis leading the field of candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination. Jesse Jackson is also a strong contender in the wake of candidate Gary Hart's withdrawal from the race. Speaking to the media, Dukakis dismisses the importance of polls. Interview with Bruce Bolling, the co-chair of Jackson's Massachusetts campaign, who says that the Jackson campaign will challenge the notion that a person of color cannot be president. George's report is accompanied by footage of Jackson campaigning, by footage of Dukakis campaigning and by footage of the Dukakis campaign staff at work.
1:00:02: Visual: Shots of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) campaigning on a street corner. Shots of Dukakis shaking hands with voters at a political gathering. Christy George reports that Dukakis was named as the leading candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in a poll by The Los Angeles Times newspaper. George reports that Dukakis does not want to become the "new Gary Hart." George notes that the extra visibility is good for Dukakis' campaign nationwide. V: Footage of Robert Farmer (fundraiser for Dukakis' presidential campaign) in Dukakis's State House offices. George reports that a good showing in the polls can help a candidate's fundraising operation. V: Footage of a smiling Dukakis saying that there are no frontrunners in the race for the Democratic nomination. Shots of Dukakis campaign workers making telephone calls; of campaign signs reading, "Dukakis for president." Shots of campaign workers organizing paperwork and typing; of two men standing in the offices of the Dukakis campaign. George reports that Dukakis takes nothing for granted after losing the 1978 gubernatorial race to Ed King (former governor of Massachusetts) in an upset. V: Shots of campaign workers assembling folders with Dukakis campaign information; of Dukakis walking up the stairs inside the State House. George reports that Dukakis is fourth in a Time magazine poll; that Dukakis is second to Jesse Jackson (candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination) in a Newsweek poll; that Dukakis leads in the poll by the LA Times. V: Footage of Dukakis in his offices, saying that "undecided is number one in the LA Times poll." George notes that Jackson is a strong contender for the nomination. V: Shot of Jackson at a campaign rally. Footage of Bruce Bolling (Co-chair of Jackson's Massachusetts campaign) saying that Dukakis appeals to voters who liked Gary Hart (US Senator); that Jackson could also appeal to those voters. George notes that Bolling is upset that Jackson has not been named as Hart's successor. V: Shot of Jackson campaigning. Footage of Bolling saying that race will be a significant issue for the Jackson campaign; that some voters will not consider voting for a woman or a person of color to be president. Bolling says that the Jackson campaign needs to challenge the notion that a person of color cannot be president; that the media can help change those perceptions. Footage of Dukakis saying that he will not speculate on Jackson's chances of winning the nomination; that there is no frontrunner in the race; that polls are "absurd." George stands in front of the State House. George reports that the news media gave more attention last week to the Hart scandal than to the Iran-contra testimony. George notes that Dukakis probably hopes that this week's testimony will be given more attention than his standing in the polls.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/11/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt analyzes the results of the Wisconsin primary elections. She compares the election results for Democratic presidential candidates Michael Dukakis and Jesse Jackson. Vaillancourt reports that Wisconsin represents Dukakis' first victory in a mid-western state; she adds that Jackson is attracting more white voters than he did four years ago. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson is appealing to the hearts of voters while Dukakis appeals to their heads. Vaillancourt also analyzes the election results for Democratic candidates Al Gore and Paul Simon. Vaillancourt talks about the candidates chances in the upcoming New York primaries. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Jackson campaigning and marching with striking workers, Dukakis campaigning.
1:00:12: Visual: Footage of Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential candidate) at a campaign rally in Wisconsin. Dukakis says that it is time for some competence in the White House, after seven years of charisma. The crowd applauds for Dukakis. Shot of Dukakis speaking; of Dukakis talking to supporters seated at a table. Meg Vaillancourt reports that early returns show Dukakis leading in the Wisconsin primary; that the Wisconsin victory is the first for Dukakis in a mid-western state. V: Footage of Dukakis at a campaign rally. Dukakis says that he wants to be known as "the great builder," not as "the great communicator." Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis was the first choice of Catholic, Italian and Jewish voters in Wisconsin. Vaillancourt notes that the Dukakis campaign argues that Dukakis is the only Democratic candidate who is able to beat George Bush (Republican US Presidential candidate). V: Footage from a 1988 Dukakis campaign advertisement. Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) attracted huge crowds at campaign rallies in Wisconsin; that many of those voters ended up voting for Dukakis. V: Footage of Jackson at a campaign rally in Wisconsin. Jackson dons a blue T-shirt over his shirt and tie. Jackson shakes hands with audience members. Footage of Jackson talking about employment at a campaign rally. The audience applauds. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson walked with striking workers and talked with laid-off workers. V: Shots of Jackson marching with striking workers; of the marching workers. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson and Dukakis split the labor vote in Wisconsin; that labor leaders in Massachusetts campaigned for Dukakis in Wisconsin; that the Massachusetts labor leaders talked about the "Massachusetts Miracle." V: Footage of Dukakis speaking at a campaign rally; of Jackson talking about employment at a campaign rally. Vaillancourt reports that early returns show that Jackson will receive 90% of the African American vote and 25% of the white vote. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson is doing better with white voters than he did four years ago; that 15% of Jackson voters in Wisconsin are registered as Republicans. V: Shot of Jackson with supporters. Footage of Dukakis at a campaign rally. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson's campaign appeals to the hearts of voters; that Dukakis' campaign appeals to the heads of voters; that Dukakis's campaign strategy has been vindicated. Vaillancourt reports that Al Gore (Democratic US Presidential candidate) spent $300,000 on campaign ads in Wisconsin; that Gore pulled 15% of the vote. Vaillancourt notes that Gore has begun to place himself as the champion of Israel; that Gore is hoping that this position will play well with voters in the New York primary. Vaillancourt reports that Paul Simon (Democratic US Presidential candidate) did not do well in Wisconsin; that he is expected to put his campaign on hold tomorrow. V: Shots of Gore speaking; of Simon. Vaillancourt reports that the New York primaries are next; that Dukakis's win in Wisconsin will probably put a stop to efforts to draft Mario Cuomo (Governor of New York) as a potential Democratic candidate in the New York primary elections.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/05/1988
Description: State Senator Jack Backman opens a press conference in support of Mel King (Boston mayoral candidate) in front of the State House. Other participants include Byron Rushing (State Representative from the South End), Mary Jane Gibson (State Representative from Belmont), Susan Schur (State Representative from Newton), Mary Goode (former State Representative from Roxbury), and Barney Frank (US Congressman). Frank voices his support for King's candidacy and discusses the reasons for his endorsement, specifically, Frank talks about King's views on economic development and about his leadership abilities. Frank says that King is a creative leader who will bring "enlightened policy" to the city. Various reporters point out that Frank endorsed Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) in the primary elections. King arrives, shakes hands with Frank, thanks endorsers, and asserts that his administration will focus on employment, education, and the youth of the city.
1:00:10: Visual: Shot of a Mel King campaign sign. Jack Backman (State Senator) opens a press conference in front of the State House. He notes that Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) has not yet arrived. He voices his support for King. He introduces Byron Rushing (State Representative from the South End), Mary Jane Gibson (State Representative from Belmont), Susan Schur (State Representative from Newton), Mary Goode (former State Representative from Roxbury). Bachman lists off some state representatives who are due to arrive shortly at the press conference. Shots of Schur; of Rushing. Bachman introduces Barney Frank (US Congressman). 1:02:33: V: Frank says that he will support King for mayor of Boston; that he served with King for eight years in the legislature. Frank says that King is an advocate for enlightened policy for the city of Boston. Frank talks about King's ideas for economic development programs; about the Community Development Corporation. Frank says that King's ideas for development are in tune with the needs of city residents; that King is sensitive to the problems of displacement and the needs of area residents. Frank says that King can speak effectively on behalf of a diverse group of people; that King was an effective and respected legislator. Frank says that King will make an excellent mayor. A reporter asks Frank about his previous endorsements for mayor. Frank says that he is not always good at picking the winning candidate; that he speaks out on behalf of candidates who have good ideas and programs. A reporter notes that Frank endorsed Dennis Kearney (State Representative) in the primary election. He asks Frank how Kearney would have been a better mayor than King. Frank says that he endorsed Kearney in the primary because he thought Kearney was a good candidate with a good chance of winning. Frank says that Kearney and King take similar positions on the issues. Shot of King supporters standing behind Frank. Shot of Christy George (WGBH reporter). Audio is muffled. 1:07:45: V: Frank says that the many of the candidates in the race had similar positions on the issues; that King has helped shape the debate on the issues; that King was one of the first people to talk about the adverse effects of development on the elderly and the poor. Frank says that King is responsible for focusing the attention of the city on the management of economic development in a compassionate and effective manner. Frank says that he respects Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston); that King is more creative, thoughtful and consistent candidate; that King has proven himself to be an effective leader. Frank refuses to speculate on who he would have endorsed if King were not in the race. Frank says that he is endorsing a candidate because he is an elected official with an opinion; that he does not know what effect his endorsement has on a candidate's chances. A reporter asks Frank about the differences between King and Flynn. Frank says that the differences between the candidates stem from their past records; that King has proven himself to be a consistent and effective leader on economic issues for many years; that King has the capacity to stay with these issues. Frank notes that he does not agree with King on a mayor's role in foreign policy. A reporter asks Frank if King needs to highlight the issues on which he differs from Flynn. Frank says that King has stuck with the same issues for ten years; that his leadership has brought attention to these issues. Frank says that this has been a good mayoral campaign; that it has focused on issues. 1:13:15: V: Frank jokes with the reporters about his endorsement bringing in the voters from Brookline and Newton. A reporter asks Frank how King can get white liberal voters to support him instead of Flynn. Frank says that King can win voter support by focusing on the issues; that his positions on economic development may win over voters from traditionally "conservative" neighborhoods. A reporter asks Frank about his campaign advice for King. Frank says that King is doing the right thing by focusing on the issues; that King has proven his ability to be a leader on the issues. 1:16:32: V: King's supporters clap as he arrives at the State House. King and Frank shake hands. King thanks Frank and the assembled state representatives for their endorsements and support. King says that his administration will make the city open and accessible; that his administration will focus on employment, education, and the youth of the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/21/1983
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the tight race between candidates Michael Dukakis and Jesse Jackson for the Democratic nomination for the presidency. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson is still campaigning for the nomination; she adds that Dukakis needs to win 70% of the remaining delegates to win the nomination outright. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has done well in the primary elections and has registered voters to vote in the Democratic primaries. Vaillancourt reports that some Democrats would like to see Jackson as Dukakis's running mate. Vaillancourt's report includes footage from an interview with Dukakis. Dukakis says that he must win the nomination before deciding on a running mate. Vaillancourt interviews Jack Beatty (Atlantic Monthly), Paul Tsongas (former US Senator), Byron Rushing (State Representative) and Robert Kuttner (author, "The Life of the Party) about Jackson's role in the Democratic Party and his role in a Dukakis administration. They discuss Jackson as a potential running mate or cabinet member. Kuttner suggests that Jackson could recruit Mario Cuomo (Governor of New York) as a candidate by offering to be his running mate. Vaillancourt reports that both candidates are focused on campaigning. She notes that the Democratic convention is three months away. Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of Jackson campaigning and by footage of Dukakis campaigning.
1:00:16: Visual: Footage of Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential candidate) saying that the "whole situation is getting kind of serious." Shot of Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) at a campaign rally. Shot of Al Gore (Democratic US Presidential candidate). Meg Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis is ahead of Jackson by 50 delegates; that Gore might spoil Dukakis's chances of winning the New York primary. Vaillancourt notes that Gore will probably pull out of the race if Dukakis wins New York. V: Footage of Dukakis saying that his campaign will work hard to win like they did in Wisconsin. Footage of Jackson shaking hands with supporters. His supporters chant, "Win, Jesse, Win." Shot of Dukakis in a hard hat, shaking hands with workers. Shot of Jackson at a campaign rally. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has won almost as many raw votes as Dukakis. Vaillancourt speculates as to whether Dukakis should ask Jackson to be his running mate. V: Footage of Dukakis saying that he has to win the nomination before he can decide on a running mate. Shot of Dukakis shaking hands with a supporter seated at a table. Vaillancourt reports that one poll shows that a Dukakis/Jackson ticket could beat George Bush (Republican US Presidential candidate). V: Footage of Jack Beatty (The Atlantic Monthly) saying that some studies have shown that more than half of the electorate have a negative image of Jackson. Footage of Paul Tsongas (former US Senator) chuckling at the prospect of a Dukakis/Jackson ticket. Tsongas says that Dukakis and Jackson would enjoy "fascinating plane rides" as they campaigned together. Footage of Byron Rushing (State Representative) saying that Dukakis would probably treat a vice president in the same way he has treated lieutenant governors; that Jackson would not want to be in that position. Footage of Beatty saying that Jackson has a "peculiar burden." Beatty says that the Democratic Party needs to do well with white ethnic voters and white southern voters; that the Democratic Party already does well with African American voters. Footage of Jackson at a campaign rally. Jackson raises linked arms with supporters. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has done well in the primary elections; that Jackson has registered voters to vote; that Jackson has raised the profile of the race for the Democratic nomination. Vaillancourt says that the Democratic Party does not know what to do about Jackson. V: Footage of Rushing saying that Jackson should be able to suggest candidates for cabinet positions. Footage of Beatty being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Beatty says that Jackson would make an excellent cabinet member if appointed to the right position; that a good performance by Jackson in the cabinet would strengthen his next campaign for the presidency. Beatty says that it would not be condescending to appoint Jackson as the drug czar. Footage of Robert Kuttner (author of The Life of the Party) saying that the position of drug czar is the most difficult position in the cabinet; that the Democratic Party would be setting up Jackson for a defeat if he were appointed drug czar. Footage of Tsongas saying that Jackson needs to move to the center in order to attract voters and delegates. Shot of Jackson campaigning. Footage of Dukakis saying that the Democratic nominee needs to unite the party. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson is still campaigning for the nomination; that Dukakis needs to win 70% of the remaining delegates in order to win the nomination outright. V: Shot of Jackson giving a thumbs-up sign to the press. Footage of Kuttner saying that Dukakis must beat Jackson decisively in the remaining primary elections. Kuttner suggests that Jackson could try to recruit Mario Cuomo (Governor of New York) as a potential nominee by offering to be his running mate. Shot of Cuomo speaking. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis has not yet received Cuomo's endorsement. V: Footage of Dukakis telling a reporter that he spoke to Jackson on Wednesday morning. Vaillancourt reports that the Democratic convention is three months away; that neither Jackson or Dukakis will make any private deals yet. Vaillancourt reports that the Dukakis campaign is concentrating on winning the primary elections.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/07/1988
Description: Hope Kelly reports that Reverend Graylan Hagler of the Church of the United Community has announced his candidacy for mayor of Boston. He says that it is time for a change in the city of Boston. His supporters cheer. Kelly reviews Hagler's credentials and career. She notes that Hagler has a confrontational style and is experienced in the art of political theater. Kelly reviews Hagler's recent political activities. Kelly's report includes footage of Hagler addressing striking hotel and restaurant workers in November of 1988 and footage of Hagler with unemployed construction workers at a press conference at a Roxbury construction site in December of 1990. Kelly's report also includes footage of Hagler denouncing racism on the part of city officials at a press conference in the wake of the Carol Stuart murder case. Kelly's report includes footage from an interview with Hagler in March of 1991. He says that he is seeking justice and equity in the city.
1:00:11: Visual: Footage of the Reverend Graylan Ellis-Hagler (Church of the United Community) announcing his candidacy for mayor of Boston. Ellis-Hagler says that it is time for change. The audience applauds. Shots of Ellis-Hagler supporters cheering. Hope Kelly reports that Ellis-Hagler's announcement was a rousing reminder that many residents of the city are ready for a change. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler speaking to supporters. Ellis-Hagler says, "no more business as usual" and "no more disrespect." Kelly reports that Ellis-Hagler is a minister; that Ellis-Hagler was born in Baltimore and graduated from Oberlin College. Kelly reports that Ellis-Hagler listed many reasons why Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) should not be re-elected. V: Shots of Ellis-Hagler as he addresses the crowd. Shots of the audience. Footage of Ellis-Hagler addressing supporters. Ellis-Hagler says that streets in some neighborhoods have more trash-filled lots than houses. Ellis-Hagler says that the city is ready for a change. The audience applauds. Kelly reports that Ellis-Hagler says that his constituents are the ones who live on streets with vacant lots. Kelly reports that Ellis-Hagler believes that the city needs to hire more of its own residents instead of bringing in workers from outside. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler addressing supporters. Ellis-Hagler says that many workers in the city come from towns outside of the city. Ellis-Hagler says that the city is ready for change. The audience applauds. Shot of Chuck Turner (teacher) holding up Ellis-Hagler's arm as he sits down after his speech. Kelly reports that Ellis-Hagler is experienced in the art of political theater; that Ellis-Hagler does not give in or give up quickly. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler speaking to striking hotel and restaurant workers in November of 1988. Ellis-Hagler embraces Domenic Bozzotto (union leader). Footage of Ellis-Hagler at a press conference at a construction site in Dudley Square in December of 1990. Unemployed African-American construction workers stand behind him. Ellis-Hagler says that the workers will not "go away with crumbs." Shots of the construction site. Kelly reports that Ellis-Hagler was arrested twice last winter at the construction site of a new Post Office facility in Dudley Square. Kelly reports that Ellis-Hagler was supporting the cause of unemployed construction workers in his community. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler being interviewed on March 13, 1991. Ellis-Hagler says that people must buck the system in order to stand up for their dignity and rights. Footage of Ellis-Hagler at a press conference about the Carol Stuart murder case in January of 1990. Ellis-Hagler compares the actions of city officials and the media to the actions of the Ku Klux Klan. Ellis-Hagler says that the African American and Latino communities have been "raped" by the police and the media. Shot of an audience member at the press conference holding a sign reading, "What do Boston and South Africa have in common? Stopping and detaining men because of the color of their skin." Kelly reports that Ellis-Hagler excoriated the police, the media, and the mayor after the murder of Carol Stuart (Reading resident). Kelly notes that Ellis-Hagler's style is confrontational. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler being interviewed on March 13, 1991. Ellis-Hagler says that he has a desire to seek justice and equity in the city. Ellis-Hagler says that he wants the voices of all of the people to be heard. Kelly stands outside of a church. Kelly reports that Flynn' s campaign is following the actions of Ellis-Hagler; that Ellis-Hagler is short on money, but long on mission. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler addressing his supporters. Ellis-Hagler says that he and his supporters will win. The audience applauds. Ellis-Hagler steps back from the microphone and greets Elizabeth Ellis-Hagler (wife of Graylan Ellis-Hagler). Another man speaks into the microphone.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/01/1991
Description: Marcus Jones reports that voter support for Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) appears to be growing with each primary election, despite being labeled as "unelectable" by political analysts and the media. Jones notes that Jackson is gaining support from white voters and other voters outside of his political base. Jones suggests that critics are dismissive of Jackson because of his skin color. Jones' report includes footage from an interview with Bob Beckel (political analyst). Beckel says that Jackson will have to convince white voters and the media to see beyond his skin color. Jones' report features footage of Jackson campaigning, footage of Jackson at a candidates' forum and footage from a Jackson campaign advertisement. Jones' report also includes footage of Jackson saying that his race should not be an issue in the campaign.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (Democratic US presidential candidate) at a campaign rally in New Hampshire on February 16, 1988. Jackson say that his campaign has defied the odds; that his campaign has been winning "uphill battles." Shots of the crowd. Marcus Jones reports that political analysts and the media have called Jackson the "most unelectable candidate in the race for the White House." Jones notes that support for Jackson seems to be growing. V: Footage of Jackson announcing his candidacy in November of 1983. Footage from a 1988 political advertisement for Jackson. Jones notes that Jackson's candidacy in 1983 made history; that Jackson's victories in 1988 are exceptional. Jones adds that Jackson is gaining support from voters outside of his African American base. V: Footage of a white male saying that Jackson will win in the South; of another white male asking, "Why not?" Shot of Jackson at a campaign rally; of Jackson exiting an airplane. Jones notes that voters in Maine, Vermont, Minnesota, and other states are supporting Jackson. V: Footage of a white male in New Hampshire saying that critics are creating a negative image of Jackson. Footage of Jackson at a televised forum in Dallas. Jackson sits on stage with other Democratic candidates. Jackson says that the US should not be overly dependent on oil from the Persian Gulf; that every youth should have the opportunity to go to college. Jackson criticizes the defense policy of Ronald Reagan (US President). Jones suggests that critics are calling Jackson unelectable because of his skin color. V: Footage of Jackson in New Hampshire on October 12, 1987. Jackson says that the issue of his race should be left to "God"; that the issue of his credentials should be left up to the voters. Footage of Bob Beckel (political analyst) saying that Jackson addresses issues that other candidates are afraid to address. Beckel says that Jackson will have trouble convincing white voters and the media to see beyond his skin color. Beckel says that Jackson has "no shot" at winning. Beckel says that the situation is unfair to Jackson. Footage of Jackson at a campaign rally in New Hampshire. Supporters chant, "Win, Jesse, Win." Jones notes that Jackson's base of support continues to grow.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/04/1988
Description: Deborah Wang reports that Boston supporters of Jesse Jackson are undecided about whether to campaign for Michael Dukakis. The supporters recently met to discuss their role in the upcoming campaign. Jackson delegates Mel King, Saundra Graham, Juanita Wade, and Byron Rushing are among the leaders of the meeting. The leaders say that the Dukakis campaign should not take the votes of Jackson supporters for granted. There are some Jackson supporters who will not support Dukakis under any circumstances. Interview with Philip Stanley of the Dukakis campaign about the role of Jackson supporters in the Dukakis campaign. Stanley says that the Dukakis campaign has been meeting with Jackson supporters and that the campaign is taking no votes for granted. Interviews with Jackson supporters Darryl Heller, Trent Pettus and Myra McAdoo. All three supporters criticize the Dukakis campaign. Wang's report includes footage of Dukakis and Jackson at the 1988 Democratic National Convention and footage of Jackson embarking on a voter registration campaign. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Adult entertainment at the Highland Tap
1:00:02: Visual: Footage from July 21, 1988 of the Democratic National Convention. Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential nominee) and Kitty Dukakis (wife of Michael Dukakis) are congratulated by Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) and Jacqueline Jackson (wife of Jesse Jackson). They are surrounded by Democratic Party notables. Deborah Wang reports that Jackson ended his presidential campaign by endorsing the nomination of his rival Dukakis; that Jackson pledged to campaign for Dukakis in the fall. V: Footage of Jackson speaking at the Democratic Convention on July 18, 1988. Jackson is flanked by Dukakis and Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic US vice-presidential nominee). Jackson says that he is not seeking a job or a salary; that he wants to serve the nation. Shot of Jackson standing at the entrance to a campaign bus. Jackson waves to supporters. Supporters hang a sign on the side of the bus. The sign reads, "Rainbow voter registration campaign." Wang reports that Jackson supporters are undecided about whether to campaign for Dukakis; that Jackson supporters met last night in Roxbury about their role in the upcoming campaign. V: Shots of the audience at the meeting. Campaign leaders including Mel King (community activist and Jackson delegate), Saundra Graham (Jackson delegate), Byron Rushing (State Representative and Jackson delegate), and Juanita Wade (Jackson delegate) sit at a table at the front of the room. Footage of Wade saying that Jackson supporters will use the Republican threat to convince others to vote for Dukakis. Wang reports that Jackson supporters are unhappy with the Dukakis campaign. V: Footage of King saying that the Dukakis campaign has not been listening to Jackson supporters. King says that the Dukakis campaign should have addressed the role of Jackson supporters before now. Footage of Graham saying that Dukakis should be pursuing the 7 million votes represented by Jackson supporters. Shot of a life-size cut-out of Dukakis in the window of the Dukakis volunteer headquarters. Footage of Philip Stanley (State Director for the 1988 Dukakis campaign) being interviewed by Wang. Stanley says that he has met twice this week with the Jackson leadership; that the discussions are progressing. Stanley says that the Dukakis campaign is not taking anyone's vote for granted. Shots of volunteers working at the Dukakis volunteer headquarters. Wang reports that some Jackson supporters says that they will not work for Dukakis under any circumstances. V: Shot of Rushing addressing the audience at the meeting of Jackson supporters. Footage of Darryl Heller (Jackson supporter) saying that Dukakis made a mistake by choosing Bentsen as his running mate. Heller says that Bentsen does not believe in any of the same things as Jackson; that Bentsen is closer to Ronald Reagan (US President) than he is to Jackson. Heller says that it would be a violation of his conscience to vote for the Dukakis ticket. Footage of Trent Pettus (Jackson supporter) saying that he will not vote for Dukakis. Pettus says that Dukakis does not believe that gays and lesbians are fit to be foster parents. Pettus says that Dukakis advocates a discriminatory policy against gays and lesbians. Pettus adds that he will not vote for Dukakis. Footage of Myra McAdoo (Jackson supporter) saying that Dukakis needs to be ready to deal realistically with minority groups; that Jackson needs to receive a message from minority groups. Wang reports that some Jackson supporters will work to revive the Rainbow Coalition; that the supporters will work to get Rainbow candidates elected to state and local offices. V: Shots of Jackson supporters at the meeting in Roxbury. Footage of Jackson at the Democratic National Convention. Shots of delegates on the floor waving signs reading, "Jesse!" Wang notes that Jackson supporters will try to gain concessions from the Democratic Party. V: Footage of Rushing saying that he wants his constituents to be represented fairly by the chosen leader of the Democratic Party. Rushing says that Jackson supporters must barter their votes for fair representation. Rushing says that Jackson supporters must not be taken for granted by Dukakis. Wang stands in front of the Dukakis volunteer headquarters. Wang reports that Dukakis may not need to make peace with local Jackson supporters; that Dukakis is expected to win Massachusetts easily. Wang reports that Jackson supporters hope that Dukakis includes them in his campaign. Wang adds that Jackson supporters want Dukakis to make it clear that he does not take Jackson voters for granted.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/25/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Jesse Jackson beat George Bush in a phone poll conducted by a local radio station. Interviews with City Councilor Bruce Bolling and State Rep. Gloria Fox about their support for Jesse Jackson's presidential campaign. Fox says that Jackson's campaign staff is working hard for a Jackson victory. Bolling says that diverse constituencies can find common ground in Jackson's candidacy. Jackson at a campaign rally.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) entering a campaign rally. Marcus Jones reports that Jackson beat George Bush (Republican US Presidential candidate) in a phone poll conducted of callers to WEEI (Boston AM radio station). V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) saying that Jackson will be the next president of the US. Jones reports that Bolling is the chairman of Jackson's Massachusetts' campaign. V: Shot of Bolling with Jackson at a campaign rally. Footage of Bolling saying that voters see Jackson as a man of conviction, compassion and vision. Footage of Gloria Fox (State Representative) being interviewed by Jones. Fox says that Jackson's campaign workers are serious about the campaign; that they are working hard for a Jackson victory. Fox says that Jackson has a good campaign organization; that voters are tired of politicians who do not address their needs. Footage of Bolling saying that diverse constituencies can find a common ground in Jackson's message. Bolling adds that voters are not listening to political pundits who say that Jackson is unelectable. Footage of Fox saying that Jackson's campaign is on a roll.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/29/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson has released position papers detailing his stance on domestic issues. Vaillancourt reviews Jackson's positions on the economy, trade, employment, social programs, defense spending, and taxes. Interview with labor union leader Domenic Bozzotto and Harvard professor Roger Porter about Jackson's positions on the issues. Bozzotto defends Jackson's platform while Porter criticizes it. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson would support his social programs through cuts in defense spending and increased taxes on wealthy Americans. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson's position as the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination challenges other candidates to defend their positions on the issues. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: James Farmer speaks at a ceremony in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr.
1:00:07: Visual: C-Span footage of Jesse Jackson (US Democratic Presidential Candidate) addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. The audience cheers for Jackson. Footage of Jackson quoting poetry to a reporter. On-screen visuals list details about Jackson's position on the economy. On-screen text reads, "Invest pensions in America." Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has a stack of position papers on economic issues. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson advocates the investment of pension funds in federally-guaranteed securities; that Jackson would use the capital to fund public housing, roads, and other public works projects; that the investment of 10% of US pensions would yield $60 billion for projects. V: Shot of Jackson talking about his positions at a forum; of Jackson addressing supporters at a campaign rally. Footage of Domenic Bozzotto (President, Hotel Workers Union) that he likes Jackson' s idea of putting pension money to work for social good; that Jackson's plan also gives a fair return on the investment. Footage of Roger Porter (Harvard University) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Porter says that Jackson's plan calls for government guarantees on pension investments; that the government could end up paying the difference on a poor investment. Vaillancourt says that trade issues are another important issue in the election. V: On-screen visuals list details about Jackson's position on trade issues. On-screen text reads, "Adopt 'corporate code of conduct'." Footage of Jackson saying that General Electric is the number one exporter from Taiwan. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson believes that cheap overseas labor is the main cause of the US trade deficit. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson would abolish tax incentives for US companies abroad; that Jackson would insist that America's trading partners pay the same wages as those earned by US workers. V: Shots of Jackson marching with union workers. Footage of Bozzotto saying that "slave wages" paid to workers abroad will undercut organized labor in the US. Footage of Porter saying that the US cannot impose these policies on its trading partners. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson is a populist on employment issues. V: On-screen visuals and text detail Jackson's position on employment. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson supports an increase in the minimum wage; that Jackson supports the passage of a worker bill of rights; that Jackson supports the plant closing law; that Jackson supports comparable pay for jobs of comparable worth. V: Footage of Jackson addressing supporters. On-screen visuals detail Jackson's positions on social programs. Vaillancourt talks about Jackson's position on social programs. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson supports universal day care and national health care; that Jackson would double spending on education; that Jackson would focus on combatting drugs. V: Footage of Porter saying that the government cannot support the increase in spending required by Jackson's social programs. Footage of Bozzotto saying that Jackson's programs would get the average person involved in the economy. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson believes that social programs can be paid for through cuts in the defense budget. V: On-screen visuals and text detail Jackson's position on defense issues. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson would eliminate the MX, the Midgetman and the Trident missiles; that Jackson would eliminate the F-15 fighter plane, the stealth bomber, and the Strategic Defense Initiative. V: Footage of Bozzotto saying that there is "fat" to be cut out of the defense budget. Footage of Porter saying that Jackson is misguided in thinking that cuts in the defense budget will yield great savings. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson is the only current Democratic candidate who has talked about taxes. V: Footage of Jackson saying that "Reaganomics" exempted some people from paying taxes. On-screen visuals and text detail Jackson's position on taxes. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson would increase the corporate tax rate to 46%; that Jackson would raise the tax rate to 38.5% for residents with incomes above $100,000; that Jackson would impose an oil import fee. V: Footage of Porter saying that Jackson's tax policy would rob the private sector of money for productive investment. Footage of Bozzotto saying that Jackson is not afraid of the American people; that Jackson is not afraid to advocate change. Vaillancourt reports that the media and the public are now paying attention to Jackson's positions on the issues; that Jackson's position as a frontrunner challenges other candidates to defend their own positions.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/04/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that James Farmer (civil rights leader) spoke at Faneuil Hall during a ceremony to commemorate the death of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Jones notes that Farmer was the head of the Congress for Racial Equality in the 1950s. Jones' report includes footage of Farmer addressing the audience at Faneuil Hall. Jones interviews Farmer about progress on civil rights issues in the US. Jones reports that Charles Yancey read a proclamation honoring King during the ceremony at Faneuil Hall. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of Yancey reading a proclamation at the ceremony and by footage of schoolchildren performing at the ceremony. Jones' report also includes footage of King during the civil rights movement. This tape includes additional footage from the ceremony at Faneuil Hall. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Jesse Jackson (Democratic candidate for US President) has released position papers, detailing his stance on domestic issues
1:00:04: Visual: Black and white footage of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader) delivering a speech. Black and white footage of a white man announcing the death of King to a group of students. Marcus Jones reports that today is the twentieth anniversary of King's death. Jones reports that James Farmer (civil rights leader) talked to an audience at a ceremony commemorating King's death at Faneuil Hall. V: Footage of Farmer addressing an audience at Fanueil Hall. Farmer talks about King's vision for the nation. Shots of the audience. Jones reports that Farmer was the head of the Congress for Racial Equality in the 1950s; that Farmer is now a visiting professor at Mary Washington College in Virginia. Jones says that Farmer believes that minorities have made great strides in the past twenty years. V: Footage of Farmer being interviewed by Jones at Faneuil Hall. Farmer says that there are plenty of things that need to change in the US; that some progress has been made by minorities. Jones reports that Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) read a city proclamation honoring King at the ceremony at Faneuil Hall. V: Footage of Yancey addressing the audience. Yancey says that King was once refused admittance to the Patrick T. Campbell Junior High School in Boston; that the school is now named for King. Jones reports that students from the Martin Luther King Middle School performed a song in honor of King. V: Footage of students from the King Middle School performing at Faneuil Hall. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/04/1988
Description: Christy George reports that Jesse Jackson came to Boston to support the strike by employees of New England Telephone. Jackson addresses the strikers at City Hall Plaza. Management and employees cannot agree on who should pay for workers' health benefits. Interview with New England Telephone spokesman Peter Cronin, who says that the union agreed to share health care costs in 1986. George reports that employees accuse management of staging a "take-back." Jan Pierce of Communication Workers of America attends the rally on City Hall Plaza. Pierce rips up a phone bill and urges the workers not to pay their bills until the strike is over. The union is asking customers to stall payment on their phone bills until the strike is over. National unions are backing the Nynex strikers. Striking workers demonstrate outside of the New England Telephone building. The strikers urge a woman not to pay her phone bill.
1:00:14: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (leader, Rainbow Coalition) addressing the striking employees of Nynex at City Hall Plaza. Jackson wears a baseball cap and a denim jacket. Jackson says that working people must take back America. Shots of striking workers waving signs and applauding for Jackson. Christy George reports that Jackson came to Boston to support the strike by employees of New England Telephone. V: Footage of Jackson saying that the workers need a health plan, not a "stale plan." The crowd applauds for Jackson and repeats his chants. Shots of the striking workers. Shots of hundreds of people assembled on City Hall Plaza. George reports that the telephone company and the workers do not agree on who should pay for the workers' health benefits. George reports that Nynex maintains that the union agreed to share the rising cost of health benefits. V: Footage of Peter Cronin (Spokesman, New England Telephone) saying that the union agreed in 1986 to share costs if the price of health benefits reached a certain level in 1988. Cronin says that the cost of health benefits has reached the level at which employees are expected to share costs or to take a deductible. George reports that employees say that Nynex is involved in a "take-back." George notes that the union says that it is fighting for all unions. George adds that today's rally included striking employees from Eastern Airlines and the United Mine Workers. V: Shots of striking workers at City Hall Plaza. Shots of uniformed pilots standing at the front of the rally. George reports that Jackson preached solidarity; that Jackson called on the workers to fight against the anti-labor policies of Ronald Reagan (former US president) and George Bush (US President). V: Footage of Jackson addressing the striking workers. Jackson encourages the workers to vote. He urges them to vote for important issues like wages, health care, education, and justice. Shot of a sign reading, "I won't pay my phone bill until the Nynex strike is over." George reports that the rally kicked off a new strategy by the union. V: Footage of Jan Pierce (Vice-President, Communication Workers of America) addressing the rally. Pierce rips up a phone bill and tosses the pieces into the air. Pierce urges the workers not to pay their phone bills until the strike is over. The workers cheer. Footage of Cronin saying that a customer should pay his or her bill if a service is provided. Cronin says that Nynex customers are reasonable; that Nynex customers will pay their bills. George reports that the union is actually asking customers to stall payments or to pay the minimum amount to keep their phone connected. V: Shot of a Boston Police cruiser. The cruiser has a sign supporting the strike on its window. Footage of strikers outside of the New England Telephone building on Franklin Street. Police officers are posted at the entrance to the building. Striking workers tell a female customer not to pay her phone bill. The workers tell the woman that her phone will not be disconnected because there are no workers to disconnect the phones. The woman walks away without paying her bill. The workers applaud. George stands in front of the New England Telephone building. George reports that labor unions have been losing ground in the US; that national unions are putting a lot of effort into the Nynex strike. George notes that the AFL-CIO is behind the strategy of asking customers to delay payment of their phone bills. George adds that the AFL-CIO represents a lot of people. V: Shots of the striking workers in front of the Nynex building. The workers chant, "Don't pay your bills." Shots of individual workers; of the exterior of the New England Telephone building. George reports that the AFL-CIO is throwing its weight behind this strike; that a win for labor would reverse a series of defeats. George notes that all unions will lose ground if the telephone company wins this strike. V: Shots of the striking workers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/15/1989
Description: David Boeri reports that Jesse Jackson will travel to Iraq to interview Saddam Hussein for the Jesse Jackson Show. Previously, Jackson has met with both the Iraqi ambassador and Prince Turki bin Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia, the brother of King Faad. Prince Aziz considers Jackson's trip to be a diplomatic mission to cool hostilities between Iraq and the United States. Boeri's report includes footage of Prince Aziz and his entourage. Interview with Mustafa Aziz, an advisor to Prince Aziz, who says that Jackson is well regarded in the Middle East. Boeri notes that George Bush does not support Jackson's trip. Jackson traveled to Syria in 1984 to secure the release of US Navy pilot Robert Goodman, Jr.. Footage from a press conference with Goodman and Jackson and footage of Ronald Reagan, who didn't like Jackson's 1984 trip. Many suspect Jackson of using guise of a journalist carry out a diplomatic mission to Iraq. Boeri's report features footage from the Jesse Jackson Show.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) from the Jesse Jackson Show on October 5, 1989. Jackson talks about his goal of discussing a broad range of ideas and viewpoints on his show. David Boeri reports that Jackson has found controversial ideas to discuss on his show. Boeri reports that Saddam Hussein (leader of Iraq) will be a guest star on Jackson's show; that Jackson's producers hope to be in Baghdad by the weekend. Boeri notes that Jackson's show will be syndicated. V: Shot of Hussein speaking on a telephone; of Hussein exiting a vehicle and being greeted by a few soldiers. Shot of an Iraqi military soldier in a bunker; of Iraqi military soldiers standing at attention. Footage of Jackson in Syria in January of 1984. Jackson sits beside Lieutenant Robert Goodman, Jr. (US Navy pilot) at a press conference. Jackson expresses gratitude for religious leaders and people who prayed and fasted for Goodman's release. Boeri reports that Jackson visited Syria in 1984; that Jackson went on a mission to free a US Navy pilot shot down by the Syrians. V: Footage of Jackson greeting an official in January of 1984. Footage of Goodman at the press conference with Jackson. Goodman says that he is happy to be going home; that Jackson is respected in the Middle East. Boeri reports that George Bush (US President) has not commented publicly on Jackson's trip to Iraq. Boeri reports that Ronald Reagan (former US President) did not appreciate Jackson's efforts in Syria in 1984; that Reagan did not return Jackson's pre-trip phone calls. V: Shot of Reagan speaking at a press conference during his presidency. Boeri reports that permission for Jackson's upcoming trip to Iraq was granted after a meeting with the Iraqi ambassador. Boeri reports that Jackson has been involved in a round of meetings; that Jackson recently traveled to Boston to meet Prince Turki bin Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia (brother of King Faad of Saudi Arabia). V: Shot of Jackson speaking. Footage of Prince Aziz and his entourage entering a luncheon room. Aziz greets US officials and members of the press, including Boeri. Boeri reports that Prince Aziz is fifth in the line of succession to the Saudi throne; that Aziz is a former deputy defense minister; that Aziz has been staying at the Charles Hotel in Cambridge. Boeri notes that Dr. Mustafa Aziz (advisor to Prince Aziz) believes that Jackson's upcoming trip to Iraq may be the last chance for a peaceful solution. V: Footage of Dr. Mustafa Aziz being interviewed by Boeri. Mustafa Aziz says that Jackson is seen in the Middle East as an honest politician and a civil rights champion. Boeri reports that Prince Aziz considers Jackson's trip to be a diplomatic mission instead of a journalistic mission. Boeri notes that Prince Aziz considers violent hostilities to be imminent. V: Footage of Mustafa Aziz being interviewed by Boeri. Mustafa Aziz says that the situation is tense and explosive. Boeri stands in front of the Charles Street Hotel. Boeri reports that the Bush administration told Jackson that they do not want him to go to Iraq; that the Bush administration said that they would not stop Jackson; that the Bush administration wished Jackson good luck. Boeri reports that Jackson's producers see the trip as an opportunity for Jackson to prove himself as a world-class journalist with international connections. Boeri notes that many suspect Jackson of taking cover as a journalist while on diplomatic mission to Baghdad. Boeri reports that Prince Aziz has installed a satellite on the roof of the Charles Hotel; that Prince Aziz will be watching Jackson's broadcast from Baghdad.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/23/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson visited Harvard Law School to join student protests over the school's minority hiring practices. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson supports Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School), who has announced that he will leave his post to protest the school's poor affirmative action record. Derrick Bell is Harvard's first African-American tenured professor. Vaillancourt reports that there are only five tenured female professors and three tenured African American male professors out of sixty-one tenured professors at the school. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Jackson addressing students at the school. Barack Obama is seen among students in the background. Jackson shakes hands with Bell and condemns the school's affirmative action record. Vaillancourt notes that the school administration has refused Jackson's offer to act as a mediator on the issue. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson accused Harvard Law School of institutional racism and sexism. She adds that Robert Clark (Dean, Harvard Law School) issued a statement defending the school's hiring practices. Vaillancourt's report features footage of Bell at a student demonstration at Harvard Law School in April 1990 and footage of Jackson at a student demonstration. This tape includes additional footage of Jackson addressing demonstrators at Harvard Law School.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) speaking at Harvard Law School. Jackson says that affirmative action is a response to years of denial by law. Shots of the audience listening to Jackson in a lecture hall at the school. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson's visit to Harvard Law School attracted national attention to the controversy over the school's minority hiring practices. V: Footage of Jackson addressing the audience. Jackson says that it is an error and an insult to say that there is no African American woman qualified to be a tenured professor at Harvard Law School. Shots of the audience. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson visited the school to support Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School). Vaillancourt notes that Bell was the first African American to be granted tenure at Harvard Law School. Vaillancourt reports that Bell has announced that he will leave his post to protest the school's poor affirmative action record. V: Shot of Jackson and Bell shaking hands in the conference hall. Footage from April 24, 1990 of Bell at a demonstration on the campus of Harvard Law School. Bell addresses student demonstrators. Bell says that he he has urged students to take risks to further their beliefs; that he must now do the same. Shot of demonstrators holding a sign reading, "Where are our tenured black women professors?" Vaillancourt reports that Bell will take a leave of absence until the school adds a woman of color to the faculty. Vaillancourt notes that there are 61 tenured professors at the school; that three of those professors are African American; that the African American professors are all male. Vaillancourt reports that half of the students at Harvard Law School are women; that there are only five tenured female professors; that there are no Latino or Asian law professors at the school. V: Shots of Bell and Jackson entering the lecture hall; of students standing and applauding for Bell and Jackson. Shots of white and African American female students in the audience. Shot of Jackson, Bell and a white woman raising linked arms at the front of the lecture hall. The students applaud. Vaillancourt reports that the school seems ready to accept Bell's departure; that Robert Clark (Dean of Harvard Law School) declined to speak on camera about the school's hiring practices. Vaillancourt reports that Clark issued a statement in which he defended the slow pace of change at Harvard Law School. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has accused Harvard of institutional racism and sexism. V: Shot of students demonstrators on the Harvard Law School campus on April 24, 1990. Footage of Jackson addressing student demonstrators outside on the campus of Harvard Law School. Student supporters stand behind him. Jackson says that Harvard should negotiate with Bell and the student demonstrators. The demonstrators applaud Jackson. Vaillancourt stands outside of a building on the Harvard Law School campus. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson met briefly with Clark today; that the school has refused Jackson's offer to act as a mediator on the issue of faculty diversity. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson called for a reexamination of race relations in the US during his speech at Harvard Law School. V: Footage of Jackson addressing an audience in a lecture hall at Harvard Law School. Jackson says that most people in the world are not white nor are they males. Jackson says that these people cannot wait for some archaic standard to allow them to be appraised as worthy by white males. Shots of students in the audience. Shot of Jackson entering a room. Jackson shakes hands and embraces Bell. Jackson shakes hands with other Harvard Law School professors and officials. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has called for a new Kerner Commission; that the Kerner Commission issued a study twenty years ago which concluded that white America and black America were separate and unequal. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson praised Bell for his courage; that Jackson called on Harvard Law School faculty to support Bell. V: Footage of Jackson addressing an audience in the lecture hall. Jackson talks about the sacrifices made by Rosa Parks (civil rights activist) and Martin Luther King (civil rights leader). Jackson says that Bell is taking a principled stand; that Bell is drawing attention to the problem of racism and sexism at Harvard. Shots of Bell at a demonstration on the Harvard Law School campus on April 24, 1990. Shots of Bell addressing a demonstration outside of a building on the Harvard Law School campus today. Jackson stands beside Bell. Student demonstrators stand behind them. The demonstrators raise their linked arms. A demonstrator holds a sign reading, "diversity now." Vaillancourt reports that faculty were scheduled to vote today on a resolution encouraging diversity. Vaillancourt notes that Harvard officials say that a personal matter forced the dean to end the meeting before the resolution came to a vote. Vaillancourt notes that the vote was not rescheduled.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/09/1990
Description: Christy George reports that Jesse Jackson spoke about leadership in a speech at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. George reports that Jackson is very active in this non-election year. George's report includes footage of Jackson walking a picket line with striking Eastern Airline employees and footage of Jackson visiting an Armenian earthquake zone. George talks about Jackson's activities since the 1988 election. George's report also features footage from Jackson's speech at Harvard. Jackson talks about voter cynicism in the 1988 election and the qualities of a good leader. Jackson says that the US must invest in itself in order to flourish. He explains a metaphorical term: "honeybee sense." George's report also includes footage from Jackson's 1988 presidential campaign. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Lee Atwater visits Massachusetts for a Republican Party fundraiser
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) as he enters an auditorium at the John F. Kennedy School of Goverment at Harvard University. The audience applauds for Jackson. Shot of a man in the crowd. Footage of Jackson addressing the audience. Jackson jokes about his speech being televised on C-Span. Jackson waves to his mother. Christy George reports that Jackson talked about the scarcity of good leaders in American politics during his speech at the Kennedy School of Government. V: Footage of Jackson delivering his speech. Jackson says that public cynicism won more voters than Bush did in the 1988 campaign. Jackson notes that 50% of the eligible voters did not vote; that 70% of voters expressed a desire for a different choice. Jackson says that Bush's campaign won while the country lost. Footage of Jackson at a campaign rally in New Hampshire on February 16, 1988. The crowd chants, "Win, Jesse, Win." George notes that Jackson travels the country regularly in non-election years. V: Shots of Jackson doing a television interview; of Jackson picketing with striking Eastern Airline employees. George reports that Jackson has walked with striking Eastern Airline employees across the nation; that Jackson turned a tour of an Armenian earthquake zone into a Soviet-American people's summit. V: Shot of a Soviet news anchor reading the news; of Jackson kissing a baby in Armenia. Footage of Jackson looking out of a window while riding on a bus in Armenia. Jackson speaks to the media, saying that human beings must care for one another. Footage of Jackson at a 1988 campaign rally. George calls Jackson a "perpetual candidate" and a "peripatetic preacher." V: Footage of Jackson speaking at the Kennedy School. Jackson says that he is a "liberal" who fights for change. Jackson says that pollsters and pundits are looking for a manufactured candidate. Jackson says that great leaders do not follow opinion polls; that great leaders mold public opinion. Jackson says that John F. Kennedy (former US President) was not following opinion polls when he reached out to Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Jackson says that Kennedy's actions were based on courage and principles. Jackson says that the US needs bold leadership to deal with the nation's "structural crisis." Jackson talks about "honeybee sense." Jackson says that honeybees know to drop pollen when they pick up nectar; that honeybees know the importance of keeping the flowers alive. Jackson says that the US needs to invest in itself in order to stay alive and flourish. The crowd rises to its feet and applauds for Jackson.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1989
Description: John Hashimoto reports that Jesse Jackson visited Madison Park High School to talk to students. Hashimoto's report includes footage of Jackson's address to students in the school gymnasium. The students cheer enthusiastically as he approaches the podium. Jackson tells students that they must live with the consequences of their actions. He tells them that they can become whatever they want to be. He reprimands one student for talking during his speech. Jackson urges students to register to vote. He directs those who are not registered to a voter registration table in the gymnasium. Hashimoto reports on speculation that Jackson will run for the presidency in 1992. Hashimoto notes that Jackson could be elected senator if Washington DC becomes a state. Hashimoto reports that Jackson also spoke at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Hashimoto notes that Jackson addressed national and political issues in his address at UMass. Hashimoto's report features footage of Jackson's address at UMass. Hashimoto reports that Jackson is working to keep himself visible. Hashimoto calls Jackson a "perennial candidate" for elected office. The edited news story is followed by b-roll footage of Jackson and his entourage arriving at the high school, and the opening of the assembly including color guard and the end of the national anthem. Additional footage of Jackson's address. Byron Rishing, Bruce Bolling, and Charles Yancey sit behind Jackson during assembly. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Francis "Mickey" Roache speaks to high school students on police stop-and-search policy
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) holding up a child as the media photographs him. Jackson greets supporters and students at Madison Park High School in Roxbury. Shots of students in the audience. John Hashimoto reports that Jackson visited Madison Park High School to talk to students about reality, hope, and self-determination. V: Footage of Jackson addressing the students. Jackson asks students to stand if they know someone their age who is in jail because of drugs. Shots of students standing up in the audience. Footage of Jackson pointing to a student in the audience. Jackson tells the student that he will escort the student out of the auditorium if the student does not stop talking. Jackson tells the student to respect the student assembly. Footage of Jackson telling the students that they can be whatever they want to be. Jackson says that if Dan Quayle (US Vice-President) can be vice president, then the students can be whatever they want to be. The students applaud. Shots of students in the audience. Footage of Jackson telling the students that they must live with the consequences of their actions. Shots of the students rising to their feet to applaud for Jackson. Hashimoto reports that Jackson ended his talk by urging the students to vote. V: Footage of Jackson addressing the students. Jackson asks the students who are eligible to vote but who are not registered to come down to the voter registration table. Shots of students walking toward the table; of students registering to vote at the table. Hashimoto reports that many are wondering if Jackson will run for president in 1992. V: Footage of Jackson addressing the students. Jackson says that he will not talk about 1992. Jackson says that his priorities are to organize workers and to register voters. Shots of students lined up to register to vote. Hashimoto reports that Jackson sounds like a candidate; that Jackson is one of the backers of a bill to make Washington DC a state unto itself. Hashimoto notes that Washington DC would need 2 senators if it became a state; that Jackson could be a candidate for one of those two positions. V: Footage of Jackson, his entourage, and his supporters walking outside of a school building. Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) walks with Jackson. Shot of Jackson entering a gymnasium at University of Massachusetts in Boston to the roaring applause of students. Jackson shakes hands with students near the podium. Shots of the audience as they applaud. Hashimoto reports that Jackson spoke at UMass Boston today; that he addressed national and political issues. V: Footage of Jackson speaking at UMass Boston. Jackson talks about the need to rebuild small towns in the US. Shots of Jackson addressing the audience at UMass Boston. Hashimoto reports that Jackson is working to keep himself visible. Hashimoto notes that Jackson's dominance as the nation's most visible African American leader is threatened by moderate politicians like Douglas Wilder (Governor of Virginia). V: Shot of Wilder exiting a voting booth. Hashimoto reports that Jackson will host his own television talk show in the fall. V: Shots of Jackson addressing the audience at UMass Boston. Footage of Jackson saying that it is time for mass action, mass education, mass demonstration; that it is time for the US to do the right thing. Hashimoto stands in the gymnasium at UMass Boston. Hashimoto reports that Jackson acts like a winner despite losing the Democratic nomination in 1988. Hashimoto says that many wonder if Jackson will ever become an elected official instead of a "galvanizing symbol." Hashimoto notes that Jackson is a perennial candidate for office, but has never won.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/08/1990
Description: Sam Fleming reports that Jesse Jackson is campaigning in New Hampshire. Some consider Jackson to be the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination, but many political observers doubt Jackson's chances of winning the nomination. Jackson addresses supporters at a campaign rally, including about his support for the gay and lesbian community. Interviews with enthusiastic Jackson supporters in New Hampshire. Jackson tells reporters that his race is not as important as his credentials. He addresses another rally on the need for national affordable health care. Interview with Joe Grandmaison the Chairman of the New Hampshire Democratic Party, who says that it would not be wise to underestimate Jackson and his campaign. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Ray Flynn, Michael Dukakis, and Bruce Bolling discuss linkage between Chinatown development and Parcel 18 in Roxbury
1:00:54: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (Democratic candidate for US President) getting his picture taken in front of the fall foliage in New Hampshire. Jackson walks into a rustic building. Sam Fleming reports that Jackson is trying to secure voter support in New Hampshire; that Jackson is considered to be the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination. V: Shots of Jackson shaking hands with New Hampshire voters. Shot of Jackson addressing the crowd. The crowd applauds. Fleming reports that many political observers doubt Jackson's chances of winning the nomination; that Jackson is not paying attention to the "conventional wisdom" of the political observers. V: Footage of Jackson addressing the crowd. Shots of members of the crowd. Jackson talks about speaking at last weekend's rally for gays and lesbians in Washingon D.C. Jackson says that the voices of gays and lesbians deserve to be heard. Fleming notes that Jackson is reaching out to the dispossesed. V: Footage of Jackson talking about his efforts to build a diverse coalition of supporters. Jackson says that his leadership will put the nation on a course for jobs, peace, and justice. The crowd applauds. Shots of individual audience members. Footage of an older white female voter saying that Jackson is "energizing"; of a white female voter saying that she hopes that Jackson has a chance at the nomination. Footage of an older white male voter saying that some critics are trying to create a negative image of Jackson; that Jackson is "electable." Footage of Jackson speaking to reporters. A reporter asks Jackson if an African American can win the Democratic nomination. Jackson says that the issue of his race should be left to "God"; that the issue of his credentials should be left up to the voters. Fleming notes that Jackson has been questioned about the state of his marriage. V: Footage of Jackson telling reporters that he will not speculate about rumors; that he is fighting to win the nomination. Fleming reports that Jackson opened his campaign office in Manchester, N.H. V: Footage of a crowd gathered in front of Jackson's campaign office. Shot of a white female voter holding a hand-made Jackson campaign sign. The crowd begins to chant, "We want Jesse." Jackson shakes hands with voters outside of the office. Shots of an older white man; of a young African American boy in the crowd. Jackson addresses the crowd. Jackson talks about the need for a national health care system. Jackson says that he will provide "bold leadership." Fleming notes that Jackson did well with white Democratic voters in New Hampshire in 1984. Fleming reports that one Jackson campaign supporter said that the Jackson campaign lacked an organized structure; that fundraising so far has been minimal. Fleming adds that some voters see Jackson as a candidate supported mainly by African Americans. V: Shots of Jackson addressing a crowd; of individual members of the crowd. Footage of Joe Grandmaison (Chairman, New Hampshire Democratic Party) saying that no one underestimates the strength of Jackson and his message. Footage of Jackson addressing the crowd about the need to save jobs, schools, farms, and the environment, and to "give peace a chance." The crowd chants along with Jackson and applauds for him. Shot of an elderly woman at the Jackson campaign rally.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/12/1987
Description: A Ten O'Clock News special features an interview with Jesse Jackson (Democratic candidate for US President). Christopher Lydon (WGBH), Dennis Farney (Wall Street Journal), and Ken Bode (NBC News) interview Jackson. Lydon notes that the goal of the interview is to discover how Jackson's character would shape his presidency. Jackson jokes about the psychoanalytic nature of the interview. Jackson talks about growing up in a segregated society and participating in the civil rights movement. He answers questions about his childhood. He talks about his campaign and the support he has received so far. Jackson talks about the challenges faced by young African Americans, and says that young African Americans must work twice as hard as whites in order to succeed. Jackson says that some conservative African Americans may not support his candidacy; he adds that people of all races are finding common ground in his candidacy. Jackson reviews the accomplishments of his political organization and talks about his experiences in shaping political policy during the 1960s and the 1970s. He names the politicians whom he admires. He talks about his relationship to the Democratic Party leadership and about his efforts to open up the Democratic Party to minority voters. Jackson says that he would like to establish better relations between the African American community and the Jewish community. He names the people to whom he turns for advice. Jackson says that he regrets the splintering of the civil rights movement in the 1970s. He talks about the Rainbow Coalition as a means to reunite those groups. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:37: Visual: WGBH logo. Christopher Lydon introduces an "extended conversation" with Jesse Jackson (candidate for US President). Lydon notes that the half hour show was planned in cooperation with the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Lydon adds that the goal of the interview is to discover how Jackson's character would shape his presidency. Lydon introduces in-studio guests Dennis Farney (Wall Street Journal) and Ken Bode (NBC News). Lydon reviews biographical facts about Jackson including date of birth, education, and his career in the civil rights movement. Lydon asks Jackson which actor he would choose to portray Jesse Jackson in a movie about his life, and what Jackson would tell the actor about his character. Jackson jokes about the psychoanalytic nature of this interview. Jackson talks about growing up in a segregated society. Jackson says that he is sensitive to the needs of the poor and the disenfranchised; that he participated in the civil rights movement and has seen great changes. Jackson says that he has not grown bitter about US society because he has seen such great changes. 1:04:28: V: Farney asks Jackson about his childhood and whether he felt rejected by his father. Jackson talks about feeling a sense of rejection as a child; that he was called a "bastard." Jackson says that his athletic and academic success were his way of fighting back against those who rejected him or laughed at him. Jackson says that he has grown accustomed to adversity and to the "double standard" which exists in society. Bode asks Jackson if the US is ready for an African American president. Bode mentions that Bill Lucy (African American union leader) has said that the US is not ready. Jackson notes that he has been received warmly in New Hampshire. Jackson says that no one will know if the US is ready for an African American president until the nation is given the chance to elect one. Jackson says that an African American candidate may get support from women, Hispanics and American Indians; that many groups in society can identify with his candidacy. Jackson mentions the Rainbow Coalition. Jackson notes that he is running second or third out of eight candidates in New Hampshire. Lydon asks Jackson about his success in life and about his belief in self-reliance. Jackson says that the "triangle" of family, church, and school allowed him to grow up with a sense of confidence; that he was insulated from some of the ill effects of segregation. Jackson mentions the closeness of his family to a particular white family, despite living in a segregated society. 1:11:19: V: Lydon asks Jackson how to foster good support networks for young African Americans growing up today. Jackson says that young African Americans need to work harder than whites to succeed; that their hard work will pay off in the end; that those who work hard to succeed develop an inner strength and character. Bode notes that the Alabama Democratic Conference endorsed Walter Mondale's candidacy for US President. Bode adds that Jackson's political organization said that their endorsement of Mondale was the equivalent of "putting another bullet into the body of Martin Luther King." Jackson denies characterizing the endorsement in that manner. Jackson talks about the reluctance of the African American community to upset the status quo. Jackson says that some of the resistance to the civil rights movement came from conservative African Americans. Bode asks Jackson what percentage of the vote he expects to receive in the Alabama primary. Jackson says that he will not speculate on percentages. Jackson talks about the endorsements and support he has received. Jackson says that he has received support from white voters in the south; that whites, African Americans, and other minorities are finding common ground in his candidacy. 1:15:38: V: Farney asks why Jackson sometimes refers to himself as a "prophet" instead of a "politician." Jackson explains that his role is prophetic in that he tries to change the structure of society. Farney notes that Jackson has been criticized for a lack of administrative experience. Jackson reviews the accomplishments of his political organization. Jackson notes the limited budget under which his campaign operates. Farney asks about Jackson's political legacy. Jackson says that his candidacy has forced the Democratic Party to open up; that his candidacy has forced both political parties to understand the importance of minority voters. Lydon asks about Jackson's spiritual life. Jackson says that he tries to seek common ground between people of different religions; that certain values are held in common by all religions. Jackson says that he is committed to the poor, the elderly and the young. Lydon asks Jackson why Ralph Abernathy (African American leader) said that Jackson could be his president but not his pastor. Jackson says that he does not know why Abernathy said that. Bode comments that Jackson has not held political office, but that he has had a lot of contact with politicians. Jackson notes that he was the first African American delegate to the Democratic Party in 1962. Jackson reviews his leadership experience and his role in shaping public policy in the 1960s and 1970s. 1:20:55: V: Bode asks Jackson which politicians he admires, aside from Martin Luther King. Jackson talks about Hubert Humphrey (US Senator), Ron Dellums (US Representative), and Adam Powell (US Representative). Bode notes that Jackson has criticized Tip O'Neill (Speaker, US House of Representatives) and Lane Kirkland (President, AFL-CIO). Bode asks how Jackson will deal with the Democratic leadership. Jackson says that he will conduct business with these leaders on the basis of "mutual respect." Jackson says that the Democratic Party needs a more articulate spokesman than O'Neill; that he respects O'Neill. Jackson notes that the labor movement needs to commit itself to providing equal access to jobs for African Americans, Hispanics, and women. Lydon asks Jackson about how his candidacy is viewed by American Jews. Jackson says that he would like to establish better relations between African American and Jewish leaders. Jackson says that he regrets the conflicts between African Americans and Jews in the past; that he supports the right of Israel to exist; that he also supports the rights of Palestinians. Jackson talks about his view of the Middle Eastern conflict. Farney notes that Jimmy Carter (former US President) was elected as an "outsider." Farney asks if Jackson would be more successful than Carter in operating in politics as an "outsider." Jackson says that Carter remained on the "outside" as president; that Carter did not use the power of the presidency to its full extent. Jackson says that he disagrees with the critics who call the Carter administration a "failure." Jackson criticizes the foreign policy of Ronald Reagan (US President). 1:26:29: V: Bode asks Jackson about his advisors. Jackson says that he consults with his wife and his children. Jackson names a list of people with whom he consults including Dellums, Marion Barry (mayor of Washington D.C.), Walter Fauntroy (US Congressman), Edward Bennett Williams (attorney), Dr. Al Pitcher (University of Chicago), and Dr. Jack Mendelsohn (minister). Lydon asks Jackson to disclose any major failures or flaws in his character. Jackson says that he does not dwell on his failures, but that he has learned a lot from them. Jackson says that he regrets how the civil rights movement broke up in the 1970s; that he is trying to bring back together the groups involved in the civil rights movement through his coalition. Jackson says that he is concerned with the conflict between African Americans and American Jews. Jackson talks about the importance of communication in resolving conflict. Lydon thanks Jackson, Farney and Bode. End credits roll.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/03/1984
Description: David Boeri reports that Jesse Jackson spoke at the Massachusetts State House about the importance of access to higher education. Boeri notes that some students cannot afford higher education because of the increasing costs of higher education and federal cuts in student aid. Many supporters turned out to listen to Jackson. Jackson talks to the audience about the importance of education. Jackson addresses the media after his speech.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Kevin Sheehan (State Student Association of Massachusetts) talking about college students who must work forty hours per week on top of taking classes. Footage of Mike Ferrigno (State Student Association of Massachusetts) addressing a crowd at the State House about the debt incurred by many students in college. David Boeri reports that many low- and middle-income college students are incurring heavy debt in colleges; that some students can not afford to go to college. V: Shot of students walking on a campus. Boeri reports that speakers at a State House rally attacked federal cuts in federal aid to students. Boeri notes that the cuts come at a time when tuition and the cost of living are increasing; that grants are less easy to obtain. V: Shot of speakers and the audience inside the State House. Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) speaking about the importance of access to education. Boeri reports that Jackson said that universities have let the enrollment numbers fall for African American, minority, and low-income students. V: Shots of the members of the audience, including Mel King (community activist), Bill Owens (former state senator) and Shirley Owens Hicks (state representative). Footage of Jackson urging students to protest cuts in student aid. Jackson condemns the priorities of Ronald Reagan (US President). Jackson says that Reagan is "embarking on a trillion dollar misadventure in space." Jackson tells students that they need to stay sober, fight the Star Wars program and to "vote with Red Sox fever." The audience applauds as members rise to their feet. Footage of Jackson speaking to the media after his speech. Jackson uses the parable of Jesus Christ to illustrate society's obligation to cater to the needs of the poor and needy. Jackson says that many children are "locked out and living in the manger." Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) is visible behind Jackson. Boeri reports that the State Student Association has registered over 5,000 new student voters; that the students will vote for more affordable education in November.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/17/1986
Description: First seven minutes are shots of photographs of community activist Mel King throughout his life. Then Christopher Lydon interviews his wife Joyce King in the kitchen of their home. Joyce says that Mel's parents taught him the importance of sharing with others, and adds that he was very proud of his father, who was active in a union. Joyce talks about Mel's generosity. Lydon asks about the West Indian background of Mel's family, and about his formative years. She says that Mel's family was proud of their West Indian heritage and discusses his experiences while attending college in South Carolina. Joyce says that he learned about racism and oppression while living in South Carolina.
1:00:02: Visual: Shots of black and white photographs of Mel King throughout his life; of Mel King's high school yearbook photograph. 1:06:55: V: Christopher Lydon interviews Joyce King (wife of Mel King) in the kitchen of her home. Lydon asks Joyce King about Mel King's family. Joyce King says that Mel King's family always shared what they had with others; that Mel King's mother was able to make do with the few resources she had. Joyce King says that Mel King's father was active in a union; that Mel King is very proud of his father. Joyce King tells a story about the generosity of Mel King's father. Joyce King says that Mel King has an "open door policy"; that Mel King is not protective of his privacy. Joyce King says that Mel King often brings people to their home. Joyce King says that Mel King often gives clothing or money to those in need; that he does it in a quiet manner. 1:15:06: V: Lydon asks about the West Indian culture of Mel King's family. Joyce King says that Mel King's family is proud of their heritage; that his parents grew up in Barbados; that the family has strong connections to their heritage. Lydon asks about Mel King's formative years. Joyce King says that Mel King's membership in the Church of All Nations was important in his younger years; that Mel King attended a church-sponsored school in South Carolina; that the public school system discouraged African Americans from attending university. Joyce King says that Mel King learned a lot about race and oppression when he was at college in South Carolina; that Mel King traveled through the South as a member of the sports teams at his college. Joyce King says that Mel King returned from South Carolina with ideas about race and the fight against oppression.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/06/1983
Description: Christopher Lydon interviews cultural historian Kiku Adatto (Harvard University) about Jesse Jackson as a presidential candidate. Lydon's interview with Adatto is accompanied by footage of Jackson throughout his political career. The footage illustrates Jackson's dynamic style of speaking. Adatto notes that Jackson is a religious figure in the political arena. She notes that Jackson's energy and moral fervor are more suited to a preacher than a politician. She says that Jackson's strength lies in his ability to articulate social criticism. Adatto says that many voters see Jackson as an outsider or a social critic instead of as a politician; she adds that some voters may not be able to envision him as president. Lydon's report also includes footage of Martin Luther King, Jr. (American civil rights leader) and Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta).
1:00:02: Christopher Lydon interviews Kiku Adatto (Harvard University) about Jesse Jackson (candidate for the Democratic nomination for US President). Adatto talks about the tradition of preachers in American history. She says that many of these preachers, including Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) and Jackson, have become political leaders. Visual: Shot of a black and white photo of Jackson on a balcony with King. Black and white footage of King giving a speech. Shot of a black and white photo of Jackson in a crowd, raising his arm in the black power salute. Adatto says that Jackson has tried to pick up the mantle of King; that Jackson has tried to be the "conscience of America" in the way that King was. V: Footage of Jackson addressing a crowd at Harvard University on April 4, 1985. Jackson talks about the evils of apartheid. Adatto says that there is a tradition in the US of the preacher staying outside of politics; that Jackson has tried to move into the political system in order to effect change. V: Footage of Jackson passing a lobby of a building. He shakes hands with African American bystanders. Jackson enters a room full of supporters. Adatto says that Jackson is concerned with equality and civil rights; that Jackson has been caught exhibiting prejudice against Jews; that Jackson was linked with Reverend Louis Farrakhan (African American Muslim leader). V: Shots of newspaper articles detailing the controversy surrounding Jackson's remarks about Jews in 1984. Adatto adds that the preacher must remain "morally sound" when entering the political arena. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. Adatto says that Jackson has an "insider-outside dilemma"; that Jackson finds it difficult to make the compromises required by electoral politics. Adatto notes that Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) made an easy transition into electoral politics. V: Shot of Young at a press conference in Boston in 1983. Adatto notes that Jackson has lost none of his energy or "moral fervor"; that Jackson still criticizes society from an outsider's point of view. Adatto adds that Young is an "insider." V: Shot of Young at a press conference. Adatto says that Jackson strength lies in his ability to articulate social criticism. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. Shots of audience members. Adatto says that Jackson stirs the emotions of voters in his "outsider" role; that Jackson troubles many voters in his "insider" role. Adatto notes that Jackson's role as social reformer and critic undermines his strength as a presidential candidate; that many voters cannot envision Jackson as president. Adatto notes that many of the nation's great presidents have been calm and quietly strong; that some see Jackson as too much of a preacher; that Jackson's energy and moral fervor are more suited to preacher than politician. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. Adatto says that some see voters as too much of an outsider, social critic or civil rights leader; that some white voters are turned off by Jackson. Adatto quotes statistics from a study which found that 23% of American voters are not ready to vote for any African American for president. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the Democratic Convention in 1984. Adatto says that Jackson has the ability to stir the emotions of the American people; that he is most powerful in his role as "outsider" or critic. Adatto says that many voters are stirred by his message, but cannot envision him as president because he is an outsider. V: Footage of Jackson announcing his candidacy for president in 1988. His supporters stand behind him, cheering. Jackson promises "bold leadership."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/16/1987
Description: Mayoral candidates Mel King and Ray Flynn participate in a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. Flynn talks about his experience in government and his commitment to the public schools. He notes his familiarity with the city and school budgets, and he discusses the importance of public education and public housing. King stresses the importance of early childhood education programs and a "child-centered" school system. King speaks of the need for the mayor to work together with the Boston School Committee. King says that the city must continue to demonstrate its support of integrated schools. King and Flynn respond to a question about requiring students to pass a standardized test in order to graduate. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:05: Visual: Four members of the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) sit at a table on stage at English High School. A member of the CWEC welcomes mayoral candidates Ray Flynn and Mel King to the annual meeting of the CWEC. Flynn and King are seated at a table at the center of the stage. Shots of Flynn and King. The CWEC member says that the candidates and the audience will discuss the future of public education in Boston. 1:01:55: V: Flynn thanks the moderator and the CWEC. Flynn mentions his experience as a state legislator and a member of the Boston City Council. He says that he was a student in the Boston Public Schools. Flynn congratulates the CWEC for their commitment ot public education. Flynn stresses the importance of public education and a good school system. Flynn says that he has a Master's Degree in education from Harvard; that he is committed to education. Flynn says that he would visit a few public schools and a few public housing projects on his first day as mayor; that education and public housing will be major concerns for his administration. Flynn says that the mayor should be involved in public education; that politicians in Boston have distanced themselves from the public schools since desegregation. Flynn says that the mayor should serve as an ex-officio member of the Boston School Committee; that the mayor needs to be aware of the situation in the schools. Flynn says that he is familiar with the city and school budgets. Flynn says that fiscal stability and predictable student placements are important for the schools. The audience applauds. 1:07:56: V: King thanks the audience and the CWEC. King says that the students in the school system must be served from birth to graduation; that early childhood education programs are important. King says that resources must be allocated to support Head Start programs and other early childhood education programs. King says that "child-centered" school system must guarantee education for all students; that the school system must believe that all children can be educated. King says that the mayor must work with the Boston School Committee; that the members of the School Committee will be newly elected; that the mayor and the Boston School Committee must determine the problems and the needs of the school system. King says that the newly elected School Committee must be unified in support of integrated schools. Jump cut in videotape. King says that he would provide leadership on the issue of education; that he would work to create a good climate and to end divisiveness on the issue of education. King says that the Boston Public School System must demonstrate its commitment to integrated education. The audience applauds. 1:14:52: V: An audience member asks if students should pass a standardized test in order to graduate from high school. King says that standards need to be established in the early grades as well as upon graduation. King says that the school administration must be held responsible for the education of the students; that diagnostic testing and evaluation is needed at every grade level, not just upon graduation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/13/1983
Description: Mayoral candidates Ray Flynn and Mel King participate in a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. Flynn says that students graduating from Boston public schools must be prepared to compete in the workplace. He adds that there must be a working relationship between parents, teachers, administrators, and the community. King speaks about the workings of the school administration and advocates the inclusion of parents in the process. King and Flynn respond to questions about how they would have handled school desegregation if they had been mayor at the time. Both candidates answer questions about the role of the mayor upon the court's withdrawal from its supervisory role over the school system and about the school budget. Audience members include John O'Bryant of the Boston School Committee. Tape 2 of 2.
1:00:00: Visual: Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston) speaks at a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. The candidates' forum is held in conjuction with their annual meeting. Flynn says that students graduating from Boston public schools must be able to compete in the workplace. Long shot of candidates on stage from the back of the auditorium. Flynn says that there must be a working relationship between parents, teachers, administrators and the community. The audience applauds. 1:00:56: V: King speaks about the workings of the school administration. Jump cut in the videotape. Shots of John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee); of members of the audience. King says that parents must be included in the workings of the school system. Shot of the candidates on stage. An audience member asks what each candidate would have done about school desegregation if he had been mayor at the time. The audience member also asks about the role of the mayor when the court pulls withdraws from its supervisory role over the school system. King says that community control over schools is important; that community accountablility is an important aspect of community control; that members of the community must be held accountable for the state of neighborhood schools. King says that he had suggested a community approach to schools which could have prevented the kind of sweeping court order imposed by the federal court to accomplish school desegregation. King says that he would have tried to bring people together in support of school desegregation if he had been mayor at the time; that there were many people acting in opposition to the court order at the time of school desegregation. King says that he would provide leadership on the issue of quality, integrated education upon the withdrawal of the court. 1:05:08: V: Flynn responds to the same question about school desegregation. Flynn notes that the State Department of Education will continue to oversee the Boston Public School System after the withdrawal of the court. Flynn says that he will work with the State Department of Education to protect the Constitutional rights of public schoolchildren in Boston. Flynn says that political and moral leadership was absent during school desegregation in Boston. Flynn says that he would have defended the rights and the safety of Boston schoolchildren as mayor, even if he disagreed with the court order. Flynn notes that he was a state legislator at the time of school desegregation; that he was criticized at the time for standing up for his beliefs; that he was criticized for living in a certain community; that he acted responsibly on behalf of all of Boston's schoolchildren at the time. 1:07:15: V: An audience member asks about the school budget. Flynn says that it is important to educate children; that it is more expensive to remedy social problems resulting from poor education. Flynn says that he supported funding for Boston schools even when it was politically unpopular to do so; that he is committed to providing the necessary funds to assure a good school system. Flynn says that accountability is as important as funding; that the school system has too many administrators. King responds to the same question. King says that he is aware of the lack of resources available to teachers and students in the Boston Public School System; that the lack of resources is embarrassing for a school system with a large budget; that the school administrators must make a commitment to provide resources for students and teachers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/13/1983
Description: Douglas Wilder, the Democratic candidate for Governor of Virginia, visits the African Meeting House in Boston. Wilder speaks to Director Ruth Batson. Reporter Marcus Jones notes that Wilder is expected to win the election; he adds that Wilder will become the first African American governor of any state in the nation. Jones reviews Wilder's career. Interview with Wilder at the African Meeting House. He talks about his campaign for governor. Wilder downplays speculation that he could be a presidential candidate in 1992. Jones notes that Wilder is visiting Boston to meet supporters and to raise funds for his campaign. Following the edited story is additional footage of Wilder visiting the Meeting House and footage of Jones's interview with Wilder.
1:00:03: Visual: Footage of L. Douglas Wilder (Democratic candidate for governor of Virginia) autographing his picture for an admirer outside of the African Meeting House on Joy Street in Boston. Shots of Wilder entering the Meeting House; of a group of people following Wilder into the Meeting House. Shot of the exterior of the Meeting House. Marcus Jones reports that Wilder is not a familiar face to Massachusetts voters. V: Footage of Ruth Batson (Director, African Meeting House) speaking informally to Wilder and a small group of people. Batson tells Wilder that he joins a long list of illustrious African Americans to pass through the Meeting House. Wilder says that he was named for Frederick Douglass (Nineteenth-century abolitionist). Shots of Wilder in the Meeting House; of the media in the Meeting House. Jones reports that Wilder is the current Lieutenant Governor of Virginia; that Wilder will become the Democratic nominee for governor of Virginia next month. Jones reports that Wilder is attracting national attention because he is expected to win the election. V: Shot of Wilder examing an exhibit in the Meeting House. Shot of a newspaper headline reading, "Black Virginia Politician rests at brink of history." The article is accompanied by a photo of Wilder. Jones reports that no African American has been elected governor of any state in the US. V: Footage of Wilder being interviewed by Jones at the Meeting House. Wilder says that he had high aspirations when he was young; that he never expected to be in this position when he entered politics in 1969. Wilder says that it is significant for an African American to be the Democratic nominee for governor of Virginia. Jones reports that Wilder is in Boston to meet supporters and to raise money for his campaign. Jones notes that Wilder has tried to remain neutral on racial issues; that 80% of Virginia's electorate is white. V: Shots of a black and white photo in an exhibit at the Meeting House; of Wilder talking to an African American woman as he stands near an exhibit at the Meeting House. Jones reports that Wilder entered politics as a state senator in 1969; that Wilder represented the city of Richmond. Jones notes that Wilder has become more conservative on some issues since 1969; that Wilder has run unopposed for the gubernatorial nomination in Virginia. Jones adds that Wilder is a highly respected member of the Democratic establishment in Virginia; that some predict that Wilder could move into national politics. V: Shot of the newspaper article about Wilder. Footage of Wilder being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks Wilder if he could see himself as president in 1992. Wilder says that he hopes to be enjoying his post as governor of Virginia in 1992. Wilder says that he is concentrating on the gubernatorial race in Virginia; that he thinks he is the most qualified candidate to become governor of Virginia. Shot of Wilder with supporters outside of the African Meeting House.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1989
Description: Stanley Forman's Herald American photographs of Theodore Landsmark being attacked on City Hall plaza by Joseph Rakes and teenage boys from South Boston. Sen. Bill Owens addresses crowd, withdrawing vote of confidence for Kevin White's ability to ease Boston's racial tension and saying that Boston is not a safe city for people of color. Report of the reactions of Robert DiGrazia (police commissioner), Mayor Kevin White, and James Kelly (head of Home and School Association of South Boston).
1:00:17: Steve Nevas reads the news the set of The Ten O'Clock News. Behind Nevas is a photo of Ted Landsmark, after he was attacked at City Hall Plaza. Nevas reports that Boston police have identified four of the men who attacked Landsmark; that one of the youths from South Boston has been arrested for assault and battery; that police have issued a warrant for Joseph Rakes and two others involved in the attack yesterday. Nevas reports that the Massachusetts House of Representatives has passed a resolution condemning the attack; that Governor Michael Dukakis has issued a similar statement. 1:00:57: Pam Bullard reports that a group of white youths attacked Theodore Landsmark (attorney) as he passed through City Hall Plaza on his way to a meeting at City Hall yesterday. Bullard reports that the youths were at City Hall Plaza to protest busing with a group of 250 South Boston and Charlestown students. Visual: Still photographs of the attack on Landsmark at City Hall Plaza by Stanley Forman of the Boston Herald American. Bullard reports that the students involved in the protest were demanding an end to school desegregation; that several people were harassed by the youths at City Hall Plaza; that Landsmark suffered a broken nose and facial lacerations. Bullard reports that the African American community gathered today at City Hall Plaza; that African American leaders condemned police for failing to respond effectively to the attack; that leaders condemned the city's leadership for encouraging the growing violence. V: Footage of a crowd of African Americans and whites gathered at City Hall Plaza. State Senator William Owens addresses the crowd, saying that people of color are not safe in Boston; that people of color from other parts of the nation should stay away from Boston; that people of color must unite against the climate of racism in the city; that people of color in Boston should ask for federal protection because the city has failed to protect them. Bullard reports that African American leaders have accused Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) of encouraging violence by tolerating disruptions in the schools; that African American leaders have condemned the use of City Hall for anti-busing rallies. V: Footage of Owens saying that he is withdrawing his support of White. Bullard reports that African American leaders appear united in the belief that White and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) have broke their promises to the African American community. V: Footage of White on September 3, 1975, saying that no breach of public safety will be tolerated by the city. Footage of DiGrazia on February 16, 1976, saying that violent behavior will not be tolerated; that those participating in violent behavior will be arrested and prosecuted. Bullard reports that White and DiGrazia say that they have not broken any promises; that DiGrazia is confident that Landsmark's attackers will be apprehended; that White had no comment on calls for his resignation by the African American community. Bullard reports that James Kelly (South Boston Home and School Association) blamed the violence on the liberal press. Bullard comments that the racial tension in Boston is worse than it has been in several months; that little effort is being made to ease the tension in the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1976
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson gave a speech at Sanders Theatre at Harvard University as part of his effort to support the presidential campaign of Michael Dukakis. Jackson attacked George Bush and the Republican Party on issues of race, and defended the term "liberal" from Republican attacks. Additional footage of Jackson and Dukakis at the 1988 Democratic Convention. Independent presidential candidate Lenora Fulani also visited Boston today. Fulani is the African American progressive candidate of the New Alliance Party. Interview with Fulani, who says that progressive voters need to vote against Dukakis. She adds that the Democratic Party needs to differentiate itself from the Republican Party in order to win the votes of progressives. Vaillancourt notes that Fulani is a Jackson supporter. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani will probably not be a threat to Dukakis in the 1988 election. She adds that a future Jackson candidacy could threaten the Democratic Party by attracting disenchanted progressive voters from the Democratic Party.
1:00:14: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) addressing an audience at Sanders Theatre at Harvard University. Jackson talks about the civil rights movement. Shots of the audience. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson attacked the Republican Party in his speech at Saunder Theatre today; that Jackson accused the Republicans of misusing the term "liberal" in the presidential campaign. V: Footage of Jackson at Sanders Theatre. Jackson accuses George Bush (Republican US presidential nominee) of attacking civil liberties as "subversive." Jackson riffs on the term "liberal." Shots of the audience applauding for Jackson. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson was campaigning for Michael Dukakis (Democratic US presidential nominee); that Jackson attacked Bush on issues of race. V: Footage of Jackson accusing Bush of buying a property labeled "caucasians only" in Houston. Footage from CNN of Dukakis, Kitty Dukakis (wife of Dukakis), Jackson, Jaqueline Jackson (wife of Jackson), and other Democratic Party leaders on stage at the 1988 Democratic Convention. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson appears frequently with Dukakis; that Jackson defended Dukakis's campaign style in his speech today. V: Footage of Jackson saying that "passion is a new extra-constitutional requirement" for the presidency. Vaillancourt stands outside of Memorial Hall at Harvard University. Vaillancourt reports that Lenora Fulani (Independent candidate for US President) was in Boston today; that Fulani is an African American progressive candidate for the presidency. V: Footage of Fulani being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Fulani says that voters should not vote for Dukakis; that the Democratic Party needs to learn not to take African American and white progressive voters for granted. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani is the candidate of the New Alliance Party. Vaillancourt adds that Fulani describes the New Alliance Party as a progressive party which is mindful of gay and minority voters. V: Footage of Jackson shaking hands with supporters after his speech. Jackson holds up a young white girl. He gives the thumbs-up sign to the crowd. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani is a Jackson supporter; that Fulani is running against Dukakis. V: Footage of Fulani being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Fulani says that progressive voters need to vote according to their own self-interests; she urges progressive voters to vote against Dukakis. Vaillancourt asks if progressive voters should vote for Fulani and risk having a Republican president. Fulani says that the Democratic Party is responsible for the Republican victories of Ronald Reagan (US President) and Richard Nixon (former US President). Fulani says that the Democratic Party needs to differentiate itself from the Republican Party. Fulani says that Dukakis is now paying attention to progressive voters because he is down in the polls. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani will probably not be a threat to Dukakis; that her criticism may signal a future problem for the party. V: Shot of Jackson on stage at the end of his speech. Vaillancourt reports that the Democratic Party would be threatened if a candidate like Jackson decided to run as an independent candidate; that his candidacy would attract disenchanted Democratic voters. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson is still campaigning strongly for Dukakis; that Jackson's campaign efforts make him a force within the Democratic Party.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/24/1988
Description: Richard Boddie is seeking the Libertarian nomination for the 1992 presidential election. Interview with Boddie about the Libertarian Party and his position on the issues. He says that there is no difference between the Democratic and Republican Parties. He talks about the need for government to remove itself from the private lives and economic lives of the citizenry. Boddie calls for reform of the criminal justice system. He says that he will work to empower all people. He accuses other African American politicians of trying to redistribute wealth. Boddie says that the only legitimate function of government is to protect citizens from violations of their rights. Fields notes that the Libertarian nomination is also being sought by Andre Marrou, accompanied by a shot of a photograph of him. Sounds cuts out at the very end of the story. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Charles McKenney interviewed by Marcus Jones and African American officials in white suburbs
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Richard Boddie (Libertarian candidate for US President) being interviewed. Boddie says that people who have no values have no regard for human life. Boddie says that the criminal justice system does not force people to take responsibility for their actions. Boddie says that the criminal justice system lets people avoid responsibility for their actions by placing blame on society. Boddie says that government must not outlaw guns in order to fight crime; that the people must get government out of their lives. Carmen Fields reports that Boddie is fifty-two years old; that Boddie is the son of a minister from Rochester, NY. Fields reports that Boddie does not believe that gun control is the answer to urban crime; that Boddie is seeking the Libertarian nomination for president. Fields notes that the Libertarian Party does not support government involvement in the lives of citizens. V: Footage of Boddie being interviewed by Fields. Boddie says that the government needs to remove itself from the private lives and economic lives of its citizens. Boddie says that the nation would become more productive and competitive with less government; that there would be more opportunities for all with less government. Boddie says that the government protects the class structure. Boddie says that the government is the "elitist power-monger." Boddie says that the government does not follow through on its promises. Fields reports that Boddie has tried bipartisanship; that he was a Democrat for ten years. Fields reports that Boddie was an activist law student at Syracuse University; that Boddie became a Republican shortly after graduating from law school. V: Footage of Boddie being interviewed by Fields. Boddie says that he wanted to build his law practice; that he became a Republican. Boddie says that he spent ten years as a Democrat and ten years as a Republican; that there is no difference between the two parties. Fields reports that Boddie was a "political agnostic" until he discovered the Libertarian Party in 1983. V: Footage of Boddie being interviewed by Fields. Boddie says that the Libertarian Party found him. Fields reports that Boddie has been considering entering politics since the early 1980s; that Boddie promises to be a different kind of African American politician if he wins the Libertarian nomination. Fields notes that the nomination is also being sought by Andre Marrou (Libertarian candidate for US President). V: Shot of a black and white photo of Marrou. Footage of Boddie being interviewed by Fields. Boddie mentions some African American politicians including Jesse Jackson and Douglas Wilder. Boddie says that most African American politicians want to redistribute wealth. Boddie says that he wants people to empower themselves. Boddie says that the role of government should be reduced to defending the rights of citizens when those rights are violated. Boddie says that this is the only legitimate function of government.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/22/1991
Description: In this story on linkage, Christy George gives history of Boston development boom and affordable housing decline. She describes proposed linkage between the two in the form of taxes on new development, the proceeds of which would go toward affordable housing. Kevin White press conference. Interview with Bruce Bolling on his proposed linkage law. Interview with housing advocate Robert McKay, who is also on the committee reviewing the linkage law. There is a discussion of how exactly linkage will work. Kevin White, Ray Flynn, Larry DiCara, and Dave Finnegan all weigh in on linkage as a mayoral campaign issue.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/16/1983
Description: David Boeri reports that the referendum question on the creation of Mandela, Massachusetts, was soundly defeated in the 1986 elections. Supporters of incorporation of a new city from the Greater Roxbury neighborhood are raising the issue again. Community leaders gathered at a press conference in support of the issue. Those present included Andrew Jones (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project), Chuck Turner (teacher), and Byron Rushing (State Representative). Jones and Rushing speak out in favor of Mandela. They criticize the city of Boston for not dealing effectively with problems in the Roxbury neighborhood. Boeri reports that the Roxbury neighborhood is suffering from an epidemic of violence and drug-related crime. He notes that Mandela supporters believe that crime could be fought more effectively if Roxbury were an independent city. Interviews with Mandela supporters Sadiki Kambon and Donald Madrey talking about the problems in the neighborhood. City Councilor Bruce Bolling talks about street violence. Footage of William Celester (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) and Ray Flynn at a press conference.
1:00:09: Visual: Footage of Andrew Jones (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) at a press conference. Supporters stand behind him. Jones says that the time has come to "free Mandela, Massachusetts." Shot of Mandela supporters with Jones including Chuck Turner (teacher). David Boeri reports that the referendum question on Mandela, Massachusetts was overwhelmingly rejected by voters in the 1986 elections. Boeri notes that Mandela supporters are raising the question again. V: Footage of Byron Rushing (State Representative) at the press conference. Rushing asks if it is better to be a poor neighborhood in a rich city, or a poor city in a rich state. Boeri reports that little has changed in Boston's African American neighborhoods since 1986; that Mandela supporters can exploit the fact that little has changed in their favor. Boeri notes that Roxbury may be worse off than it was in 1986. V: Shot of white police officers at a crime scene. Roxbury residents stand behind police cordons. A pool of blood appears on the street. Footage of Sadiki Kambon (Mandela initiative supporter) saying that Roxbury continues to suffer from high unemployment, poor housing, an increase in the infant mortality rate, and a high drop-out rate from schools. Shot of two white police officers patrolling a residential street in Roxbury. Boeri reports that drug-related crime and violence have created a crisis in the community. V: Shot of a Boston Herald newspaper article featuring a photo of Darlene Tiffany Moore (Roxbury resident and shooting victim). Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) speaking to the press on August 22, 1988. Bolling says that there is open warfare going on in the district. Footage of Donald Madrey (Roxbury resident and Mandela initiative supporter) saying that Roxbury residents are living in fear from crime. Madrey says that it seems like all of the drugs in the state of Massachusetts are being dropped in Roxbury. Shot of African American residents crossing Washington street underneath elevated train tracks in Roxbury. Boeri reports that supporters of the Mandela initiative say that crime could be fought more effectively if Roxbury were an independent city. V: Shot of a group of African American men outsde of Joe's sub shop on Washington Street in Roxbury. Footage of Jones at the press conference saying that an independent city has its own police force which can set its own priorities. Jones says that the Boston Police Department is corrupt; that an independent police department could establish a better relationship with the community. Footage of Rushing saying that officers of the Mandela Police Department would live in the city; that the police officers would be living on the streets where crime takes place. Boeri notes that Boston city officials have declared war on drugs and crime in Roxbury. V: Shot of William Celester (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) speaking at a press conference. Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) stands at his side. Shot of two white police officers stopping an African American man in order to search him. Footage of Rushing at the press conference. Rushing says that the city has not responded to questions about why they have not applied for federal funds for anti-drug campaigns in the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/24/1988
Description: Reel 1 of 1983 Boston Mayoral Debate, held at Simmons College. Candidates are Larry DiCara, Ray Flynn, Robert Kiley, Dennis Kearney, David Finnegan and Mel King. The moderator is professor Carroll Miles. Journalists on the panel are Andy Hiller, Michael Rezendes, William Robinson, and J. Jordan. DiCara, Finnegan, Flynn, and Kearney make their opening remarks. Robert Kiley begins his opening remarks.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1983
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Mel King and Jim Roosevelt are among those running to succeed Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill (Speaker of the House) in Massachusetts' 8th Congressional District. Vaillancourt compares the upbringing and careers of both King and Roosevelt, noting that they are not at all alike and that neither has anything in common with O'Neill. Vaillancourt talks about King's political experience and Roosevelt's public service experience and notes that the two candidates, along with Joseph P. Kennedy and George Bachrach are the frontrunners in the race. The report includes footage from interviews with both candidates and with Jim Roosevelt's sister, Anne Roosevelt Johnson. The report also features photographs of the two candidates throughout their careers and footage of both candidates campaigning.
1:00:26: Visual: Footage of Tip O'Neill (Speaker of the US House of Representatives) speaking to veterans at a VFW post in North Cambridge. The veterans applaud O'Neill. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Mel King (community activist) and Jim Roosevelt (candidate for US Congress) are among those running to succeed O'Neill in the 8th Congressional District. Vaillancourt notes that King and O'Neill are not alike; that neither have anything in common with O'Neill. V: Footage of Roosevelt talking about his candidacy at a campaign rally. Footage of King at a campaign rally, saying that he is "a candidate for the people." Vaillancourt says that neither King nor Roosevelt fit into O'Neill's tradition of "clubhouse" politics; that King is courting minority voters and the left; that Roosevelt is campaigning for the votes of affluent professionals. V: Shots of a King campaign sign; of two older white women applauding Roosevelt at a campaign rally. Shots of Roosevelt, King, Joseph Kennedy (candidate for US Congress) and George Bachrach (State Senator) campaigning. Vaillancourt reports that King, Kennedy, Bachrach and Roosevelt are the frontrunners in the race. V: Shot of a black and white photograph of King sitting at a desk. Footage of King talking about his modest family background. He says that his parents were hard workers; that his mother taught him to make clothes; that he sometimes makes the bow ties that he wears today. Shot of a black and white photo of Roosevelt as a boy. Footage of Roosevelt talking about the legacy of his grandfather, Franklin D. Roosevelt (former US President). Vaillancourt reports that Roosevelt has never run for political office; that King is a "perennial candidate." Vaillancourt says that Roosevelt comes from a patrician family with a long political tradition; that King is the son of West Indian immigrants. V: Footage of King campaigning on the street; of Roosevelt campaigning on the street. Shots of black and white photographs of Roosevelt and King as young men; of Roosevelt in a school photo; of King in his high school yearbook. Vaillancourt reports that Roosevelt lives in Cambridge and graduated from Harvard Law School; that King lives in the South End and graduated from all-black Claflin College in South Carolina. V: Shots of Roosevelt's house in Cambridge; of King's home in the South End. Shots of black and white photographs of Roosevelt as a student at Harvard; of King in a group photo at Claflin College. Footage of King greeting a voter at a campaign rally; of Roosevelt shaking hands with voters on the street. Footage of King talking about how his father taught him to share with those who are less fortunate. Shots of black and white photographs of King as a member of a youth basketball team; of King coaching basketball. Vaillancourt reports that King's father was a longshoreman; that his mother was active in the church; that King has held jobs working with youth gangs and as a director of a Settlement House in the South End. V: Footage of King saying talking about working with people. Vaillancourt reports that Roosevelt lived in a monastery for a year after graduating from high school. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Roosevelt as a member of the Order. Footage of Roosevelt saying that he felt a spiritual calling to serve people; that he serves people in a different way now. Roosevelt says that he had difficulty following the vow of obedience. Shot of a black and white photograph of Roosevelt serving in the Navy. Shots of color photographs of Roosevelt in his naval uniform; of Roosevelt campaigning for the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). Vaillancourt talks about Roosevelt's career in public service. Vaillancourt reports that Roosevelt has served on the boards of the Mt. Auburn Hospital and the Cambridge Public Library; that Roosevelt has campaigned for numerous Democratic candidates; that Roosevelt's name garners him a lot of attention. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Roosevelt and O'Neill. Footage of Anne Roosevelt Johnson (Roosevelt's sister) talking about how Roosevelt read the Congressional Record as a boy. Footage of Roosevelt campaigning among the elderly. Footage of King greeting three women at a campaign rally. Vaillancourt talks about King's political experience. Vaillancourt reports that King was a state representative for ten years; that King is a two-time mayoral candidate. V: Footage of Vaillancourt interviewing King. King talks about his record of strong political leadership. King says that he has a stronger record than any of the other candidates. Vaillancourt reports that Roosevelt is using his famous name to take on Joseph Kennedy. V: Footage of Roosevelt signing autographs for children. Shot of a radio engineer. Audio of a Roosevelt campaign radio advertisement. Vaillancourt reports that Roosevelt has been criticized for "Kennedy-bashing." V: Footage of Roosevelt saying that he has been trying to engage Kennedy in a debate on the issues. Vaillancourt reports that Roosevelt has spent $65,000 on radio ads; that King has spent no money on advertising. V: Footage of King campaigning in Roxbury. Shots of a black and white photo of King meeting with white leaders in the 1960s; of King being arrested by police at Tent City in the 1970s. Vaillancourt reports that 90% of voters in the eighth district recognize King's name. Vaillancourt talks about King's involvement in the protest politics of the 1960s and 1970s. V: Footage of Roosevelt saying that King does not represent the viewpoint of most voters in the district. Footage of King saying that his politics are inclusive. Vaillancourt stands on a streetcorner. Vaillancourt reports that King's Rainbow Coalition is well known; that the Rainbow Coalition has not produced any winning candidates; that Roosevelt has support from Cambridge civic activists; that the district includes other areas besides Cambridge. Vaillancourt reports that Kennedy is leading in the polls.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/01/1986
Description: Gail Harris interviews Mel King (candidate for mayor). King discusses his reasons for running for mayor and talks about the issues he considers most important to the city's residents. King answers questions about how he would deal with the city's leaders, the city's power brokers and "the Vault." King talks about the importance of education and training. Harris and King discuss the changes in King's image and manner of dress. King notes the diversity within the African American community; he dismisses the idea of any one candidate receiving 100% of the vote in the African American community. King gives his opinion of Mel Miller (publisher of the The Bay State Banner), who is opposed to King's candidacy. King says that there is no Boston neighborhood in which he feels uncomfortable. King and Harris discuss how to keep racial issues out of the campaign; Harris and King discuss his boycott of an earlier campaign debate because it excluded some candidates. King talks about his goals for the city as mayor. After the interview, while shooting cutaways, King tells Harris about his book, Chain of Change. King talks about his hobbies and about the importance of organizing and empowering people. King gives his opinion of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston).
0:59:57: Visual: Gail Harris interviews Mel King (candidate for mayor). Harris asks King why he is running for mayor. King says that he has lived his whole life in Boston; that he understands the importance of public service; that it is important for the city to take care of its neediest citizens. King says that affordable housing, employment, health care, and education are important issues to many in the city. King says that some residents of Boston are living in unacceptable conditions; that families are living in overcrowded apartments; that some residents are isolated from the mainstream; that homelessness is a problem in the city. Harris asks King how he would deal with the city's leaders and power brokers and "The Vault." King says that he has worked with a cross-section of people in the city over the course of his career; that he worked with the Chamber of Commerce and the Chandler School to develop a training and placement program for women. King says that people are resources; that training can provide skilled workers for big corporations. King says that training is important; that school failure leads to street crime and juvenile delinquency; that lack of education and unemployment are at the root of most social problems. 1:06:20: V: Harris comments that King has changed his look; that he no longer wears a dashiki. King says that he has not changed his position on the issues; that his clothing is not relevant to his ideas. Harris asks if it is possible to get 100% of the vote in the African American community. She notes that the African American community is very diverse. King agrees that the African American community is very diverse. He says that he resents those who say that he needs to get 100% of the African American vote; that no white candidate is assumed to need 100% of the white vote. King says that a racism leads voters to look at the color of his skin instead of his record and his position on the issues. Harris asks what King thinks of Mel Miller (publisher of the The Bay State Banner), who says that the African American community should offer their support to a strong candidate who can support them after becoming mayor. King says that no one pays a lot of attention to Miller; that Miller is opposed to the ERA. King says that African Americans need to fight for what they want and support one another; that Miller has a negative view of white people; that Miller's influence is destructive to the African American community. Harris asks King if there are any parts of the city in which he feels uncomfortable. King says that there is no part of the city in which he is uncomfortable; that he wants to bring the city together; that he wants to reach out to people who disagree with him on the issues. King says that people must be brought together around common issues like employment and improvements to the schools and the city. Harris asks how King would prevent racial issues from entering the campaign, especially if he found himself in a runoff with David Finnegan (candidate for mayor) or Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor). King says that his previous campaigns for public office have always focused on issues; that the diversity of his campaign workers has earned his campaign the nickname of "the rainbow campaign." 1:14:21: V: Harris asks King if he regrets boycotting an earlier campaign debate because two other candidates were not invited to participate. King says that he has no regrets; that candidates must practice the "politics of inclusion." King notes that it is hypocritical for a candidate to promote equal access for all, and then to take part in a public forum which excludes the voices of some. Harris asks him about what he could accomplish as mayor. King says that he could affect real change in the city; that he would concentrate on reducing crime and fighting drugs; that he would appoint a new police commissioner to work with the community and to root out problems in the police force. King says that Joseph Jordan (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) learned about the problems on Sonoma Street by watching television; that the city needs a commissioner who can mobilize the force to fight crime; that Jordan allowed the mayor to use the police force as a political tool in the debates on Proposition 2 1/2 and the Tregor Bill. King says that he would investigate corruption through an audit of the city's programs; that the government needs to make sure that good services are being provided. King notes that the city government must spend the citizen's tax dollars wisely. King says that new resources must be spent for improvements at Boston City Hospital; that some employees at the hospital qualify for public assistance because their salaries are so low. Harris asks King if he would campaign for mayor even if he knew there was no chance of victory. King says that he has many forums through which to promote his ideas; that he has published a book recently. King says that he would not run if he didn't think he could win; that he would not want to waste his own time and valuable time and money of others; that he thinks he can win and effect real change in the city. 1:20:55: V: Harris thanks King and closes the interview. The crew takes cutaway shots of Harris and King. King tells Harris about his book, Chain of Change. King talks about his hobbies. King talks about the importance of organizing and empowering people. He talks about organizing tenants through the Symphony Tenants Organizing Project. Harris tells King about her impressions of Boston politics. She mentions Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) and Clarence Jones (former Deputy Mayor of Boston). King says that he did not support White in 1975 or 1979; that White has taken the African American vote for granted; that White has not delivered services to the African American community.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/19/1983
Description: Barney Frank (US Representative) and Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) shake hands in front of the Massachusetts State House. Frank has endorsed King for mayor of Boston. Christy George interviews King in front of the State House. King talks about the current policies of the White administration and White's recent appointments to the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). King says that his administration would eliminate the BRA in order to consolidate city development under a community development office. King criticizes White for making mayoral appointments without regard for his successor. King adds that the current police commissioner must be forced to resign. King says that the Boston City Council should not approve White's new housing proposal. He adds that the City Council should wait until the next mayor is elected before making new policy.
1:00:05: Visual: Mel King stands in front of the State House with his supporters and talks to the media about his candidacy for mayor. He talks about the "politics of inclusion." A reporter asks King how he feels about being "Barney Frank's second choice." King says that Barney Frank (US Representative) makes good choices; that he is glad to be one of Frank's choices. Mel King thanks the media. He shakes hands with Frank. Frank and King speak to one another. 1:01:12: V: Christy George sets up an interview with King. George asks King if Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is consolidating power. She also asks him about mayoral appointments to city jobs. King says that political patronage is unfortunate; that White has not considered his appointments from the viewpoint of his successor. King says that the police commissioner must be asked to resign; that the new administration must work around the commissioner if he refuses to resign. George comments that the business community is wary of King and Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston). She asks if White is making appointments to the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) before the mayoral elections in order to satisfy the business community. King says that the new administration must take a balanced approach to development; that the needs of the whole city must be considered. King says that his administration would consolidate the development functions of the city; that his administration would work to eliminate the BRA board as it is now; that a community development office would oversee development in the neighborhoods and in the downtown area. George notes that White's appointments to the BRA are not unusual for a mayor leaving office. King says that these candidates will be "holdovers"; that "holdover" appointments should only be allowed for a minimum period of time; that these appointments undermine public confidence in government. George asks King about White's plans to create a Neighborhood Housing Trust. King says that he hopes that the Boston City Council will not approve the program until a new mayor has been elected. King says that he will lobby the council not to approve the program. George ends the interview.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/21/1983
Description: Campaigners hold Mel King for Mayor signs in English, Chinese, and Spanish, and sell t-shirts and caps outside Concord Baptist Church in South End. King gets out of limousine with Jesse Jackson. Inside they shake hands and raise linked arms before Rainbow Coalition press conference. King introduces Jackson as “country preacher.” Jackson recounts 20 years of progress in America toward freedom and equality. He commends King for his efforts to leverage power of black people, and endorses him for mayor of Boston. King presents Jackson with a copy of King's book, Chain of Change. Jackson takes questions about the role of minorities in the Democratic Party and his potential campaign for the 1984 Democratic presidential nomination. reel 1 of 2.
1:00:04: Visual: Campaign workers for Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston), many of them white, hold campaign signs and sell T-shirts and buttons outside of the Concord Baptist Church in the South End. A campaign worker models his own King T-shirt, which has a campaign slogan in English, Spanish and Chinese. He helps customers find sizes among the multicolored shirts, which are displayed on a table. An Asian woman arrives with a King campaign sign in Chinese. Shot of Mel King baseball caps displayed along a fence. More campaign workers arrive with signs. Shot of the church, with campaign workers standing on the sidewalk and in the street. A truck mounted with two speakers drives along the street. The driver speaks into a microphone, alerting passersby to the arrival of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader). 1:04:11: V: A limousine pulls up outside of the church. King and Jackson exit the limousine and stand in the street. The crowd applauds and cheers, "We want Mel." 1:05:04: V: Jackson and King stand before the media in a room set up for a press conference. They shake hands and raise linked arms. King and Jackson sit down at a table at the front of the room. King gets up and stands at a podium. He welcomes the audience and introduces Jesse Jackson. King commends Jackson's struggle for equality on behalf of minorities and the disenfranchised. King refers to Jackson as a "country preacher." 1:08:10: V: Jackson stands at the podium. He talks about the civil rights movement and the struggle for equal access for all minorities. Jackson says that no one must be denied access or participation because of their race, sex, or religion. Jackson talks about the need for equal protection under the law. Jackson says that voting irregularities must be eliminated; that the Voting Rights Act must be enforced. Jackson says that King has a good combination of experience, integrity, and intelligence; that Massachusetts is ready for a change. Jackson congratulates King on the organization of a Rainbow Coalition in Massachusetts. King presents Jackson with a copy of his book, Chain of Change. Jacson and King and King's supporters raise linked arms while the crowd cheers. 1:14:09: V: Shot of an African American man in the audience. Jackson and King take questions from the audience. An audience member asks Jackson about the possibility of his running for president as an independent candidate, or of his supporting an independent candidate. Jackson says that it is too soon to answer the audience members questions; that the Democratic Party reflects its membership. Jackson says that there must be reciprocal voting within the Democratic Party; that white voters must vote for minority candidates if minority candidates vote for white candidates; that there must be integrated slates of candidates. Jackson says that voting irregularities can be used to keep people from the polls; that voting irregularities must be eliminated. Jackson says that he has two objectives: to achieve parity and to fight Reagan. Jackson adds that a King victory in Boston accomplishes both of his objectives. The audience applauds. Another audience member asks Jackson if he will run for president. Jackson says that he is considering a campaign for the Democratic Party nomination. An audience member asks Jackson about Boston's reputation as a racist city. Jackson says that the United States is "schizophrenic" on the question of race. Jackson reviews some high and low moments concerning race and the African American community in Boston. Jackson says that King's candidacy is a "high moment." An audience member asks a question about voter turnout.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/06/1983
Description: Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) speaks at a campaign rally on behalf of Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) at the Concord Baptist Church in the South End. Jackson endorses King's candidacy. King answers a question about the role of newly registered voters in his campaign. The audience cheers for the two men and chants "Win Mel win," and "Run Jesse run." Tape 2 of 2.
1:00:00: Visual: Jesse Jackson (African-American political leader) speaks at a campaign rally on behalf of Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston). Jackson says that Boston voters have an opportunity to vote for a Rainbow Coalition candidate for mayor. Shots of audience members. A reporter asks if newly registered voters will make a difference in the mayoral election. Mel King says that new voters and old voters will vote for him if they want an accessible and caring city. Shot of Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Dr. Alvin Poussaint (Harvard University) standing in the audience. A moderator thanks the audience. Shot of Gail Harris (WGBH reporter) in the audience. 1:01:18: V: An audience in a church cheers for Jackson and King. Jackson and King are at the front of the church. Shots of the members of the audience as they cheer and clap. The audience chants, "Win, Mel, Win" and "Run, Jesse, Run." Shot of a sign hanging on the front of the church balcony. The sign reads, "Mel King is the key in 1983." The audience applauds for a speaker.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/06/1983
Description: Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) attends a meeting of the Tent City Corporation, chaired by Joan Tighe (chairwoman, Tent City Corporation), regarding the development of the Tent City site. Tighe says that the group will work to maintain affordable housing units at the site and to scale down a proposed plan for a parking garage on the site. Crowd sings happy birthday to Tinghe. Christy George interviews King about his position on housing issues and those of his opponents Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston) and David Finnegan (candidate for mayor of Boston). King criticizes condominium conversions and talks about the need for a strong rent control program. King discusses the link between employment and housing, and says that the community needs more low- and moderate-income housing units. King notes that the federal government is not aware of the housing crisis across the nation; he adds that the federal government needs a better housing policy.
1:00:04: Visual: Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) enters a room where a meeting about the Tent City Development is being held. White and African American attendees sit on either side of a long table. King greets a few of the attendees, then sits down near a window at the side of the room. Joan Tighe (chairwoman, Tent City Corporation) reviews the goals of the Tent City Corporation. Tighe says that the Tent City Corporation aims to be the sole developer of the Tent City site; that they will work with the mayor to maintain affordable housing units at the site; that they will work to scale down a proposed plan for a parking garage. The meeting is adjourned. Meeting members tidy up the room. King greets the attendees. Meeting members and King sing "Happy Birthday" to Tighe. King continues to greet attendees. 1:05:22: V: Christy George interviews King. She asks him about his position on housing and about the positions of his opponents Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston) and David Finnegan (candidate for mayor of Boston). King talks about the need for a strong rent control program and criticizes condominium conversions. King says that new public housing must be built. King says that there is a link between jobs and housing; that people need employment in order to afford housing. King says that the city and the voters must lobby the federal government for a better housing policy. George asks about the differences between King's position and the positions of Flynn and Finnegan. King says that housing must be community-based; that the community needs low- and moderate-income housing. King says that there are other housing issues besides rent control and condominium conversion; that public housing must be protected and improved; that the city must work to provide more housing. King says that he would like to investigate the possibility of a city-wide housing and finance program. King adds that the federal government needs to be aware of the housing crisis across the nation; that the nation needs a good federal housing program. George comments that there are differences between King's position and Finnegan's position. She asks about the differences between King's position and Flynn's position. King says that he has been involved with groups like the Tent City Corporation, who have worked to provide housing. King notes that Flynn has not advocated for a federal approach to the housing crisis. King talks about the need for a tenant equity program in Boston. George thanks King and closes the interview. The crew takes cutaway shots of George and King. George and King speak informally.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/19/1983
Description: Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston), accompanied by 15 supporters of all ages, greets and talks with residents in a housing project. King walks through the streets with children and adult supporters. The children hold campaign signs and chant "Vote for Mel King" and "Mel King for mayor." A campaign truck voices support for King. King greets drivers in their cars.
1:00:06: V: Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) walks across a parking lot and continues down a street. King is surrounded by 15 supporters of all ages. Supporters on the street hold campaign signs for King. A campaign truck drives slowly down the street; the driver voices support for King over the loudspeaker. King enters the front door of an apartment in a housing project. His supporters wait for him outside. King exits the project and crosses the street to the housing project on the other side. King walks through the project, shaking hands with passersby and greeting people. King encourages people to come out of their houses to talk to him. A man comes out to his front stoop to talk to King. King continues to walk through the project, greeting people. 1:03:25: V: King greets and shakes hands with four young African American men. King continues to walk through the projects, followed by his supporters. He greets two older women. 1:04:15: V: King approaches the Shawmut Variety store. His young supporters chant, "Vote for Mel King." King greets people as he passes them in the street. King greets drivers as they sit in their car at a red light. He gestures to his young supporters to stay on the sidewalk. King continues to greet drivers in their cars as they pass by on the street. His young supporters chant, "Mel King for mayor."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/01/1983
Description: Christopher Lydon interviews Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) in King's home. King talks about the benefits of growing up in a diverse neighborhood and about his own childhood in Boston. Lydon asks King about his philosophy of government. King says that the government must serve those who are most in need; he adds that the government should take an active role in issues of poverty, education, the environment, and women's issues. King talks about the interconnectedness of different issues and problems. Lydon asks whether there is an ideology behind King's politics. King says that he tries to take a realistic approach to government. King believes that love and change are the two fundamentals of life. Lydon asks how King rates himself as an administrator. King says that he is a good administrator who tries to identify problems and work together with people to find solutions. The tape includes shots of the exterior of King's home.
1:00:01: V: Shots of the exterior of the King home in the South End. 1:01:10: V: Christopher Lydon sets up an interview with Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) in King's home. Lydon asks King about his political formation on the streets where he grew up. King talks about growing up in the diverse "New York streets" neighborhood of Boston. King says that he grew up with an appreciation for other cultures. Lydon and the camera crew discuss the set-up of the shot. King continues to talk about his experiences growing up on Seneca Street. King says that diverse urban neighborhoods provide a model for cooperation among groups of different backgrounds. King talks about the benefits of growing up with people of different cultures and ethnicities. 1:05:41: V: Lydon asks King about his philosophy of government. King says that government must serve those who are most in need; that all of society benefits when the neediest are served. King says that government must serve society's needs in the areas of poverty, education, the environment, and women's issues. King says that government must serve the needs of all people. He uses the example of access for the disabled. King says that all of society is guaranteed access when access is granted to the disabled. King says that problems in Boston's neighborhoods cannot be ignored; that these problems must be solved before they spread to other areas. King says that problems in one neighborhood affect every resident of the city. King stresses the connections between people and problems. He gives an example of the local problems caused by the oil crisis in the 1970s. 1:11:46: V: Lydon asks if there is an ideology behind King's politics. King says that his approach to government is realistic; that there is no "pure" form of government. King says that he has tried to address the realities of his life as an African American man living in Boston; that he has tried to address the realities and needs of his community and his city. King says that there are essential needs which must be met; that he has tried to look at the forces impacting the needs of people and communities. King says that love and change are the two fundamentals of life. 1:15:35: V: Lydon asks King to rate himself as an administrator. King says that he tries to identify problems; that he gathers people together to find creative solutions; that he works with people to implement solutions; that he tries to evaluate the solution to find out if it works. King talks about using this approach as director of the Urban League of Boston. King says that he is using this approach to solve problems in his current job at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). King says that a city government must deliver services efficiently on a fixed budget. King notes that Joseph Jordan (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) has provided ineffective leadership for the Boston Police Department. King says that it is important to appoint good administrators for city programs. King notes that he has proven experience as a good administrator.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1983
Description: Christopher Lydon interviews Mel King (Boston mayoral candidate) in his home. Lydon asks King about his experiences and strengths as a social worker. King says that he believes in empowering people and encouraging them to solve their own problems. King answers questions about similarities between his background and the background of Ray Flynn (Boston mayoral candidate). King says that Flynn has adopted a "me, too" approach to politics. King emphasizes his own commitment to diversity and says that he has taken the lead on many issues. Lydon asks King whether Flynn has learned from him. Lydon also asks King about his silent nature. King says that there is thought and reflection behind his silences. Some sound interference at the end of the interview. Tape 2 of 2 Editor's note: Content given off the record was edited out of this footage.
1:00:30: Visual: Christopher Lydon interviews Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) in his home. Lydon asks King to describe his experiences and strengths as a social worker. King says that it is important to help people in need; that it is important to feel good about yourself in order to feel good about other people; that people feel good when they can solve their own problems. King talks about his work with the Symphony Tenants Organizing Project. King says that he encouraged the tenants to use their skills to solve problems. King says that it takes a lot of people to effect change. King says that he is inspired by the actions of Rosa Parks (African American civil rights activist); that the civil rights movement required the participation of many. King says that he believes in empowering people to solve their own problems. 1:04:57: V: Lydon asks King about similarities between his background and the background of Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston). King says that he has never remarked on similarities between him and Flynn; that Flynn has adopted a "me, too" approach to politics which leads people to see similarities between them. King says that their experiences and worldviews are vastly different; that Flynn's positions are narrower and more parochial. King notes that Flynn does not live in a diverse community; that his legislative achievements are different than Flynn's legislative achievements; that Flynn has not pushed for the same kind of programs. Lydon asks if Flynn has learned from King. King says that people are aware of his successes. King notes that he is usually out in front on the issues; that Flynn has not been out in front on the issues. King adds that he filed the first bills dealing with housing displacement and condominium conversion; that Flynn lagged behind him on this issue. King says that his politics have been informed by the issue of oppression. King says that he and Flynn come from different places in respect to the issue of oppression. 1:12:05: V: Lydon asks King what is behind King's silence. King says that there is thought and reflection behind his silence; that he expresses his anger at oppression through action. King says that he likes to think about the causes of problems and the solutions to problems. The crew takes cutaway shots of Lydon and King. Lydon says that King should consider Flynn as a student; that Flynn needs to learn from King, even if he wins the election. King and Lydon speak informally about the staffing of Flynn's administration in the event of a Flynn victory. Lydon asks King if he would consider working for a Flynn administration.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/03/1983
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson defeated Michael Dukakis in the Michigan caucuses. Jackson's performance exceeded the expectations of political analysts and has led them to consider the possibility of Jackson winning the Democratic nomination. Some analysts are questioning the state of the Dukakis campaign. Interviews with Robert Kuttner (author of The Life of the Party) and Leslie Dach (Dukakis campaign). Kuttner says that Jackson appeals to working class voters. Dach defends the Dukakis campaign and adds that Dukakis has a strong base of support. Vaillancourt notes that the Democratic establishment would be shaken by a Jackson victory. Interview with Jeffrey Garin (Democratic Party pollster). Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Charlene Drew Jarvis (delegate to the Democratic convention) on the MacNeil Lehrer Newshour and footage of Jackson and Dukakis campaigning.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) campaigning in Connecticut. Supporters chant, "Win, Jesse, Win." Shot of Jackson holding a young white girl. Jackson gives the thumbs-up sign to supporters. Shots of Jackson supporters; of Jackson addressing supporters at a campaign rally. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson did well in the Michigan primary election; that Jackson won the African American vote; that Jackson won 20% of the white vote. V: Footage of Robert Kuttner (author of The Life of the Party) saying that none of the white candidates have "touched a nerve." Kuttner says that Jackson appeals to voters because he represents the average working man and woman. Vaillancourt reports that Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential candidate) did not do as well as Jackson in Michigan. Vaillancourt notes that Dukakis does not appeal to working class people. V: Shots of Dukakis at a campaign rally. Footage of Kuttner saying that Jackson's message is appeals to working class voters more than the messages of other Democratic candidates. Footage of Leslie Dach (Dukakis campaign) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Dach says that Dukakis has a strong base of support. Shots of Dukakis; of Jackson with supporters and press. Vaillancourt reports that one news network predicts that Jackson and Dukakis are in a tie for delegates; that the Democratic Party must face the possibility of a Jackson victory. V: Footage of Jeffrey Garin (Democratic Party Pollster) saying that the Democratic Party will have a hard time facing a Dukakis defeat. Footage of Kuttner being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Kuttner says that the Democratic establishment is afraid of a Jackson victory. Shots of Jackson with supporters at a campaign rally. Footage of Kuttner saying that the economic self-interest of many voters is stronger than racism. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson must convince voters that he can run a government; that Dukakis must convince voters that he has enough passion. V: Footage of Dach saying that the voters will choose the candidate who can deliver on his promises. Shot of Jackson at a campaign rally. Vaillancourt reports that there are questions about the loyalty of some Dukakis supporters. V: Shot of Dukakis campaigning. Footage from The MacNeil Lehrer Newshour of Charlene Drew Jarvis (delegate to the Democratic convention) saying that she will not reveal how she will vote at the convention. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis's loss in Michigan raises questions about his campaign; that Jackson's success leads analysts to wonder if he could win in a general election.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/28/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the race for the second Suffolk senatorial seat between candidates Bill Owens and Royal Bolling, Sr. Jones. He notes that Owens held the seat from 1974 to 1982, when Bolling, Sr. won the seat. Jones notes that both candidates come from prominent families in the African American community. Jones reviews the history of both families' involvement in city and state politics. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of Owens and Bolling, Sr. at a campaign debate and by footage of members of both families. This tape contains additional footage of the campaign debate between Owens and Bolling, Sr.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of William Owens (candidate for State Senate) at a campaign debate. Owens talks about the need for a senator to establish himself as independent from any party affiliation. The crowd applauds. Footage of Royal Bolling, Sr. (State Senator) saying that he has accomplished more in four years than Owens accomplished in the previous twelve years. Owens and Bolling are pictured at a campaign debate. Marcus Jones reports that this campaign marks the fourth time that Owens and Bolling have competed for the second Suffolk Senatorial Seat. Jones notes that the district was created in 1974 to afford minorities the opportunity to elect a minority representative to the Senate. V: Shots of the audience at the campaign debate; of campaign signs for Bolling and Owens. Jones reports that Owens beat Bowling for the seat in 1974 and 1976. Jones notes that Owens switched his party affiliation to Republican in 1982 to protest the fact that he was ignored by the leadership of the Massachusetts Democratic Party. Jones reports that Bolling beat Owens in the 1982 elections. V: Shot of Owens. Footage of Bolling saying that Owens claims to be independent of everyone; that no one can be independent of everyone. Bolling talks about the need to cooperate with the other Senators to push for legislation. Shots of the audience members. Jones reports that Bolling has been accused of being too close to Democratic Party leadership; that Owens is seen as too independent by some. Jones notes that the election has turned into a struggle for leadership between two prominent African American families. V: Footage of a young African American man saying that Owens's campaign was helped by the election of Shirley Owens Hicks (Owens' sister) to the House of Representatives. Footage of a middle-aged African American man saying that he can understand why politicians from prominent families campaign on their family name. Jones reports that the Bolling family has been politically active since Bolling won a seat in the House of Representatives in 1960; that his son Royal Bolling, Jr. was elected in 1972. V: Shot of Bolling Sr. preparing to speak in front of a legislative committee. Shot of Bolling, Jr. at a press conference. Jones notes that Bolling, Jr. lost his bid for an eighth consecutive term in the House of Representatives to Shirley Owens Hicks. V: Shot of Shirley Owens Hicks in a meeting of the Boston School Committee; of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) addressing a crowd. Jones adds that Bruce Bolling (member of the Bolling family) has been a successful Boston City Councillor. V: Footage of Bolling, Sr. saying that Owens has been afraid to make a stand when he thinks that the stand might be "adverse." Footage of Owens saying that no one has ever been confused about where he stands on the issues. The crowd applauds. Jones stands in front of campaign signs for Bolling, Sr. and Owens. Jones reports that an Owens victory would signal a sweep of the legislative elections by the Owens family; that an Owens victory would signal the first time that a Bolling family member has not represented the districts of Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/23/1986
Description: Carmen Fields reports that the Ballot Commission must determine whether several dozen signatures included in the nominating papers of Bill Owens are valid. If the signatures are invalidated, Owens' name will not appear on the primary ballot for the second Suffolk County seat, the only district ever to be held by an African American. Interview with Owens about his nomination papers and about the election. Owens attends a hearing of the Ballot Commission. Owens's main rival for the seat, Royal Bolling, Sr., will not appear on the ballot, because Bolling did not file nominating papers on time. Interview with Bolling, Sr. about his failure to file nomination papers on time. Fields notes the ongoing political competition between the Owens and Bolling families, although both candidates deny that the rivalry between the families is serious. Fields' report includes footage of Owens and Bolling, Sr. at a campaign debate in 1986 and footage of Bolling, Sr. at a legislative hearing. Fields' report also includes footage of Shirley Owens Hicks (sister of Bill Owens) at a Boston School Committee meeting and footage of Royal Bolling, Jr. at a press conference with Byron Rushing (State Representative) and Andrew Jones (community activist). Sounds cuts out at the end of the video. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Hope Kelly interviews Barbara Arnwine about housing desegregation in Boston
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of officials at a Ballot Commission Hearing on June 20, 1988. One official challenges the validity of signatures on a petition. Officials argue over whether the signatures should be counted. Carmen Fields reports that the Ballot Commission must decide on the validity of several dozen signatures included in the nominating papers of Bill Owens (candidate for State Senator). Fields notes that Owens's name will not appear on the primary ballot if the signatures are found to be invalid. V: Footage of Owens discussing the case with an African American woman. Owens says that 24 signatures are being challenged; that 18 or 19 signatures must be ruled invalid in order for his name to be kept off the ballot. Fields reports that Owens is running for the second Suffolk County seat in the State Senate; that the seat in question is the only seat ever held by an African American. V: Shots of traffic on a street in an African American neighborhood of Boston. An African American family crosses the street. Fields reports that the district includes Blue Hill Avenue, Mattapan, the South End, parts of Dorchester, and Jamaica Plain. Fields reports that Owens held the seat for four terms beginning in 1974; that Owens's main rival for the seat is Royal Bolling, Sr. (State Senator). V: Shots of signatures on a nominating petition; of Owens and Bolling at a campaign debate in October of 1986. Footage of Owens at the Ballot Commission Hearing. Owens says that he has won the seat twice; that Bolling has won the seat twice. Owens notes that Bolling failed to file his nominating papers for the seat. Fields reports that Bolling's name will not appear on the primary ballot because he failed to file his qualifying signature petitions. V: Footage of Bolling being interviewed by Fields. Bolling says that he forgot to file his petition on time because he was too involved in other issues. Shot of Bolling addressing a legislative hearing at the State House. Fields reports that Bolling plans to run a sticker campaign in both the Republican and Democratic state primary elections. V: Footage of Bolling saying that voters will have to support him through the sticker campaign. Fields reports that Owens was defeated by Bolling in 1982 after Owens switched from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party. V: Footage of Owens at the Ballot Commission Hearing, being interviewed by Fields. Owens says that Bolling is trying to manipulate voters in the Republican Party into voting for him; that Bolling will return to the Democratic Party if he is elected. Owens says that he switched to the Republican Party because of his differences with the leadership of the Democratic Party. Owens says that he tried unsuccessfully to build a liberal wing of the Republican Party. Fields notes that Shirley Owens Hicks (sister of Bill Owens) defeated Royal Bolling, Jr. in a race for a seat in the Massachusetts House of Representatives. V: Shots of Owens Hicks at a Boston School Committee meeting; of Royal Bolling, Jr. outside of the Massachusetts State House with Byron Rushing (State Representative) and Andrew Jones (African American activist and journalist). Fields say that both candidates deny that there is a serious rivalry between the two families. V: Footage of Bolling saying that there is no feud between the two families; that both families are involved in the political process.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Massachusetts State Legislature has passed a bill designating the city of Quincy as the location for the new headquarters of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA). Parcel 18 in Roxbury had been chosen as the initial site for the headquarters. Speaker of the House George Keverian and House leadership in the chambers of the House of Representatives. Mayor Ray Flynn , City Councilor Bruce Bolling, and Parcel 18 supporters at a press conference outside of the Massachusetts State House. Flynn and Bolling express their support for Parcel 18. Flynn says that the legislature's decision has undermined public confidence in the government. Governor Michael Dukakis has vetoed the bill designating Quincy as the MWRA site at a press conference. Interview with Reverend Tony Bethel of the Parcel 18 Task Force, who says that he and his supporters will continue to fight for economic justice for Roxbury. Footage of the building in Quincy proposed to house the MWRA.
1:00:12: V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) at a press conference outside of the Massachusetts State House. Bolling says that state legislators need to stand with the supporters of Parcel 18; that the supporters of Parcel 18 are on the "correct side." Shots of a crowd of Parcel 18 supporters gathered outside of the State House for the press conference. The supporters hold signs reading, "Parcel-to-parcel linkage" and "Roxbury equals economic opportunity." Marcus Jones reports that the Massachusetts state legislature has passed a bill which designates the city of Quincy as the location for the new headquarters of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA). Jones notes that the bill overrules the MWRA's initial decision to build their headquarters on Parcel 18 in Roxbury. V: Footage of George Keverian (Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives) and the House leadership at the front of the chambers of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Shots of the exterior of the Ruggles MBTA station in Roxbury; of the Boston skyline from Parcel 18 in Roxbury. Jones reports that Quincy legislators pushed for the MWRA to settle in an aging industrial building near the site of a sludge facility. V: Shots of officials climbing the stairs of an industrial building in Quincy; of the interior of the building. Shots of the sludge facility in Quincy. Jones notes that Parcel 18 supporters say that the battle is not yet over. V: Shots of demonstrators at the press conference outside of the State House. Shot of a sign reading, "Keep the MWRA in Roxbury." Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) saying that the legislature's decision jeopardizes the citizens' confidence government. Flynn says that the legislature has not shown a commitment to "straightforward, honest government." Shot of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) signing a piece of paper at a press conference. Members of the media photograph him. Jones reports that Dukakis vetoed the legislature's MWRA bill yesterday; that the legislature will vote next week on Dukakis's veto. Jones reports that Parcel 18 supporters will lobby for the Roxbury site over the next week. V: Shot of the press conference outside of the State House. Shots of demonstrators and audience members at the press conference. A demonstrator holds up a sign reading, "Fairness equals a vote for Roxbury." Footage of Bolling saying that Quincy was not chosen to be the initial site because Quincy did not have the best proposal.The crowd applauds for Bolling. Footage of the Reverend Tony Bethel (Parcel 18 Task Force) being interviewed by Jones outside of the State House. Bethel says that he and his supporters will continue to fight for economic justice for the Roxbury area, even if Dukakis' veto is overruled. Jones reports that Parcel 18 supporters have vowed to continue the fight to bring the MWRA to Roxbury.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/11/1989
Description: B-roll of campaign staff work at the local headquarters of the Rainbow Coalition in the South End. The workers speak on the telephone, sort through papers and assemble handouts. Boyce Slayman, a political consultant, speaks to some of the workers. He shows them a newspaper headline about Jackson's top position on the Massachusetts' primary ballot. Shots of Jackson campaign pins, Jackson campaign letterhead and shots of Rainbow Coalition posters. Close up on a photo of Jackson and community activist Mel King. Exteriors of the campaign headquarters. Campaign signs for King's mayoral candidacy remain in the window of the headquarters.
1:00:01: Visual: Shot of a Rainbow Coalition campaign button reading, "Jackson in '84." Campaign workers are working in the local headquarters of the Rainbow Coalition in the South End. An African American male campaign worker rummages through cardboard boxes on the floor. He looks for something in his desk. A white female campaign worker affixes a Rainbow Coalition campaign button to her shirt. The male campaign worker answers the phone, saying "Rainbow Coalition/Mel King's Office." A white female worker sits at a desk, speaking on the telephone. The male campaign worker assembles handouts from papers at his desk. Shot of the campaign workers Rainbow Coalition campaign pin, reading "Jackson '84." Shots of the letterhead on the papers on the campaign worker's desk. The letterhead reads, "Jesse Jackson for President Committee." The male campaign worker continues to assemble handouts. A white female worker sorts through papers while on the telephone. 1:05:20: V: Shot of a black and white photo of Mel King (African American community leader and activist) and Jesse Jackson (candidate for US President). King and Jackson have raise their linked arms in the photo. The white female campaign worker continues to talk on the telephone. She is talking about the Jackson campaign. Shot of the Rainbow Coalition campaign pin worn by the worker. 1:06:31: V: Boyce Slayman (African American community leader and political consultant) stands in the headquarters of the Rainbow Coalition. He speaks to an African American female campaign worker. Shot of a small painting of a rainbow. The caption above the rainbow reads, "I believe in love." Two campaign workers converse in an office. A white female campaign worker sorts paper in the office. Slayman enters the office and picks up a newspaper. The white female campaign worker continues to sort through papers. The crew sets up a shot with the white female campaign worker and an African American female campaign worker in the office. Slayman shows them both an article from the newspaper. Shot of a newspaper article with a headline reading, "Jackson's name to top primary ballot." Shot of the white female campaign worker's campaign button which reads, "Jesse Jackson. Now is the time. 1984." The white female campaign worker and the African American female campaign worker continue to work in the office. 1:10:20: V: Slayman reads the newspaper in the outer office where the male campaign worker and a white female campaign worker sit at desks. The white female campaign worker continues to speak on the telephone. The male campaign worker continues to assemble handouts. The African American female campaign worker confers with Slayman. 1:11:47: V: Shots of the exterior of the headquarters from the street outside. Snow is falling. Campaign signs from King's mayoral campaign hang in the window. A sign for the Rainbow Coalition hangs in the window.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/13/1984
Description: Carmen Fields reports that Richard Taylor, the Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation and Construction, will preside over the Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Construction Project in Boston. Taylor is one of the few African American Republicans in Massachusetts. Interview with Taylor, who talks about his reasons for being a Republican and his career in business. Taylor talks about his commitment to affirmative action and his plans to encourage participation by women and minorities in the Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Project. Taylor says that he has always pushed for fair and equitable opportunities for minority businesses. Fields notes that Taylor says that his appointment signals a commitment to affirmative action on the part of Governor William Weld. Fields' report is accompanied by footage of Rev. Graylan Hagler and unemployed construction workers at a press conference at a construction site in Roxbury. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Alexandra Marks interviews businessmen Derek Jeter and William Singleton on the challenges faced by minority businesses in Boston
1:00:03: Visual: Footage of Richard Taylor (Secretary of Transportation and Construction) being interviewed. Taylor says that he supports limited taxes, limited regulation, more research, and development and more private sector involvement. Carmen Fields reports that Taylor is a wealthy, well educated entrepreneur; that Taylor is a Republican; that Taylor is also African American. Fields reports that Taylor is part of a small but growing band of African American Republicans. V: Shot of Taylor in his office. Footage of Taylor being interviewed. Taylor says that some have argued that all African Americans should be Republicans; that Abraham Lincoln (former US president) was a Republican. Taylor says that he believes in limited taxation and limited government involvement. Taylor says that the Republican Party encourages people to pursue economic independence; that the Republican Party discourages people from looking to the government for sustainment. Fields reports that Taylor is the State Transportation Secretary; that he presides over the Central Artery-Third Harbor Tunnel Construction Project. V: Shot of Taylor greeting an African American man and a white man as they enter his office. Footage of Taylor at a meeting with the two men and another woman. Taylor talks about the risk of delays in the project. Fields reports that Massachusetts has a high unemployment rate; that the construction project will provide jobs. Fields notes that the Republican Party is often viewed as being anti-minority, anti-women, and anti-civil rights. V: Shots of Taylor at the meeting. Footage of Taylor being interviewed by Fields. Fields asks Taylor if he is against affirmative action. Taylor says that affirmative action is necessary. Taylor says that minority businesses should participate in the project if it strengthens their skills; that minority businesses should be paid for a job well done. Taylor says that affirmative action helps minority businesses be competitive; that affirmative action is part of the remedial process. Taylor says that some affirmative action models are troublesome. Taylor says that he does not support quotas. Taylor says that some affirmative action models do not give minority businesses enough significant responsibility. Fields asks if he will be a reluctant or an enthusiastic supporter of affirmative action. Taylor says that he is inclined to have active and strong participation by women and minorities. Taylor says that he has always pushed for fair and equitable opportunities for minority businesses. Taylor talks about his career in business before entering government.Taylor says that he will do a good job in this area. Fields reports that Roxbury residents halted construction on a new Post Office facility in Dudley Square recently. Fields notes that residents wanted more jobs for community workers on the project. V: Footage of Graylan Ellis-Hagler (Church of the United Community) speaking at a press conference held at the construction site of the new Post Office in Dudley Square. A group of African American men stand behind Hagler. Hagler says that he and the men will not go away with "crumbs." Shots of the construction site. Fields notes that Taylor says that he has learned from the experience in Roxbury. V: Footage of Taylor being interviewed by Fields. Taylor says that the MBTA recently began a $9 million project to renovate Dudley Station. Taylor says that he incorporated some recent provisions from the Post Office project into the MBTA project. Turner says that it is important for the major contractor to be in agreement with the provisions of the contract. Turner says that he hopes that these provisions will be used in the Central Artery Project. Fields reports that Taylor says that his appointment signals the commitment of William Weld (governor of Massachusetts) to affirmative action. Fields notes that Turner believes that there are many opportunities for qualified people of color. V: Shots of Taylor in his office. Footage of Taylor being interviewed by Fields. Taylor talks about a recent business seminar at the Boston World Trade Center. Taylor says that the seminar focused on how minority businesses could participate in the Central Artery Project. Taylor says that he will soon meet with major contractors for the Central Artery Project. Taylor says that he hopes to link minority businesses with the major contractors in order to provide work for minorities.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/29/1991
Description: David Boeri reports that Pat Robertson, a Republican US Presidential candidate, is confident of success in the Super Tuesday primary elections. Robertson has strong support in the South. His success could threaten the campaigns of candidates in both parties, including Al Gore. Interview with Robertson, who says that he is the only conservative candidate in a position to win. Al Gore and Tipper Gore campaigning. Republican candidate Jack Kemp. Jackson campaigning in New Hampshire. Boeri reports that Jesse Jackson did well in the Iowa caucuses, and expects to do well in the New Hampshire primaries. Interview with Jackson.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Pat Robertson (Republican candidate for US President) being interviewed by David Boeri. Robertson predicts that he will place among the top three candidates in the New Hampshire Primary; that he will win every state in the Super Tuesday presidential primaries except for Missouri and Maryland. Shot of Robertson at a campaign rally. A large banner behind him reads "Americans for Robertson." The audience applauds. Footage of Robertson speaking in New Hampshire on September 25, 1987. Robertson says that a few people can change the course of the nation. Boeri reports that Robertson has always projected an air of confidence; that Robertson placed second in an upset in the Iowa caucuses. Boeri notes that Jack Kemp (Republican candidate for US President) has lost conservative votes to Robertson. V: Shots of Robertson waving to supporters; of Kemp speaking; of Robertson waving as he exits an airplane. Boeri notes that Robertson's base of support lies in the South. V: Footage of Boeri asking Robertson if he expects to be a frontrunner after the Super Tuesday primaries. Robertson says that he is the only conservative candidate who is in a position to win. Boeri reports that Robertson's success could spell trouble for Republican and Democratic candidates; that the campaign of Al Gore (Democratic candidate for US President) is centered in the South. V: Shot of Richard Gephardt (Democratic candidate for US President). Shot of Al Gore speaking to a small group of people. Tipper Gore (wife of Al Gore) sits beside him. Shots of Gore shaking hands with voters; of Al Gore and Tipper Gore exiting a building. Boeri reports that eight of fourteen Southern and border states allow crossover voting in the primary elections; that Robertson could end up with votes from conservative Democratic voters. V: Footage of Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) addressing a crowd at the Mall of New Hampshire on February 16, 1988. Jackson says that "the people can win." Shots of Jackson greeting voters. Boeri reports that Jackson did well in the Iowa caucuses. V: Footage of Jackson saying that he will beat Democratic candidates Gore, Gary Hart, and Bruce Babbit in the New Hampshire primaries; that he has not spent much time or money in "Dukakis's backyard." Shot of Jackson having his photo taken in front of the fall foliage in New Hampshire in October of 1987. Jackson turns away from the photographers and enters a building. Boeri notes that Robertson and Jackson are leaving the North to return to their bases of support in the South.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/16/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that State Rep. Byron Rushing and Republican candidate Mike Duffy are competing for the state representative seat in the ninth Suffolk District. Interviews with both Rushing and Duffy. Rushing accuses Duffy of lying about Rushing's political record. Rushing says that Duffy cannot find issues on which to challenge him. Duffy says that Rushing is arrogant and out of touch with his constituents. Duffy calls Rushing presumptuous for declaring himself "the lesbian and gay candidate." Duffy is openly gay in a district with a high percentage of gay and lesbian voters. Rushing has been endorsed by several gay and lesbian activists. He adds that lesbian and gay voters may decide the race. Jones reviews the candidates' positions on the issues. Jones notes that Rushing must prove himself to voters. He adds that there is hostility toward incumbents on the part of many voters during this election season. Jones report is accompanied by footage of both candidates campaigning and by footage of both candidates at their campaign headquarters. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Winnie Mandela speaks at the Twelfth Baptist Church
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Byron Rushing (State Representative) campaigning in the street. Rushing speaks to an African American man and an African American woman who are seated on the front steps of a building. Shot of Rushing shaking hands with an African American man and a white woman on the street. Marcus Jones reports that Democrats outnumber Republicans ten to one in Rushing's district. Jones notes that Rushing is campaigning hard against Mike Duffy (Republican candidate for state representative) in the Ninth Suffolk District. Jones notes that Duffy is a twenty-seven year old Republican. V: Shot of Duffy working at a desk. Duffy answers the telephone. Footage of Rushing being interviewed on the street. Rushing says that he is taking the campaign seriously. Rushing accuses Duffy of lying about Rushing's political record. Rushing says that Duffy is waging a "dirty campaign." Rushing says that Duffy does not deserve to get any votes. Footage of Rushing campaigning on the street. Rushing shakes hands with an African American woman on the street. A Rushing supporter stands nearby, holding a campaign sign. Rushing approaches a white woman on the street. He shakes her hand. Jones reports that the Ninth Suffolk District includes parts of the South End, the Fenway, Back Bay, and lower Roxbury. Jones reports that the race may be decided by lesbian and gay voters in the district. Jones reports that Duffy has been going door-to-door in order to introduce himself to voters. Jones notes that Duffy has never denied his homosexuality. Jones reports that Duffy believes that his homosexuality may give him an advantage. Jones adds that the district has a high concentration of gays and lesbians. Jones reports that Duffy proposes to increase the government's role in the fight against AIDS. V: Footage of Duffy knocking on the door of a housing development building. Duffy enters the building and climbs the stairs. Duffy knocks on an apartment door. Footage of Duffy being interviewed. Duffy says that the state government needs to do more to fight AIDS. Jones reports that Rushing is not conceding the lesbian and gay vote to Duffy. Jones reports that Rushing is not gay; that Rushing has been endorsed by several lesbian and gay activists. V: Shot of Rushing in his office with a campaign worker. Shots of Rushing's campaign literature; of a campaign flyer which reads, "Rushing is the lesbian and gay candidate." Footage of Rushing being interviewed on the street. Rushing says that most of his lesbian and gay constituents support him. Rushing says that he wanted his campaign literature was prepared by lesbian and gay supporters. Rushing says that he wants his campaign literature to focus on his support in the gay and lesbian community. Footage of Duffy being interviewed by Jones. Duffy says that Rushing's campaign literature is offensive; that Rushing should not call himself the "gay and lesbian candidate." Duffy says that it is unthinkable for a candidate who is not African American to run as the African American candidate. Duffy says that Rushing is presumptuous; that Rushing's campaign is offensive and demeaning. Jones reports that the two candidates differ on issues of affordable housing, crime prevention, and the budget. Jones notes that both candidates oppose the tax-rollback petition. V: Shot of Duffy and a group of campaign workers folding campaign literature. Shot of a campaign sign opposing the tax rollback; of a campaign sign for William Weld (Republican candidate for governor of Massachusetts) and Paul Cellucci (Republican candidate for lieutenant governor of Massachusetts). Jones reports that Duffy has accused Rushing of being out of touch with the people who have elected him. Jones notes that Rushing may be vulnerable to attacks on that issue. Jones adds that there seems to be hostility toward incumbents during this election season. V: Shot of Rushing waving to cars passing by on the street. Footage of Duffy being interviewed by Jones. Duffy says that voters harbor a great degree of resentment toward Rushing. Duffy says that Rushing is arrogant; that Rushing has not been there for his constituents. Footage of Rushing being interviewed. Rushing says that Duffy cannot find an issue on which to disagree with him. Rushing says that Duffy is now lying about Rushing's record. Jones stands on a street in the Ninth Suffolk District. Jones reports that the Ninth Suffolk District is evolving socially; that the district may be evolving politically. Jones notes that Rushing must prove to voters that he is still in touch with them.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/22/1990
Description: Hope Kelly reports that John Sasso, the former Chairman of Michael Dukakis' 1988 campaign, addressed members of the World Trade Club and spoke about the campaign. Sasso spoke about the Democratic Party, the role of Jesse Jackson, and the failure of the Dukakis campaign to win over voters. Sasso talks about the need for the Democratic Party to recognize Jackson's leadership. He also says that negative political advertising was not the reason for Dukakis's defeat. Kelly reviews Sasso's career and his role in the 1988 presidential campaign. She reviews Sasso's resignation from and return to the Dukakis campaign. Kelly's report includes footage of Dukakis and Jackson at the 1988 Democratic National Convention and footage of Sasso during the 1988 presidential campaign.
0:59:07: Visual: Footage of John Sasso (former chairman, 1988 Dukakis campaign) saying that he and Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) are taking the time to reflect on the successes and failures of the campaign. Hope Kelly says that Sasso has been taking stock of the 1988 Dukakis campaign. V: Footage of Sasso addressing the World Trade Club. Sasso talks about the need to identify the lessons to be learned from the 1988 campaign. Kelly reports that Sasso says that the Democratic Party needs to recognize the role of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader). V: Shots of Jackson addressing a campaign rally; of Jackson greeting supporters in the street; of Jackson hugging a supporter. Footage of Sasso speaking at the World Trade Club. Sasso says that Jackson has "an original mind;" that Jackson is a "gifted motivator." Sasso says that the Democratic Party needs to find the courage and skill to relate properly to Jackson. Sasso says that Jackson will trouble the Democratic Party until they recognize his role. Shot of Jackson, Jaqueline Jackson (wife of Jackson), Dukakis, and Kitty Dukakis (wife of Dukakis) sitting together at an event in July, 1988. Shots of Dukakis; of Jackson. Audio of Sasso saying that Democratic Party leaders need to get organized to do a better job. Footage of Sasso saying that he does not agree with those who say that negative advertising played a big role in Dukakis's defeat. Kelly reports that Sasso believes that there was a fundamental failure on the part of the Dukakis campaign. V: Shots of the audience at the World Trade Club luncheon. Sasso says that the Dukakis campaign failed to make voters realize the need for a change in leadership. Kelly reports that Sasso reflected on the state of the Democratic Party; that Sasso made no reference to the personal feelings of himself or Dukakis. V: Shot of Dukakis speaking. Sasso stands at his side. Kelly reviews Sasso's role in the Dukakis campaign, including his resignation in September of 1987. V: Footage of a CBS news report from September of 1987. Dan Rather reports that the Dukakis campaign was responsible for damaging revelations about Joseph Biden (US Senator). Dukakis speaks from a podium. Dukakis acknowledges that Sasso provided tapes about Biden to the New York Times. Sasso appears at press conference to resign. Kelly notes that Sasso had also worked on the campaign of Geraldine Ferraro (former US vice-presidential candidate). V: Footage of Ferraro at a campaign rally. Shots of Dukakis and Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) sitting in the audience. Sasso whispers in Dukakis' ear, then moves away. Kelly reports that Sasso rejoined the Dukakis campaign after an 11-month absence. V: Footage of Sasso at a gathering. A woman says "Welcome home" to Sasso. Footage of Sasso speaking to the media after his speech at the World Trade Club. Sasso says that his absence from the campaign had nothing to do with Dukakis's loss.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1989
Description: Deborah Wang reports that Saundra Graham (State Representative from Cambridge) lost the Democratic primary election to Alvin Thompson (candidate for State Representative) by a thin margin. Wang notes that Graham has a lot of support among Cambridge voters despite her loss in the primary election. Wang notes that Graham has decided to wage a sticker campaign to run against Thompson as an independent candidate in the election. Wang notes that there is no Republican challenger in the race. Wang interviews Graham about her loss in the primary election and about the sticker campaign. Wang's report includes footage of Graham going door-to-door to campaign and to explain the sticker campaign to voters. Wang interviews Thompson about the race. Thompson criticizes Graham for engaging in negative campaign tactics. Wang notes that sticker campaigns are seldom successful and that some voters seem confused about the process. Wang interviews Cambridge voters on the street about the race. Voters were not aware of Graham's sticker campaign. This tape includes additional footage of Graham campaigning in Cambridge and footage of Graham's campaign headquarters.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Saundra Graham (State Representative from Cambridge) approaching the front door of a home in a residential neighborhood. Deborah Wang reports that Graham lost the primary election to Alvin Thompson (candidate for State Representative) by a thin margin. V: Footage of Graham being interviewed by Wang. Graham says that the loss was unexpected; that she lost the election by forty-nine votes. Graham says that her supporters were complacent; that her supporters expected her to win. Wang reports that Graham blames herself for not working harder to get her supporters out to vote. Wang reports that Graham has had strong support in Cambridge; that Graham is an advocate of rent control, day care, and affordable housing. Wang reports that Graham has had personal problems in the past year; that two of her sons were arrested on drug charges; that police accuse Graham's sons of dealing drugs out of Graham's house. V: Footage of Graham saying that her personal problems gave some momentum to her opponents. Footage of Alvin Thompson greeting a white man while campaigning door-to-door. Wang reports that Thompson is a long-time Cambridge resident. V: Shot of Thompson greeting two women in the street. Footage of Thompson saying that Graham cannot serve her constituents as both City Councillor and State Representative. Thompson says that the problems facing the city are complex; that one person cannot be in two places at once. Wang reports that Thompson is now the Democratic nominee; that Thompson has no Republican challenger. V: Shots of Thompson campaign signs and stickers. Wang reports that Graham has decided to wage a sticker campaign. V: Footage of Graham approaching the front door of a residential home. A woman answers the door. Graham explains how to vote for her with a sticker in the upcoming election. Graham hands the woman her campaign literature. Graham shakes the woman's hand and leaves the premises. Wang reports that sticker campaigns are seldom successful; that some voters are confused about the process. V: Footage of a white male voter saying that he will vote for Graham because she supports gay and lesbian issues. The man says that he was not aware of Graham not being on the ballot. Footage of another white male voter saying that he did not know that Graham would not be on the ballot. Footage of Graham approaching another home. Wang reports that Graham is waging a campaign to educate voters; that Graham has repeatedly attacked Thompson on his position on rent control and his refusal to engage in a debate with her. V: Footage of Graham saying that she does not understand why Thompson will not debate her. Wang reports that Thompson has complained about Graham's negative campaign. V: Footage of Thompson saying that he will not engage in negative politics. Shots of a Graham campaign sticker; of Graham's campaign headquarters.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/02/1988
Description: Shirley Caesar is a gospel singer and pastor, also active in community and political affairs in Durham, NC. She visits Harvard to sing with a choir in Memorial Church. Fields notes that Caesar is an evangelist and a Grammy award-winning singer. Fields adds that Caesar has recently entered local politics in Durham, North Carolina. Fields interviews Caesar, who talks about her music and her outreach ministry. She also discusses her recent entry into politics. Caesar says that she sees herself as a humanitarian. Fields' report includes footage of Caesar performing with a choir in front of an audience at Memorial Church.
1:00:14: Visual: Footage of Shirley Caesar (gospel singer and evangelist) performing at Memorial Church at Harvard University on October 5, 1989. A gospel choir stands behind her. Shots of members of the audience listening to Caesar. Carmen Fields reports that Caesar has won five grammy awards; that Caesar has three gold albums. Fields reports that Caesar also runs a church and an outreach mission; that Caesar has recently been elected to the City Council of Durham, North Carolina. V: Footage of Caesar being interviewed by Fields. Caesar says that she is a "down-to-earth singer"; that she is a "concerned citizen." Caesar says that she sees herself as a humanitarian. Caesar talks about her outreach ministry. Caesar says that she puts 50% of her earnings back into the community. Footage of Caesar performing at Memorial Church; of audience members listening. Footage of Caesar saying that everyone has suffered at one time or another; that she tries to send a message of love through her music. Fields notes that Caesar offers unconditional encouragement to all through her music. V: Footage of Caesar talking about Jim Baker (evangelist). Caesar says that Baker should be forced to pay back the money he owes; that Baker should not be sent to jail. Footage of Caesar performing at Memorial Church. She speculates as to whether anyone has ever danced in the aisles of Memorial Church. The crowd applauds. Caesar says that she will "christen the aisles." Shots of audience members seated in pews and on the floor. Fields reports that Caesar will soon turn fifty years old. V: Footage of Caesar performing at Memorial Church. The audience members stand and clap their hands. Footage of Caesar being interviewed by Fields. Caesar says that she is "a traditional singer with a contemporary flavor." Caesar talks about her roots in music. Footage of Caesar saying that she would like to learn more about the workings of city government; that she may run for mayor someday. Footage of Caesar performing at Memorial Church. The audience is on its feet.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/06/1989
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Silber held a press conference on a Roxbury street today, trying to explain his comments during the previous evening's gubernatorial debate, in which he referred to the residents of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan as "a group of drug addicts." Silber apologizes for hurting anyone's feelings. A group of African American community leaders stand behind him. Vaillancourt notes that Silber blamed the media for not attending his speech on crime control on the steps of the Massachusetts State House. Vaillancourt reports that the press conference changed tone when Silber got into a hostile argument with Roxbury resident Priscilla Flint Russell. Interviews with Roxbury residents about John Silber. City Councilor Bruce Bolling, State Rep. Gloria Fox, and other Roxbury community leaders held a press conference today at which they condemned Silber for his comments. Following the edited story is additional footage of the Roxbury community leader press conference. Segments of Bruce Bolling's statement. Additional footage of John Silber's press conference. Segments for City Councilor Charles Yanceys' statement at the Roxbury community leader press conference. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on negative media coverage of the Roxbury community
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of John Silber (Democratic candidate for governor of Massachusetts) speaking at a press conference on the corner of Humboldt Avenue and Homestead Street in Roxbury. Bill Owens (State Senator) and other African American community leaders stand behind Silber. Silber says that there are upstanding, responsible citizens who fear for their lives in the Roxbury community. Silber says that he did not indict them in recent comments. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Silber held a press conference on a Roxbury street today. V: Shots of the press conference. Silber is surrounded by members of the media. A camera crew stands on top of a van to film Silber. Vaillancourt reports that Silber tried to explain his comments during a debate on the previous evening. Vaillancourt notes that a reporter at the debate asked Silber why he has not held any campaign events in the Roxbury, Dorchester, or Mattapan areas of Boston, which is also known as Area B. V: Footage from a gubernatorial campaign debate on September 11, 1990. Silber says that it is useless to give a speech about crime control to "a group of drug addicts." Silber says that it is better for him to give a speech on the steps of the Massachusetts State House. Vaillancourt reports that Silber tried to clarify his remarks today. V: Footage of Silber at the Roxbury press conference. Silber says that he regrets the confusion; that he did not mean to hurt anyone's feelings. Vaillancourt notes that Silber's comments were not all apologetic. V: Shot of a member of a TV news crew at the press conference. Footage of Silber at the Roxbury press conference. Silber tells a reporter that he was not making an apology to the community. Vaillancourt reports that Silber held his press conference in the area where Darlene Tiffany Moore (Roxbury resident and murder victim) was killed two years ago. V: Shot of a 1988 Boston Herald newspaper article featuring a photo of Moore. Vaillancourt reports that Silber chose the spot for the press conference in order to remind people of his crime control proposals. Vaillancourt notes that Silber also tried to blame the media. V: Footage of Silber at the press conference. Silber says that this is not the place for a speech about law and order. Silber says that he will make the speech at this press conference. Silber says that he recently gave a speech on crime control on the steps of the State House; that no one attended. Vaillancourt reports that there are six days left before the gubernatorial primary election. Vaillancourt notes that Silber received a lot of media attention today. V: Shots of members of the media standing on top of a van at the press conference; of reporters surrounding Silber at the press conference. Vaillancourt reports that the press conference changed its tone when a Roxbury resident told Silber that he needs to acknowledge drugs as an equal opportunity problem. V: Footage of Silber and the media at the press conference. Priscilla Flint Russell (Roxbury resident) addresses Silber. She asks him how the drugs and guns are getting into Roxbury. Russell says that Roxbury teenagers are not bringing in the drugs and guns. Silber says that the high-level drug dealers must be prosecuted by the federal courts. Russell asks who will be prosecuted. Silber tells Russell to ask Francis Bellotti (Democratic candidate for governor of Massachusetts). Russell says that she wants an answer from Silber. Silber says that he is not a prosecuting attorney. Russell stands and yells at Silber. Russell points out that Silber is the one who came to the neighborhood to talk about drugs; that she is not a drug addict. Silber turns away from the microphone, saying that he has no time for "fanaticism." Russell tells Silber to get out of the neighborhood. Vaillancourt reports that neighborhood residents talked about Silber's comments after the press conference. V: Footage of a female neighborhood resident saying that Silber showed his ignorance by speaking of her community in that way. Footage of an African American man saying that he got out of the neighborhood and went to college. The man says that he is not offended by Silber's statements. Footage of an African American woman saying that Silber's comments were taken out of context; that people are afraid to walk the streets. Vaillancourt reports that Roxbury community leaders held a press conference today; that they refused to speak Silber's name. V: Shot of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) speaking at the press conference. Footage of Gloria Fox (State Representative) speaking at the press conference. Fox says that Silber is a "wicked racist individual" who deserves no name. Fox says that Silber perpetuates the racist atmosphere which prevailed during the Carol Stuart murder case. Don Muhammad (Roxbury community leader) is among the leaders at the press conference. Vaillancourt stands on a street in Roxbury. Vaillancourt reports that Silber took a lot of heat from the Roxbury community today. Vaillancourt notes that the Roxbury community has not received much attention from Bellotti or from the Republican gubernatorial candidates. Vaillancourt reports that the Roxbury community felt snubbed by the 1988 presidential campaign of Michael Dukakis (governor of Massachusetts) because the campaign made no major stops in Roxbury. V: Footage of an African American man saying that politicians need to be more visible in Roxbury when there is no election going on. Footage of another African American man saying that he expects little from the next governor of Massachusetts; that the present governor has done little for the Roxbury community. Shot of two white police officers carefully watching an African American boy as he walks down the street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/12/1990
Description: David Boeri reports on expansion plans by the State Street Bank. The bank's activities are focused on mutual funds, pension funds, and informational services, and it has a presence on the international scene. The bank needs approval from the State Banking Commission before opening an office in Tokyo. Critics accuse the bank of abandoning its local responsibilities. State Banking Commission Hearing. State Senator Bill Owens says that the bank does not provide credit to low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. William Edgerly, Chairman of the State Street Bank and Trust says that the bank does not provide a full range of consumer services. Interview with Edgerly, who says that the bank needs to go global in order to be an industry leader. He adds that the bank is committed to the local community. Interview with Diane Strother from the Massachusetts Affordable Housing Alliance, who says that the bank does not do enough for the community. Boeri reports that affordable-housing advocates want the bank to renew its commitment to low-income neighborhoods.
1:00:13: Visual: Shots of the exterior of the State Street Bank building on Franklin Street. David Boeri reports that the State Street Bank has been in operation in Boston since 1792; that the bank has been expanding in the 1980s. V: Footage of William Edgerly (Chairman, State Street Bank and Trust) saying that the bank needs to go global in order to be a leader in the industry. Shots of the exterior of the bank; of the entrance to the bank. Boeri reports that loans are a small part of the bank's business; that the bank's focus is on mutual funds, pension funds, and informational services. V: Shots of the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on October 13, 1989; of a NYSE official banging a gavel. Footage of Edgerly saying that the bank is no longer a regional bank; that the bank is now a national and international bank. Shots of the floor of the stock exchange in Tokyo; of business workers on a busy street. Shots of Japanese workers at the Tokyo stock exchange; of a screen listing stocks at the Tokyo stock exchange. Boeri reports that State Street Bank has a presence on the international scene in London, Luxemborg, and Hong Kong; that the bank is planning an office in Tokyo. Boeri reports that advocates of affordable housing have challenged the bank's plans. V: Footage of William Owens (State Senator) at a hearing of the state banking commission. Owens says that poor urban neighborhoods remain in the "backyards" of the multinational banks. Shots of attendees and audience members at the hearing of the banking commission. Boeri reports that State Street Bank needs approval from the banking commission before it opens an office in Tokyo; that the bank remains a state bank. Boeri reports that critics say that the bank has abandoned its local responsibilities. Boeri notes that critics say that the bank has shut down branch offices in Dorchester, Roxbury, and other neighborhoods. V: Shots of audience members at the hearing. Footage of Owens addressing the banking commission. Owens says that the State Street Bank is responsible for a decrease in access to banking services in minority neighborhoods. Boeri stands in front of the State Street Bank building. Boeri reports that the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) requires banks to provide credit to their local communities. Boeri notes that a bank can have its applications denied if it does not provide credit to low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. Boeri adds that critics want the State Street Bank to take care of business in Boston before opening up a Tokyo office. V: Footage of Edgerly addressing the banking commission. Edgerly says that the State Street Bank is a wholesale bank; that the bank does not provide a full range of consumer services. Shots of audience members at the hearing. Boeri notes that State Street Bank officials say that the bank does not do home mortgages. V: Footage of Edgerly being interviewed by Boeri. Edgerly says that the State Street Bank is devoted to helping the local community become successful. Shot of Edgerly at the bank commission hearing. Boeri reports that Edgerly helped to form the Boston Housing Partnership and the Boston Compact. V: Footage of Diane Strother (Massachusetts Affordable Housing Alliance) saying that the bank does not do enough for the community. Shots of the exterior of the State Street Bank building. Boeri reports that housing advocates want the approval of the bank's Tokyo office to be linked to a renewed effort by the bank to provide banking services and loans to low-income neighborhoods.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/13/1989
Description: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) endorses Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston) at a press conference at Northeastern University. Jim King (Senior Vice President, Northeastern University) introduces Young. Young talks about King's candidacy for mayor of Boston. King says that he and Young have discussed ideas for local job creation and for trade between local businesses and third world markets. In response to audience questions, Young talks about his recommendation that King set up a trade mission to export local manufactured goods. King discusses the value of his endorsement of King and the differences among the political situations in Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia. Young says that he does not consider Boston to be a racist city. Young talks about the potential impact of the African American community on the election outcome. Young refuses to comment on the the presidential campaign of Jesse Jackson.
1:00:06: Visual: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) walks sits down at a table next to Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston). Mel King's campaign signs are visible on the walls of the room. Behind King and Young is a Northeastern University flag. A young African American woman announces that Young and "future mayor" Mel King will speak; that they will take questions after. Jim King (Senior Vice President, Northeastern University) introduces Young. He reviews Young's accomplishments. Shots of the audience. Young says that King's leadership will benefit Boston. Young talks about the importance of housing and neighborhood revitalization. Young says that King will work to reduce unemployment; that King will work with existing businesses and help to build new businesses. Young says that King is familiar with urban problems. Young commends King for his strong marriage, his family, and his values. 1:03:33: V: King calls Young "Mayor Class." King says that Young is one of the classiest politicians in the world; that Young has a world view which allows him make connections between his city and events in the greater world. King says that he and Young discussed how to create jobs in Boston; that Young has given him advice on how to unlock third world markets; that the city can help neighborhoods and businesses take advantages of these markets to create jobs. King thanks Young for coming to Boston. The audience applauds. 1:05:53: V: The audience asks questions. An audience member asks Young about his experiences as the Mayor of Atlanta. Young says that it is "fun" to solve local problems. Young says that he has recommended that King set up an export trading company to help export the city's manufactured goods. Young talks about trade missions that he has undertaken as Mayor of Atlanta. Young says that he has gone on trade missions to Trinidad and Jamaica, and is planning a trade mission to Nigeria. Young talks about how trade missions can benefit local businesses and industry. Young says that he and Henry Cisneros (Mayor of San Antonio) share the leadership of a task force for the National League of Cities; that mayors can create jobs by promoting international opportunities for local industry. Young says that Boston could export many products; that King is concerned about creating jobs through exports. Young says that he appointed a woman as Deputy Chief of Police in Atlanta; that her appointment heightened awareness of crimes against women in the city. Young says that it is important for a mayor to be responsive to problems of those who have been ignored; that King will be responsive. 1:09:59: V: An audience member asks Young about the value of his endorsement of King. Young says that Boston needs a good mayor; that he does not judge Boston to be a racist city on the basis of the actions of a few "hoodlums"; that there are voters who will elect King on the basis of his values and his positions on unemployment and crime; that skin color is not important. Young says that he is here as an urban mayor to remind people about important urban issues; that he is able to get television exposure for King. The audience applauds. An audience member asks Young about similarities in the political situations in Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia. Young says that there are few similarities; that there was a "revolution" against the mayor in Chicago; that there is more racial antagonism in Chicago than there is in Boston. Young says that Wilson Goode (candidate for Mayor of Philadelphia) will be elected because of his experience and broad support. Young says that he hopes King will emerge with broad support in Boston. Young refers to Boston's revolutionary history, saying that he hopes the city will rally around King. 1:14:11: V: An audience member points out that Boston has a small African American community with a record of low voter turnout. Young uses the example of Los Angeles as a city with a small minority population and a popularly elected African American mayor. An audience member asks Young to speculate on the chances of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) being elected to the presidency. Young says that it is too soon to speculate on anyone's campaign for the presidency. 1:16:23: V: Young answers more questions from the audience. Shots of Young from behind the audience and media; of members of the audience. Audio cuts in and out during this segment. Young talks about the need for "open and honest" government and a good relationship with the press. King answers a question about his campaign. The moderator announces an end to the press conference. 1:18:45: V: Young and King greet members of the audience and the media.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/22/1983